Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
 
 
 
 
1/8/2016 
 
   
Development of a conceptual framework on 
rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an 
incentiv...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
i 
 
 
Title sheet  
Faculty:  
Aalborg University 
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing  
Engineering 
 
Fibige...
 
 
ii 
 
 
 
   
 
 
iii 
 
Summary
This research was conducted as a Master of Science final Thesis in Management in the Building 
Industry...
 
 
iv 
 
Dansk Resume
Denne  undersøgelse  var  udført  som  kandidatspeciale  i  Byggeledelse  (cand.scient.tech)  ved 
...
 
 
v 
 
LIST OF ACRONYMS
EDI – Employee‐Driven Innovation 
R&D – Research and Development 
OECD – Organisation for Econom...
 
 
vi 
 
Acknowledgments
This  thesis  was  conducted  in  collaboration  with  the  Construction  Management  group  at ...
 
 
vii 
 
Table of Contents 
Title sheet ...................................................................................
 
 
viii 
 
3.2.5  TESTING EMPLOYEE‐DRIVEN INNOVATION FOR A POTENTIAL FOSTERING 
ENVIRONMENT ................................
 
 
ix 
 
   
 
 
x 
 
   
 
 
1 
 
CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
 
In this chapter, the background for the report, motivation and clarifications will be p...
 
 
2 
 
Drawing a simple perspective on this, it is imperative to look into a source which is widely used 
and commonly a...
 
 
3 
 
interesting to mention that customers were the second choice in Sweden as a driving force for 
innovation, while ...
 
 
4 
 
 
Figure 1.3 – EDI in an organizational context [Høyrup, 2012] 
Innovation can be derived from the way employees ...
 
 
5 
 
 More than half of respondents of surveys conducted within the construction industry 
in Northern Denmark, Swede...
 
 
6 
 
 
1.3 DEFINITIONS, DELIMITATIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS 
 
This section contains essential definitions and clarificat...
 
 
7 
 
 
1.4 THESIS STRUCTURE 
 
This thesis is based upon a collection of papers, where the important elements of the r...
 
 
8 
 
CHAPTER 2. RESEARCH DESIGN
 
The conducted research is based on philosophical assumptions, which shape how the re...
 
 
9 
 
However, there is no clear definition of these “paradigms”. The inquiry paradigms of Guba and 
Lincoln could be a...
 
 
10 
 
Going back to [Guba & Lincoln, 2000] the Inquiry paradigms3
 need to be presented before the 
choice of philosop...
 
 
11 
 
“Geertz’s (1988, 1993) prophecy about the “blurring of genres” is rapidly being fulfilled. Inquiry 
methodology ...
 
 
12 
 
Researchers, who engage in this form of inquiry, support an inductive style, a focus on individual 
meaning and ...
 
 
13 
 
Scientific Paradigm, 
Methodology and Research 
Design 
 
The second step contained 
defining the philosophical ...
 
 
14 
 
A perspective that has not been tackled yet is the reasoning in this research. Essentially there are 
two basic ...
 
 
15 
 
and fourth, a synthesis was done to develop the theoretical base of knowledge. The output was 
Appendix B, and a...
 
 
16 
 
2.6 ASSESMENT OF THE RESEARCH DESIGN 
 
Validity and trustworthiness is an important part of any research. The c...
 
 
17 
 
CHAPTER 3. DEVELOPMENT OF A THEORETICAL BASE OF
KNOWLEDGE
In  this  chapter,  all  of  the  main  research  carr...
 
 
18 
 
collection of important articles by following [Levy & Ellis, 2006] steps, and content analysis. The 
exact proce...
 
 
19 
 
taking a calculated risk should, in the event of failure not be punished but, rather encouraged to 
further take...
 
 
20 
 
literature and case study presented before, so it was considered to be even more relevant to the 
thesis purpose...
 
 
21 
 
mechanisms for how an incentive system such as “rewarding failure within innovation attempts” 
could be develope...
 
 
22 
 
3.2 THE POSSIBILITIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OF LEARNING BY 
EXAMPLE 
 
This part of the thesis, covers th...
 
 
23 
 
the amount of articles. 45 relevant articles were then analyzed by an abstract review, and the list 
was shorten...
 
 
24 
 
within  the  Construction  industry.  The  significance  of  the  theoretical  landscape  and  the 
mechanisms a...
 
 
25 
 
 Action learning in the form of regular meetings – “problem solving method” [Hirota et. al, 
1999] 
 
One inter...
 
 
26 
 
 
 
Figure 3.3 – Ideal type organizational structure of conducting EDI [Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010] 
Drawing some per...
 
 
27 
 
of view and in a shorter version of Figure 3.4 [Aasen et.al, 2012] present results concluded from 
an analysis i...
 
 
28 
 
are motivated by incentives, but that some employees could be satisfied with the current 
situation. This seems ...
 
 
29 
 
the history of radical innovations in the construction industry, or “paradigm shifts”, potential 
systems which ...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outse...
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outsets in the Construction Industry

423 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

  • Do This Simple 2-Minute Ritual To Loss 1 Pound Of Belly Fat Every 72 Hours ★★★ http://ishbv.com/bkfitness3/pdf
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Doctor's 2-Minute Ritual For Shocking Daily Belly Fat Loss! Watch This Video ■■■ http://ishbv.com/bkfitness3/pdf
       Antworten 
    Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie …  Ja  Nein
    Ihre Nachricht erscheint hier
  • Gehören Sie zu den Ersten, denen das gefällt!

Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outsets in the Construction Industry

