2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity

23. Oct 2019
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
1 von 21

Más contenido relacionado

Was ist angesagt?

Harlem renaissanceHarlem renaissance
Harlem renaissanceewaszolek
Harlem renaissanceHarlem renaissance
Harlem renaissanceTerryl Meador
Characteristics of american poetryCharacteristics of american poetry
Characteristics of american poetryBibi Halima
Mother to son (1)Mother to son (1)
Mother to son (1)josieex33
Mother to son 2Mother to son 2
Mother to son 2Aisa Ajero
The harlem renaissanceThe harlem renaissance
The harlem renaissanceaskmrlowe

Similar a 2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity

2312 Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity2312 Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity
2312 Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and ModernityDrew Burks
Why art matters   module 6Why art matters   module 6
Why art matters module 6PetrutaLipan
Modern period literature, Modernism, Modern poetry.Modern period literature, Modernism, Modern poetry.
Modern period literature, Modernism, Modern poetry.zainabnawaz15
History tech harlem masterHistory tech harlem master
History tech harlem masterDarkCubA2
American literatureAmerican literature
American literatureAndre Philip Tacderas
The Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance
The Harlem RenaissanceTreasure Shields Redmond

Más de Drew Burks

1312 19 The End of History, 1989 to the Present (revised)1312 19 The End of History, 1989 to the Present (revised)
1312 19 The End of History, 1989 to the Present (revised)Drew Burks
1312 12 WWI and the Russian Revolution1312 12 WWI and the Russian Revolution
1312 12 WWI and the Russian RevolutionDrew Burks
2312 20 Ground the 70s, 80s, and the Fall of Communism2312 20 Ground the 70s, 80s, and the Fall of Communism
2312 20 Ground the 70s, 80s, and the Fall of CommunismDrew Burks
1312 19 The End of History, 1989 to the Present1312 19 The End of History, 1989 to the Present
1312 19 The End of History, 1989 to the PresentDrew Burks
2312 19 Ground 1950s, Civil Rights2312 19 Ground 1950s, Civil Rights
2312 19 Ground 1950s, Civil RightsDrew Burks
2312 18 Ground the Cold War2312 18 Ground the Cold War
2312 18 Ground the Cold WarDrew Burks

Último

Generative AIGenerative AI
Generative AICorinne Weisgerber
ChatGPT Multi Modal.pptxChatGPT Multi Modal.pptx
ChatGPT Multi Modal.pptxScottOrtes
Primary Healing-5.pptxPrimary Healing-5.pptx
Primary Healing-5.pptxKolkata,west bengal, India
Evropski dan jezikaEvropski dan jezika
Evropski dan jezikaUgostiteljskoturisti
9.28.23 The Social Construction of Race.pptx9.28.23 The Social Construction of Race.pptx
9.28.23 The Social Construction of Race.pptxMaryPotorti1
Version Stamps in NOSQL DatabasesVersion Stamps in NOSQL Databases
Version Stamps in NOSQL DatabasesDr-Dipali Meher