  1. 1.         1/8/2016        Development of a conceptual framework on  rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an  incentive for employees with outsets in the  Construction Industry  Innovation Management  Dragos Bogdan Todoran    Master Thesis, Aalborg University 
  2. 2.            
  3. 3.     i      Title sheet   Faculty:   Aalborg University  Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing   Engineering    Fibigerstræde 16, 9220 Aalborg Øst, Denmark  Education:  Management in the Building Industry  Cand.Tech.Byggeledelse  Title:   Development of a Conceptual Framework on  rewarding failure in innovation attempts as an  incentive for employees with outsets in the   construction Industry  Topic:  Innovation Management  Project period:  1 September 2015 – 08 January 2016  Author  Dragos Bogdan Todoran  dtodor14@student.aau.dk   Main supervisor:  Henrik Sørensen, M.Sc. Eng, PhD  hensor@mil.dk   Main report content: 34 pages  Appendix content: 37 pages  Delivery date:  08/01/2016  Dragos Bogdan Todoran      ___________________________________________________  Synopsis  This short Master Thesis covers the  dilemma, of whether employees should be  rewarded for failed innovation attempts.  The dilemma is handled as an incentive  system with outsets in the Construction  Industry, and developing a conceptual  framework for doing so. The research is  conducted through a case study with  multiple case units and a comparative  analysis between them. The results show  that rewarding failure in innovation  attempts is an incentive mechanism for  employees but it has been applied scarcely  so far in real life applications. The  relevance of this research is that so far,  innovation management in this aspect has  been scarcely covered.   The second part of the thesis is to  investigate how the construction industry  learns from other industries. The  investigation has been carried out with the  purpose of reaching common key  mechanisms, between the historical  adoption of Lean construction,  applicability of EDI, and “rewarding  failure” so that a conceptual framework  for conducting an incentive program was  developed.   
  4. 4.     ii           
  5. 5.     iii    Summary This research was conducted as a Master of Science final Thesis in Management in the Building  Industry Programme (MSc) at Aalborg University, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing  Engineering, Aalborg, Denmark. This thesis was conducted as a paper based version, based on  three papers, cf. Appendix, and annexes which describe the data collection and analysis process  in a full perspective.  The  construction  industry  has  long  been  known  as  a  main  driver  for  the  economy  in  many  countries, and an important part of today’s job sector. However, the construction industry is also  well  known  for  its  resistance  to  change,  and  considered  slow  adapting  when  it  comes  to  innovation. Instead of being focused on long term planning, development and innovation; it  focuses on short‐term gains or “low hanging fruit”. Regardless of these aspects, the construction  industry  has  a  large  potential  for  fostering  innovation  processes  through  its  complex  organizations and intertwined environment. In many industries, the employees are considered  an important and effective source of innovation and creativity potential. Incentive programs,  either financial or psychological have been used along time to reward productivity or successful  application  of  different  innovation  processes,  whereas  failure  has  been  always  rejected  and  dismissed bluntly in most cases, by thus having a negative impact on employees’ motivation.   The main topic of this research was the development of a conceptual framework in which an  incentive  program  that  rewards  failure  in  innovation  attempts  can  find  its  place  within  the  construction industry. The key areas of interest were: firstly, innovation management in different  industrial sectors, and their application of incentive systems which rewards failure in innovation  attempts. And second to find a place for the applicability of such an incentive system in the  construction industry.   The findings were based on an exploratory case study with multiple case units; a comparative  analysis between them and another case study from previous research made in this topic. The  originality was based upon the fact that this topic has been researched scarcely so far.   The research was initiated by literature review, where answers to such an incentive system could  be  found,  and  once  contact  with  a  corporation  has  been  established  which  fosters  such  an  incentive program, a case study was developed based on two units within the main corporation.  In order to ensure credibility of the data, a comparative analysis has been made between the two  case  units  and  a  previously  researched  case  study,  to  identify  recurring  patterns  and  key  mechanisms for adopting such a system. The research was then directed, towards the learning  capabilities  of  the  construction  industry  from  other  industries.  Through  the  research,  the  adoption of Lean practices was undertaken and also Employee‐driven innovation, in order to  identify similar key mechanisms as to where an incentive system such as rewarding failure could  be fostered within the Construction Industry.  
  6. 6.     iv    Dansk Resume Denne  undersøgelse  var  udført  som  kandidatspeciale  i  Byggeledelse  (cand.scient.tech)  ved  Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Mekanik og Produktion. Denne afhandling blev udført som en  papirbaseret udgave, hvor den er baseret ud fra tre bilag.   Byggebranchen har længe været kendt som den vigtigste drivkraft for økonomien i mange land  og er derfor en vigtig del af jobsektoren i dag. Byggebranchen er også kendt for sin modstand  mod forandring, og anses for langsom tilpasning, når det gælder innovation. I stedet for at være  fokuseret  på  langsigtet  planlægning,  udvikling  og  innovation,  fokuserer  den  på  kortsigtede  gevinster eller kortsigtet profit. Uanset disse aspekter har byggeriet et stort potentiale for at  fremme innovationsprocesser gennem sine komplekse organisationer og sammenflettede miljø.   I mange brancher betragtes de ansatte som en vigtig og effektiv kilde til innovation og kreativ  tankegang.  Programmer for medarbejdere har længe eksisteret for at belønne medarbejdere  økonomisk.  Enten  ved  at  øge  produktiviteten,  eller  implementere  innovative  processer,  hvorimod  fiasko  altid  bliver  afvist,  og  dermed  har  det  en  negativ  effekt  i    forhold  til  medarbejdernes  motivation.  Det  vigtigste  emne  i  denne  forskning  var  udviklingen  af  en  begrebsramme, hvor et incitamentsprogram, der belønner svigt i innovationsforsøg kan finde sin  plads  i  byggebranchen.  De  mest  interessante  hovedområder  var  først  og  fremmest  innovationsledelse  i  forskellige  industrielle  sektorer  og  deres  implementering  af  incitamentsordninger, som belønner på trods af fejl i innovationsforsøg, og for det andet at finde  anvendeligheden af et sådant incitament system i byggebranchen.   Resultaterne var baseret på forskningsmæssige sager med flere sags enheder, og en komparativ  analyse mellem dem og sager fra tidligere forskning foretaget i dette emne. Originaliteten var  baseret på det faktum, at dette emne er blevet forsket minimalt.   Forskningen blev indledt af en litteraturgennemgang, hvor svar på et sådant incitament system  kunne  findes,  og  når  der  er  etableret  kontakt  til  en  virksomhed,  der  fremmer  et  sådan  incitamentsprogram,  blev  en  sag  udviklet  på  baggrund  af  to  enheder  inden  for  det  centrale  selskab. For at sikre troværdigheden af de oplysninger er der blevet lavet en komparativ analyse  mellem de to sags enheder, hvor tidligere forskning af disse studier har identificerede de vigtigste  mekanismer til at vedtage et sådant system.   Forskningen blev derefter rettet mod læringskapaciteter af byggebranchen fra andre industrier.  Gennem forskning har implementeringen vist hvordan besparelser skal gennemføres og også  medarbejder drevet innovation med henblik på at identificere lignende vigtige mekanismer til,  hvordan et incitament system som belønner medarbejdere, som tør tænke  og arbejde innovativt  selvom  der  er  risiko  for  fiasko,  hvor  incitament  systemet  kunne  fremme  dette  inden  for  byggebranchen.   
  7. 7.     v    LIST OF ACRONYMS EDI – Employee‐Driven Innovation  R&D – Research and Development  OECD – Organisation for Economic Co‐operation and Development  OSLO Manual – Guidelines for collecting and interpreting innovation data  RQ – Research Question 
  8. 8.     vi    Acknowledgments This  thesis  was  conducted  in  collaboration  with  the  Construction  Management  group  at  the  Department  of  Mechanical  &  Manufacturing  Engineering  at  Aalborg  University.  There  are  a  number of people who have been involved in making this Master Thesis possible and guiding me  through my studies. Therefore I owe a special thanks to:   First and foremost, I am gladly in debt to my supervisor, Henrik Sørensen for his continuous  support, good feedback and willingness to encourage and keep me on track with my research. In  understanding my ambitions for the future in hoping to take a Ph.D. degree and guiding me  through the process as best as possible, you have become a model and an inspiration for me as  a researcher and a professional in the field.  Second of all I am grateful for all the good input and the occasional good talks with my professor  Jesper Kranker Larsen, especially on research paradigms and his more detailed explanation on  some information I used in this thesis. A special thanks I owe to Prof. Lene Faber Ussing, our class  coordinator for listening to me when I was in need and guiding me through various problems.  I wish to also express my gratitude towards all my teachers from Aalborg University. Without  their guidance, I would not have reached in finishing a Master Thesis.   A special thank you I owe to Mr. Ranjeet Joshipura, from TATA Group for helping me out get in  touch with several departments of TATA Group in pursuing this research. I also am grateful and  wish to thank for their good input to Mr. Sujit Guha from TATA Consultancy Services and to Peter  Brown from Jaguar Land Rover Ltd. for his input and data provided for my thesis. Without their  help, I would not have had the data I needed.   I also owe a special thanks to my girlfriend, Tiffany who has been most patient with me especially  in the last few weeks of this Thesis, when the work was at its hardest peak and for her continuous  support. I also wish to say I special thank you to my best friend Olimpiu, for all the talks we had  on my thesis and his support always when I needed. A thank you should also go to Asbjørn for  his willingness to jump in and help when my Danish skills were out of control or simply not  enough.  Last but not least, I wish to dedicate this Thesis to my family. It is a challenge and a hard one to  raise a child and guide him through life giving him the best you can, so he can grow and develop  as a human being. So far, this thesis encompasses all the years of hard work and sacrifices, and it  is for now the peak of my professional development. Especially to my little brother Tudor; one  day when you grow up, I hope you get even further than I ever did and make me proud even  more for being your humble, older brother.   Aalborg, January 2016  Dragos Bogdan Todoran 
  9. 9.     vii    Table of Contents  Title sheet ...................................................................................................................................................... i  Summary ...................................................................................................................................................... iii  Dansk Resume .............................................................................................................................................. iv  Acknowledgments ........................................................................................................................................ vi  CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 1  1.1  BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION ............................................................................................... 1  1.2  RESEARCH PROBLEM .................................................................................................................... 4  1.3  DEFINITIONS, DELIMITATIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS ................................................................ 6  1.4  THESIS STRUCTURE ....................................................................................................................... 7  CHAPTER 2. RESEARCH DESIGN .................................................................................................................... 8  2.1  SCIENTIFIC PARADIGM ................................................................................................................. 8  2.2  ONTOLOGY.................................................................................................................................. 10  2.3  EPISTEMOLOGY .......................................................................................................................... 11  2.4  METHODOLOGY .......................................................................................................................... 11  2.5  RESEARCH DESIGN ...................................................................................................................... 12  2.6  ASSESMENT OF THE RESEARCH DESIGN .................................................................................... 16  CHAPTER 3. DEVELOPMENT OF A THEORETICAL BASE OF KNOWLEDGE ................................................... 17  3.1  REWARDING FAILURE IN INNOVATION ATTEMPTS AS AN INCENTIVE SYSTEM ...................... 17  3.1.1  TESTING THE THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL LANDSCAPE OF THE TOPIC “REWARDING  FAILURE IN INNOVATION” ................................................................................................................. 17  3.1.2  THE THEORETICAL LANDSCAPE OF THE TOPIC “REWARDING FAILURE IN INNOVATION”   18  3.1.3  PARTIAL CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................ 19  3.1.4  TESTING THE PRACTICAL LANDSCAPE OF THE TOPIC “REWARDING FAILURE IN  INNOVATION” – CASE STUDY AT TATA GROUP ................................................................................ 19  3.1.5  CASE STUDY RESULTS – THE PRACTICAL LANDSCAPE ....................................................... 20  3.1.6  PARTIAL CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................ 21  3.2  THE POSSIBILITIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OF LEARNING BY EXAMPLE ............... 22  3.2.1  LITERATURE STUDY ............................................................................................................ 22  3.2.2  ADOPTION OF LEAN CONSTRUCTION FROM THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY ............ 23  3.2.3  THE THEORETICAL LANDSCAPE OF LEAN CONSTRUCTION ADOPTION............................. 23  3.2.4  PARTIAL CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................ 24 
  10. 10.     viii    3.2.5  TESTING EMPLOYEE‐DRIVEN INNOVATION FOR A POTENTIAL FOSTERING  ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................................................................... 25  3.2.6  PARTIAL CONCLUSION ........................................................................................................ 27  CHAPTER 4. DEVELOPMENT OF CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF AN  INCENTIVE PROGRAM WITHIN AN ORGANIZATION ................................................................................... 29  4.1  A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM SUCH AS REWARDING  FAILURE IN INNOVATION ATTEMPTS ................................................................................................ 30  4.2  CONCLUSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES ........................................................................................ 32  References ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….34  Appendix A ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  Appendix B ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  Appendix C ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..     
  11. 11.     ix       
  12. 12.     x       