2312 Online Harlem Renaissance, Major Ideas, and Modernity

Hinweis der Redaktion

  1. Born in Atlanta. Worked as a teacher and principle until 1902, then studied music (Violin) Oberlin Conservatory in Ohio. Married a prominent Republican lawyer, who was appointed to a position in Washington, DC by Pres. Taft. He did not support her writing or music, and wished her to be a homemaker (this poem is dedicated to him). After his death, she worked clerical jobs to support herself, became more famous for writing (poems and plays), and began having a weekly Salon in her house where many of the prominent figures in the Harlem Renaissance would come. These continued for 40 years. From 1926-1932 she had a weekly column that appeared in at least 20 newspapers nationwide.
  2. Born in Atlanta. Worked as a teacher and principle until 1902, then studied music (Violin) Oberlin Conservatory in Ohio. Married a prominent Republican lawyer, who was appointed to a position in Washington, DC by Pres. Taft. He did not support her writing or music, and wished her to be a homemaker (this poem is dedicated to him). After his death, she worked clerical jobs to support herself, became more famous for writing (poems and plays), and began having a weekly Salon in her house where many of the prominent figures in the Harlem Renaissance would come. These continued for 40 years. From 1926-1932 she had a weekly column that appeared in at least 20 newspapers nationwide.
  3. Born in Jamaica, came to the US in 1912 to study at the Tuskegee Institute. Disliked the intense racism in the South and the militaristic form of education at Tuskegee, so he transferred to Kansas State University. While there he was exposed to a number of prominent African-American writers, decided he did not want to study agriculture, and moved to NYC. He was a radical socialist and atheist for most of his life. He travelled extensively, including to the newly formed Soviet Union, where he spoke and wrote about life for African-Americans in the US to communist audiences. Wrote poetry, books, and served as an editor for publications during the Ren. Even published a book in the Soviet Union, in Russian which was not translated until long after his death.
  4. Born in Jamaica, came to the US in 1912 to study at the Tuskegee Institute. Disliked the intense racism in the South and the militaristic form of education at Tuskegee, so he transferred to Kansas State University. While there he was exposed to a number of prominent African-American writers, decided he did not want to study agriculture, and moved to NYC. He was a radical socialist and atheist for most of his life. He travelled extensively, including to the newly formed Soviet Union, where he spoke and wrote about life for African-Americans in the US to communist audiences. Wrote poetry, books, and served as an editor for publications during the Ren. Even published a book in the Soviet Union, in Russian which was not translated until long after his death.
  5. Born in DC, graduated from Lincoln Univ in Pennsylvania where he was a classmate of Langston Hughes. Also studied music in Boston and Rome (he sang, but never became a professional singer). Because of his love of music his poems are often characterized by a musical rhythm, and many of them have been set to music an sung – most famously by Nina Simone.
  6. Born in DC, graduated from Lincoln Univ in Pennsylvania where he was a classmate of Langston Hughes. Also studied music in Boston and Rome (he sang, but never became a professional singer). Because of his love of music his poems are often characterized by a musical rhythm, and many of them have been set to music an sung – most famously by Nina Simone.
  7. Aaron Douglas was from Topeka, KS. He later graduated from U of Nebraska and became a HS art teacher in KCMO. It was his dream to quit teaching and move to Paris (as many aspiring artists did). He stopped on his way to Paris in Harlem, and was convinced to stay. He is best known for illustrating many publications from the Harlem Ren. and for his style, which both exemplifies modernist style, and African-American themes. He has painted many murals around the country, and later became the Chair of the Art department at Fisk University in Nashville, TN. (and yes, he did achieve his dream, and in the early 30s he did live in Paris for a year)
  8. Aaron Douglas was from Topeka, KS. He later graduated from U of Nebraska and became a HS art teacher in KCMO. It was his dream to quit teaching and move to Paris (as many aspiring artists did). He stopped on his way to Paris in Harlem, and was convinced to stay. He is best known for illustrating many publications from the Harlem Ren. and for his style, which both exemplifies modernist style, and African-American themes. He has painted many murals around the country, and later became the Chair of the Art department at Fisk University in Nashville, TN. (and yes, he did achieve his dream, and in the early 30s he did live in Paris for a year)
  9. Born in Lenox, Mass. Moved to Harlem as a young man. Began taking photos as a teen, and developing them in an improvised darkroom. Later opened a portrait studio on West 125th in Harlem. His work is best known for chronicling and highlighting African-American life in NY (and later the US) in the 1920s and 1930s. He was important enough at the time that he was commissioned to document the UNIA by Marcus Garvey. His prominence was largely forgotten until the late 1960s, when his work was “rediscovered” by another photographer creating an art exhibit on Harlem in this period. The photographer had walked into his studio and asked if he still had any pictures from then, only to be shocked when he produced boxes and boxes of negatives. He was then made the centerpiece of the show. He continued to work as a photographer until his death in 1983.