  13. 13.     1    CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION   In this chapter, the background for the report, motivation and clarifications will be presented.  Moreover, the research questions are outlined, together with the thesis structure, including the  separation between the main thesis and appendixes. The specific methods for obtaining the  necessary  data  are  presented  in  Appendix  A  –  Methodology  for  Introduction  and  Problem  formulation [Working paper].  1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION  One of the perspectives that has not really been resolved, is the dilemma whether failure in  innovation  attempts  should  be  rewarded,  while  keeping  in  mind  that  employees  should  be  rewarded for their effort, and motivated to contribute more to innovation attempts. [Sørensen,  2015]. This thesis looks into this specific gap in research. Also, what needs to be considered is  that there is a common agreement between most actors involved in one way or another in the  construction  industry  that  it  is  conservative  and  slow  paced  when  it  comes  to  innovation  compared  to  other  industries.  [Tatum,  1987;  Winch  2003;  Bygballe  &  Ingemansson,  2014].  [Bougrain et.al. 2010] give this conservatism of the industry the term laggard.   However slow paced and conservative the construction industry is, [Winch, 2003] draws the  conclusion at the end of his research that the construction industry is not that idiosyncratic to  not be able to learn from other manufacturing industries. The construction industry innovation  process is very different compared to the manufacturing process but provides excellent potential  for fostering innovation through its existing project models and network capability [Anderson &  Schaan, 2001; Johnston & Lawrence, 1988; Seaden & Manseau 2001]. And what is also important  is that this goes the other way around. [Winch, 2003] argues that the manufacturing industry can  also learn from the construction industry.    [Bygballe & Ingemansson, 2014; Slaughter, 1993] found out that employees are the main driver  for innovation in construction companies, and most importantly that [Arditi & Tangkar, 2000;  Sørensen, 2015] seem to agree that R&D departments are not solely responsible for innovation  anymore, but that employees strive and drive the innovation processes forward; [Kesting & Ulhøi,  2010] support this.  In order to assess properly the innovation process within the construction industry, it has to be  considered  that  innovation  in  this  industry  is  rather  challenging  with  a  very  complex  arena  [Seaden & Manseau, 2001]. However, it is important to look upon how innovation is defined in a  broader  aspect.  The  problem  is  that  the  variations  of  the  term  innovation  are  quite  large.  Innovation can be described as “a change in routine” [Nelson & Winter, 1982]. Others, describe  it in this context as a first use of a new technology in a construction firm [Tatum, 1987]. Or, as  [Higgins, 1994] goes, he resolves this into an equation giving 4 dimensions to innovation; Product,  Process, Marketing and Management.   
  14. 14.     2    Drawing a simple perspective on this, it is imperative to look into a source which is widely used  and commonly agreed upon in the OECD countries where the following explanation is given:  “A technological product innovation is the implementation/commercialization of a product with  improved performance characteristics such as to deliver objectively new or improved services to  the  consumer.  A  technological  process  innovation  is  the  implementation/adoption  of  new  or  significantly  improved  production  or  delivery  methods.  It  may  involve  changes  in  equipment,  human resources, working methods or a combination of these.” [OECD, 1997 sect. 24]  As seen in the Oslo Manual in its second edition, it focuses only on two dimensions, which Higgins  came up with through the Innovation equation. However, in its third edition the Oslo Manual  [OECD & Eurostat, 2005] adds Marketing and Organizational innovation into account, by thus  aligning itself to Higgins’s equation1 . Considering this, the need to look into specific explanations  for marketing and management innovation is required.  [Higgins,  1994]  defined  Marketing  innovation  as  being  product  functions  separate  from  the  product  development  itself  therefore  according  to  [Pearce,  1992]  attributed  all  this  to  a  management process responsible for planning action to satisfy and identify customer needs.     On the other hand, Management innovation, can be found for example in reengineering which  he  calls  an  innovation  but  the  basis  of  the  dimension  would  be  improving  the  way  the  organization is managed. [Higgins 1994].    Figure 1.1 – The innovation equation [Higgins 1994]  In regards to innovation in Scandinavia, [Bygballe’s & Ingemansson, 2014] present findings from  two studies of innovation in the Norwegian and Swedish market. As they mention the similarities  between the two markets, it is quite sensitive to assume that any similar study conducted on the  Danish market would give similar results. The similarity between Denmark, Sweden and Norway  can be sustained by [Hansen, 2011].   Briefly illustrating, in their study, [Bygballe’s & Ingemansson, 2014] present the findings in their  joint study that in Sweden, 78% of the respondents were defining co‐workers as the main driving  force of innovation while in Norway around 53% were following the same pattern. Also it is                                                               1  It is the authors’ belief that the explanation provided in the OSLO Manual, third edition on organizational  innovation is almost similar to the management innovation definition provided by Higgins, therefore the two  differences in terms are considered to be irrelevant being one and the same principle. 
  15. 15.     3    interesting to mention that customers were the second choice in Sweden as a driving force for  innovation, while in Norway the customers where the first option.  The study conducted also showed that it is processes and managing projects that are innovated  mostly  whereas  technical  developments  and  materials  are  less  centralized  [Bygballe  &  Ingemansson,  2014].  The  research  also  reinforced  previous  research  that  innovation  in  the  construction  industry  is  highly  different  compared  to  manufacturing  industries  due  to  the  relations between construction parties, by thus the “complex arena” being confirmed [Seaden &  Manseau 2001].  In  regards  to  the  Danish  construction  sector,  a  Master  thesis  report  conducted  at  Aalborg  University showed that innovation in Northern Denmark at least is mostly present within middle  sized and larger companies [Bohnstedt & Larsen, 2012]. But the most interesting aspect to be  considered as a starting point and seeing the similarity with the Swedish and Norwegian industry  is that the half of the companies that are seeking improvements and potential breakthroughs by  using innovation not only are involving employees but they are also rewarding successes.   In Figure 1.2 research conducted by the Danish Statistics show again similarities with the previous  study  in  Sweden  and  Norway.  The  similarities  conclude  the  fact  that  it  is  process  and  organizational innovation that are predominant throughout the industry, therefore reinforcing  the findings in the other two Scandinavian countries.    Figure 1.2 – Innovative companies according to branch and innovation type [Danmark statistik,  2015a]  If until now, the data presents that larger companies adopt and foster systems that can have  improved potential for advanced innovation processes, the next part looks into one structure or  methodology which essentially deals with the involvement of employees into the innovation  process – Employee‐driven innovation. To further detail on the topic and find which potential  solutions can be adopted, Employee Driven Innovation is chosen as a reference point into what  type of processes can foster and have potential answers.   For  a  better  understanding,  the  following  figure  shows  the  core  elements  of  EDI  at  an  organizational  level.  The  figure  presents  three  main  viewpoints  and  interaction  into  EDI:  Organizational culture/Organization of work, Learning processes and Innovation processes.    
  16. 16.     4      Figure 1.3 – EDI in an organizational context [Høyrup, 2012]  Innovation can be derived from the way employees perform their jobs, taking into account the  organization as well as personal interests [Price et. al, 2012] Whereas the authors acknowledge  the  appearance  of  innovation  from  different  practices,  they  also  take  into  account  the  aforementioned characteristics of the organization; but the main aspect being that while day to  day processes keep going on, and teams tend to disband and re‐form according to the different  tasks assigned, the learning process keeps continuing. Taking into account the complexity of  construction companies organizations, this topic becomes much more interesting to follow.   The  motivation  for  pursuing  the  topic  of  “rewarding  failure”  lies  in  the  willingness  to  find  examples  of  how  “rewarding  failure”  can  be  done.  The  significance  of  this  thesis  is  that  it  combines  elements  from  different  industries  and  tries  to  organize  them  into  a  conceptual  framework of how innovation failures can be a positive process and should be rewarded in some  situations – with the end scope of attributing these elements to the construction industry.   1.2 RESEARCH PROBLEM    Drawing conclusions from the previous subchapter, it can be clearly underlined that:   The construction industry is having an intertwined complex system – “arena” [Seaden  & Manseau 2001].   The  construction  industry  it  is  conservative  and  slow  paced  when  it  comes  to  innovation  compared  to  other  industries.  [Tatum,  1987;  Winch  2003;  Bygballe  &  Ingemansson, 2014] – laggard [Bougrain et.al. 2010]   However,  the  construction  industry  provides  excellent  potential  for  fostering  innovation through its existing project models and network capability. [Anderson &  Schaan, 2001; Johnston & Lawrence, 1988; Seaden & Manseau 2001] et.al.   The  task  of  innovation  does  not  rely  only  on  the  shoulders  of  R&D  Departments  anymore, employees being an important part of it. [Bygballe & Ingemansson, 2014;  Slaughter, 1993; Sørensen, 2015; Tangkar & Arditi, 2000; Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010]   Creativity  +  Organizational  culture  usually  results  in  proper  innovation  products   [Higgins 1994] 
  17. 17.     5     More than half of respondents of surveys conducted within the construction industry  in Northern Denmark, Sweden and Norway have answered that employees are an  important part of the innovation process. [Bygballe’s & Ingemansson, 2014, Danmark  statistik, 2015]. A further note on this is that according to [Bohnstedt & Larsen, 2012]  it is large companies that drag the industry forward when it comes to innovation  processes (over 50 employees)   The involvement of employees into innovation attempts and the process related to it  can be traced to a framework such as Employee‐Driven innovation, where there exists  a connection between the work‐organization to learning and innovation. Therefore  the  innovation  processes  is  strictly  related  to  a  learning  process  within  an  organizational culture that embraces innovation [Høyrup, 2012]. [Price et. al, 2012]  concludes  that  the  learning  process  within  an  organization  and  keeps  continuing  regardless of the disbanding of teams within an organization.   Therefore the main topic and objective for this research is the following:  Development of a conceptual framework on rewarding failure in  innovation attempts as an incentive for employees with outsets  in the construction industry  Due to the fact that the topic is extremely ambiguous and extending over various disciplines, the  following research questions [RQ] were answered in order to comprehend a large theoretical  base of knowledge combined with real‐life examples:    RQ1)  Is rewarding failure done in other industries and if so, how is it done?    RQ2)  How can the construction industry learn from other industries by taking example?  By answering these research questions, the thesis investigates across various disciplines, by  using different research methods. In order to ensure research objectiveness, trustworthiness  and the reasoning, scientific approach and methodology will be explained in the next chapter.  The overall scope in answering these research questions is to comprehend a large database  of knowledge, so that the concepts and the theories presented can develop further into a  framework. This is also sustained by [Silvermann, 2006].     
  18. 18.     6      1.3 DEFINITIONS, DELIMITATIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS    This section contains essential definitions and clarifications of various key terms which are used  across this thesis. As they are used in a general context, but with a specific scope, their definitions  and clarifications are important to ensure the reader understands the perspectives in which they  are used.  “Innovation  is  the  process  of  making  changes,  large  and  small,  radical  and  incremental,  to  products,  processes,  and  services  that  results  in  the  introduction  of  something  new  for  the  organization  that  adds  value  to  customers  and  contribute  to  the  knowledge  store  of  the  organizations.” [O'Sullivan & Dooley, 2009, p. 5]  By using this, the research is widened and various types of innovation can be discussed, but the  research  cannot  go  out  of  topic  by  addressing  clarifications  or  add  debate  on  whether  one  process or another can be considered as innovation. Any small value adding change added to a  company or any attempt to do so can go under the term innovation. To reinforce this, the main  starting point in defining innovation is called upon: “innovation is novelty that creates economical  value” [Schumpeter, 1934].  “The  term  "incentive"  implies  a  diverse  set  of  meanings.  The  literal  definition  states  that  an  incentive is something that inspires action. In terms of the construction industry this definition is  translated  into  attempts  to  increase  production  or  performance  in  return  for  increased  psychological or material rewards.” [Liska & Snell, 1992]   Motivational factors, sources of motivation and incentives were considered congruent terms in  this  research.  As  explained  by  [Liska  &  Snell,  1992]  incentives  are  attempts  of  increasing  production or performance in return for psychological or material rewards. Therefore they have  the same underlying meaning as motivational factor and source of motivation  In this Thesis, the term “phenomenon” has two implications. When sources were referenced, it  related to the theory. Then it was used outside that context, it implied the phenomenon of  “rewarding failure”  The main delimitation of this thesis can be considered the scarce data received from the units  within the case study. Steps were undertaken to ensure that the methodology is to be followed  through, however the method had to be shifted ultimately.   The second delimitation of this thesis was the time‐frame and limited resources in conducting  this research. The limitations were out of the researchers’ possibility of altering.    
  19. 19.     7      1.4 THESIS STRUCTURE    This thesis is based upon a collection of papers, where the important elements of the research  are based on the papers2  and annexes that contribute each to the development of the chapters.  The structure of the thesis is based on a main report and three appendixes plus annexes. The  main  report  summarizes  the  research  in  terms  of  introduction,  research  questions,  research  design and the research conclusions. The appendixes comprise the full descriptive papers with  the data and the methods for collecting, conducting and analyzing it. The annexes comprise the  step by step process of what has been done in regards to the development of the papers and the  Main Report.  The structure of the thesis is divided in the following chapters:   CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION  The introduction chapter presents the background and motivation for the thesis, the research  background,  the  proposal  for  the  final  topic,  research  questions  and  the  definitions  and  clarifications of some important terms. The chapter is based on the steps detailed in Appendix A.   CHAPTER 2 – RESEARCH DESIGN  This chapter presents the overall research design consideration, the philosophical considerations,  and the final research design with a step by step description of the Master Thesis project.   CHAPTER 3 – DEVELOPMENT OF A BASE OF KNOWLEDGE  This chapter contains the main research conducted in this thesis. Each sub‐chapter deals with the  main objectives of the thesis, presents the findings, and draws partial conclusions related to the  research questions. The papers on which this chapter is based are Appendix B and Appendix C.  CHAPTER 4 – PROPOSAL OF A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK   This chapter contains the overall proposal of a conceptual framework, derived from the findings  and partial conclusions drawn from chapter 3 cf. also Appendix B and Appendix C.   CHAPTER 5 – CONCLUSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES  Finally, the conclusion chapter’s purpose is to conclude the overall findings of the research. The  chapter gives at the end some overall perspective on the research and where further research is  needed.                                                                2  In this thesis structure, papers refer to the working papers, cf. Appendixes A to C, related to the paper‐based  thesis. Appendix A is a working paper and does not contain the specific elements of an IMRaD structure. Articles  refer to literature published by other authors and used in this research. 
  20. 20.     8    CHAPTER 2. RESEARCH DESIGN   The conducted research is based on philosophical assumptions, which shape how the research is  performed. The philosophical approach affects the choice of how the research design is made,  based on what considerations. In this chapter the scientific paradigm, key concepts of ontology,  epistemology  and  methodology  are  presented  which  have  served  as  a  groundwork  for  the  research  design  as  an  overall.  Together  with  the  research  design,  the  applied  methods  for  collecting and analyzing data are presented, and the steps taken to ensure the credibility and  trustworthiness of the data.   2.1 SCIENTIFIC PARADIGM    In  any  research,  the  scientific  paradigm  occupies  an  important  role  in  how  the  research  is  performed. According to Kuhn [1977], "A paradigm is what members of a scientific community,  and they alone, share". However, the original explanation of Kuhn has shifted in recent times.  The scientific paradigm applied to any paper is considered to be the researcher’s basic beliefs –  how he perceives the world [Guba and Lincoln 1994]. Given that, Heron and Reason [1997]  essentially added one more paradigm based on arguing that the “constructivist position fails to  account for experimental knowing”. The initial basic beliefs of Alternative Inquiry Paradigms by  Guba and Lincoln [1994] are positivism, postpositivism, critical theory et al., constructivism and  participatory being the contribution of Heron and Reason [1997].  Guba and Lincoln [1994] argued that the inquiry paradigms are highlighted by three interrelated  and fundamental questions. The ontological question “what is the form and nature of reality and,  therefore, what is there that can be known about it?” the epistemological question “What is the  relationship between the knower or would‐be knower and what can be known?” and finally the  methodological question “How can the inquirer […] go about finding out whatever he or she  believes can be known?”     Figure 2.1 – Basic beliefs of Alternative Inquiry Paradigms – Updated [Guba & Lincoln, 2000: pp.168] 
  21. 21.     9    However, there is no clear definition of these “paradigms”. The inquiry paradigms of Guba and  Lincoln could be argued that they are more approachable to social science study, due to several  referrals  as  to  “social  scientists  use  the  main  philosophical  concepts  in  very  different  ways”   [Erikssonn & Kovalainen, 2008]. A different option to the Alternative Inquiry Paradigms [Guba  and  Lincoln  1994],  is  available  for  research  conducted  within  business  areas.  There  are  alternatives such as [Arbnor & Bjerke, 2009] which define an operative paradigm instead of the  traditional, more commonly adopted Inquiry Paradigms. They, [Arbnor & Bjerke, 2009] motivate  their contribution to methodology studies by arguing on the fact that “an operative paradigm  relates a methodological view to a specific study area. […] It consists of two important parts:  methodical procedures and methodics. […] In our opinion, one cannot talk about a methodology  if the components mentioned above are merely described separately.” [Arbnor & Bjerke, 2009]  [Arbnor & Bjerke, 2009] argue on the premises that there has to be a difference between the  paradigm  and  the  way  it  is  applied.  While  [Guba  &  Lincoln,  1994,  2000]  come  with  some  established set of rules, [Arbnor & Bjerke, 2009] allow through the Operative paradigm a more  open groundwork for the researcher to express his scientific approach in accordance to his topic.     Figure 2.2 – Theory of Science and Methodologuy [Arbnor & Bjerke, 2009: pp.168]  Although, it is acknowledged the valuable contribution of Arbnor and Bjerke, this research is  going  to  use  as  defining  the  philosophical  approach,  Guba  and  Lincoln’s  Alternative  Inquiry  paradigms due to the following consideration:   Since Guba & Lincoln’s Inquiry paradigms are more close to the social science research topic, and  the theme is into extensive qualitative research in analyzing the phenomenon of “rewarding  failure as incentive for employees” the theme is somehow drawn closer to Guba & Lincoln, than  Arbnor & Bjerke. 
  22. 22.     10    Going back to [Guba & Lincoln, 2000] the Inquiry paradigms3  need to be presented before the  choice of philosophical stance is defined. A short note on the Inquiry paradigms is that they are  defined by the three fundamental questions as [Guba & Lincoln, 1994] argue.   By framing the three fundamental questions into the a table [cf. Fig 2.1], combined with the  inquiry paradigms, positivism can be defined as so that the knowledge on the world or reality  cannot  be  influenced  by  the  investigator,  and  that  the  investigator  and  the  “object  of  investigation”  has  to  be  treated  as  a  separate  entity.  Positivism  is  usually  attributed  as  a  philosophical  stance  to  research  conducted  in  a  quantitative  manner  where  hypothesis  are  elaborated and empirically tested for validation [Guba & Lincoln, 1994]. Postpositivism can be  argued as a loosened version of positivism but where critique is included against the basic version  of positivism [Erikssonn & Kovalainen, 2008]. Critical realism refers to a reality that “once existed  but it was shaped by a congeries of factors and then crystalized in a series of structures that now  are considered “real” [Guba & Lincoln, 1994]. [Johnson & Duberley, 2000] suggest that critical  realism can be used in multi‐methodological approaches, both qualitative and quantitative. On  the other hand, based on the assumption that the human mind being limited and flawed [Guba  & Lincoln, 1994], [Nygaard, 2005] draws perspectives on the problem that this can reflect in the  researcher’s objectivity towards the studied phenomenon or topic. Therefore in general it is more  attributed to the use in qualitative research. Constructivism is defined by not having a general  “reality” which cannot be argued for. Constructivism implies variations of reality, in multiple  constructions based on experiences, meanings and social constructions. The constructions are  simply less informed and/or sophisticated and also alterable as their various realities. [Guba &  Lincoln, 1994]  2.2 ONTOLOGY    Ontology can be defined as the perception of reality, where in positivism it is realist or “naïve  realism” perspective, in postpositivism critical realism has been the reality, in critical theory a  virtual reality or historical has been the assumed reality, modified by factors and crystallized over  time and lastly in constructivism relativism has been the assumed reality. Specifically constructed  ‐ in accordance to the view and meanings or participants. [Blaikie, 1993]  My philosophical stance in this research is constructivist. I believe in a reality that is dependent  of people and groups,  either organizations or research groups and their different meanings;  where  social,  cultural,  ethnic  etc.  values  are  at  the  core  of  one’s  “constructed  reality”.  The  constructivist approach was selected, due to its allowance of creating an independent value‐free  world. My choice of selection can be also traced back in literature and argued by the following:                                                               3  The participatory paradigm, contribution of [Heron & Reason, 1997] has been intentionally left out. The reason  behind this is that delimitations imposed by context of the researcher in conforming to rules. The Curriculum for  Study Program does not allow that much subjectivity to be present. 
  23. 23.     11    “Geertz’s (1988, 1993) prophecy about the “blurring of genres” is rapidly being fulfilled. Inquiry  methodology can no longer be treated as a set of universally applicable rules or abstractions […]  is  inevitably  interwoven  with  and  emerges  from  the  nature  of  particular  disciplines  […]  and  particular perspectives.” [Guba & Lincoln, 2000, pp. 164]   2.3 EPISTEMOLOGY    The epistemological question has the purpose of defining how can knowledge be produced and  accounted for by the researcher. The main difference is that while selecting an inquiry paradigm  and its accounted for ontological implication, the research cannot take place by shifting between  different epistemological stances while having a pre‐defined ontology [Guba & Lincoln, 1994].  This means that since in this case a constructivist approach has been selected and the ontology  defined  as  relativism,  the  epistemological  stance  cannot  be  objectivist,  as  in  a  positivist  approach. This simply means that the findings are considered “created” as shaped by the context  and the reality surrounding them.   Starting from there, the research was based on qualitative research, and therefore different  perceptions  from  different  source/actors.  This  contains  several  “realities”  according  to  the  sources values and it is acknowledged that the knowledge found and framed could not exist  without the individuals and their values.  2.4 METHODOLOGY    Methodology is the frame that guides the researcher in finding his answers. Again, as literature  shows, the methodological stance cannot be argued for, nor changed, once the inquiry paradigm  has been selected and ontology and epistemology alike [Guba & Lincoln, 1994]. This does not  mean that knowledge cannot be comprehended outside the selected “reality”. It simply means  that studying a certain problem, a research needs to be defined as qualitative, quantitative or  mixed‐methods. [Creswell, 2009] accounts for a constructivist approach being solely attributed  to qualitative approaches, however research shows that comprehending basic concepts through  deep qualitative methods [Burgess, 2004], can be verified later by quantitative study [Have,  2004].  While establishing the purpose and the research questions, the researcher must ask himself  about what methodology of conducting the research he will select. If the conclusion is that a  deeper understanding of the topic at hand is needed, then the qualitative research is the best  option. [Irby & Lunenburg, 2008].   [Creswell, 2007], argues:   “A  qualitative  study  is  defined  as  an  inquiry  process  of  understanding  based  on  distinct  methodological traditions of inquiry that explore a social or human problem.”  
  24. 24.     12    Researchers, who engage in this form of inquiry, support an inductive style, a focus on individual  meaning and the importance of altering and rendering the complexity of a situation. [Creswell,  2007]  [Guba  &  Lincoln,  1994],  argue  that  the  methodological  question  does  not  account  for  the  methods  used.  Methods  have  to  be  embedded  into  a  research  design  and  besides  the  philosophical implications, the research problem defines also the path towards a qualitative,  quantitative or mix‐method approach [Creswell, 2009]  By taking the research questions into account, they contain enough evidence to show that the  research is an exploratory one, in search for understanding, when the researcher does not know  variables which can be exanimated, there is no theory, or the theory existing does not apply to a  particular group/area which is a pre‐requisite. [Morse 1991]  This part is concluded by adding the methods of conducting this research into the research design  and their relevance to the research.   2.5 RESEARCH DESIGN    Based on the philosophical position, the considerations in regards to the research paradigm, and  the research questions, the chosen methodological approach as a qualitative one, the research  design  was  undertaken  as  an  exploratory  case  study  with  multiple  units  within  the  same  organization. However, there is also a comparative analysis which should be accounted for. Even  though comparative analysis is closely related to Grounded Theory cf. [Glaser & Strauss, 1967],  the research was not conducted as such. The arguments for this are presented in the discussion.    This thesis has been conducted in a 5 steps approach, each step contributing to the development  of  the  thesis.  For  every  step  the  overall  description  of  the  contribution  made  is  shown,  the  method  for  conducting  the  research  and  the  output  in  the  form  of  Research  Questions  or  Appendixes and Annexes.  Table 2.1 – Research Design of the thesis in five steps  Step  Method  Output  Introduction and Problem  Formulation    This step has been the  initiation step in conducting  this research. Testing the  literature, defining the  objectives and the research  problem    Literature review          Analytical:  Content analysis  Introduction and Problem  formulation    Appendix A     Annex A 1.1  Annex A 1.2 
  25. 25.     13    Scientific Paradigm,  Methodology and Research  Design    The second step contained  defining the philosophical  approach of this research,  the methods for conducting  it, and the Research Design of  the Thesis    Literature review            Synthesis  Research Design  Development of a  theoretical base of  knowledge for “rewarding  failure”    The third step was the  Development of a Theoretical  base of knowledge for  possible implementations of  “rewarding failure in  innovation attempts” within  the construction industry by  taking examples from other  industries    Literature review  Case study  Comparative method      Analytical  Content analysis      Empirical   Interviews        Synthesis  RQ 1            Appendix B            Annex B 3.1  Annex B 3.2  Annex B 3.3  Out setting the theory into  the construction sector  The fourth step was the  Development of a larger  Theoretical base of  knowledge for possible niches  of implementing rewarding  failure in the construction  sector by a historical example  of the application of LEAN  Construction and EDI    Literature review        Analytical  Content analysis          Synthesis    RQ 2  Appendix C  Final conclusions and  accumulation of knowledge  Identification of key common  mechanisms – Conceptual  model    Synthesis    Research conclusions  Development of a  Conceptual Framework 
  26. 26.     14    A perspective that has not been tackled yet is the reasoning in this research. Essentially there are  two basic methods of reasoning. Inductive and deductive reasoning; both have applications in  research  but  where  inductive  reasoning  is  more  open‐minded,  deductive  reasoning  is  more  narrow and concerned with testing hypothesis or theory.   The reasoning in this thesis is both inductive and deductive. While the applicability of inductive  reasoning is more related to the study case, the comparative analysis, the interview and content  analysis; deductive reasoning appears in testing the literature4  for various signs or gaps, where  applicability of an incentive system could take place.   Following the reasoning method in this research, a description of the steps is necessary:  Step 1  The  first  step  in  this  research  was  an  initiation  step.  The  exact  steps  of  the  process  are  summarized in [Appendix A – Methodology for Introduction]. In establishing a proper research  ground and topic, several issues were addressed. First of all, the initial idea of research came  from  an  external  source  [Sørensen,  2015].  Then,  the  construction  sector  general  status  was  tested in terms of innovation, and possible ideas were brainstormed of were answers could be  found.  The  methods  used  in  this  section  was  literature  review  and  content  analysis.  The  reasoning in this part was both inductive and deductive since the overall purpose was to establish  a  groundwork  and  test  the  current  situation  of  the  industry.  The  output  were  the  research  questions and Appendix A – Methodology for Introduction.   Step 2  The purpose of this step was to establish the philosophical stance, the paradigmatic implications,  and to create a research design for conducting this thesis based on the information obtained. The  output of this step was the research design.   Step 3  Here,  the  first  research  question  was  undertaken  in  the  study.  It  comprised  of  testing  the  theoretical and practical landscape of “rewarding failure as incentive for employees”. The exact  steps of the process are explained in [Appendix B – Rewarding failure in innovation processes. An  incentive program]. The overall purpose was to answer RQ 1. The reasoning level in this step was  both deductive, but by “testing the literature” and inductive due to inducing from the empirical  data gathered. First, the literature was tested for potential sources of data collection from real  cases. Second, once an organization has been selected, steps were undertaken in establishing  contact and obtaining data, by an exploratory case study with multiple units. Third, a comparative  analysis was made to establish and deduce several reoccurring themes from the data collected,                                                               4  Although literature attributes deductive reasoning to testing a hypothesis or theory, it should be emphasized that  it is literature that is tested, not theory. The amount of literature present in rewarding failure does not constitute  in my opinion a theory. 
  27. 27.     15    and fourth, a synthesis was done to develop the theoretical base of knowledge. The output was  Appendix B, and a clear answer to RQ 1.    Step 4  Step 4 comprised of an extensive literature review and content analysis. The exact steps for  conducting  the  research  can  be  seen  in  [Appendix  C  –  The  possibilities  of  the  construction  industry of learning by example]. The purpose of this working paper was to answer RQ 2. First,  the identification of literature was necessary for obtaining credible data. The reasoning level in  this  step  was  inductive.  Once  literature  has  been  reviewed,  content  analysis  revealed  the  potential areas for implementing a new incentive program; and how the construction industry  learns a different approach but still with the same principles and the same methods. The second  step was conducting an extensive analysis of where could an incentive system take place, in what  type of organizational setting, and how this is relevant to the construction industry by previous  implementations. The final step was synthetizing the findings into a larger theoretical base of  knowledge, where the incentive program could find its outset in the construction industry, by  using the industry’s current situation and advantages.  The output was a clear answer to RQ 2  and Appendix C.   Step 5  The final step of the thesis concluded with the accumulation of knowledge gained from the  research through the steps described above. The reasoning level in this step was inductive, due  to the accumulation of knowledge. A conceptual model for implementation of a new incentive  system in an organization was proposed and the conclusions were made.                      
  28. 28.     16    2.6 ASSESMENT OF THE RESEARCH DESIGN    Validity and trustworthiness is an important part of any research. The correct judgment of one’s  assumptions, data collection, and data analysis reflects on the overall research. The steps for  conducting the assessment of the research design are based on [Guba & Lincoln, 1981; Krefting  1991].  Step 1 – Introduction and Problem formulation  Credibility  Triangulation of sources  Transferability  Not applicable  Dependability  Dense/thorough description  Confirmability  Triangulation of data/sources   Reflexive analysis  Step 2 – Scientific paradigm, methodology and research design  Credibility  Peer‐reviewed  Transferability  Not applicable  Dependability  Dense/thorough description  Confirmability  Triangulation of data/sources  Reflexive analysis  Step 3 – Theoretical landscape for “rewarding failure”  Credibility  Triangulation of sources  Transferability  Nominated sample  Dependability  Dense/thorough description  Confirmability  Triangulation of data/sources  Reflexive analysis  Step 4 – Out setting the theory into the construction sector  Credibility  Triangulation of sources  Transferability  Not applicable  Dependability  Dense/thorough description  Confirmability  Triangulation of data/sources  Reflexive analysis  Step 5 – Accumulation of knowledge and final conclusions  Credibility  Triangulation of sources  Transferability  Dense description  Dependability  Dense/thorough description  Confirmability  Triangulation of data/sources  Reflexive analysis    Table 2.2 – Applied techniques for ensuring trustworthiness and validity     
  29. 29.     17    CHAPTER 3. DEVELOPMENT OF A THEORETICAL BASE OF KNOWLEDGE In  this  chapter,  all  of  the  main  research  carried  out  to  develop  a  conceptual  framework  on  rewarding failure in innovation attempts, and the way it was outset to the construction industry,  is presented. The first part of the chapter has the purpose of answering RQ 1 – Is rewarding failure  in innovation attempts done in other industries, and if so, how is it done?. The second part of the  chapter has the purpose of answering RQ 2 – How can the construction industry learn from other  industries by taking example?  This  chapter  contains  the  main  research  conducted  in  this  thesis.  The  papers  on  which  this  chapter is based, are Appendix B and Appendix C. During the chapter, the different methods and  the methodological approach cf. Table 2.1 are applied.   3.1 REWARDING FAILURE IN INNOVATION ATTEMPTS AS AN INCENTIVE  SYSTEM    This part of the thesis, covers the first research question [RQ 1]:  Is rewarding failure in innovation attempts done in other  industries, and if so, how is it done?  To understand better the concept behind an incentive system as “rewarding failure” and to test  the concept, a theoretical landscape was constructed through literature study. This has been  done, to gain a theoretical perspective on the topic and to obtain knowledge of industries and  organizations with this type of incentive system. The applied methodology was a case study with  multiple case units [Yin, 2009], and a comparative analysis [Glaser & Strauss, 1967]. For the full  work of this research, see [Appendix B ‐ Rewarding failure in innovation processes. An incentive  program].   3.1.1  TESTING THE THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL LANDSCAPE OF THE TOPIC  “REWARDING FAILURE IN INNOVATION”    In organizations of any type, innovation is slowly becoming a necessity for survival on the market.  Innovations, of any nature have shaped the modern management [Hamel, 2006]. Testing the  theoretical and practical ground of “rewarding failure in innovation attempts” implied both a  collection of empirical data, and literature review. The literature review process involved both a 
  30. 30.     18    collection of important articles by following [Levy & Ellis, 2006] steps, and content analysis. The  exact process can be seen in [cf. Annex 3.1 – Steps for data collection]  3.1.2  THE THEORETICAL LANDSCAPE OF THE TOPIC “REWARDING FAILURE IN  INNOVATION”    Through literature analysis one important article presented a case study on “rewarding failure”  at BMW factory in Regensburg, Germany. The relevance of this article is tied to the findings  presented.   [Kriegesmann  et.al,  2007]  developed  a  model on  “creative  failures”.  The  model  draws  some  perspectives on what types of reactions should be appropriate from the management according  to the errors.     Figure 3.1 – Flops, blunders and creative errors: types of errors, causes and consequences  [Kriegesmann et. al, 2007]  Their findings are based on the case study conducted at BMW, where a system of “Error of the  Month” was implemented, but was dropped due to management support. However, the relevant  aspect was that “creative errors” or “successful errors” were rewarded with a symbolic prize,  instead of being punished. The reasoning behind is:  “Error  tolerance”  should  be  replaced  by  a  differentiated  (indeed  intolerant!)  handling  of  deviations from routine processes.” [Kriegesmann et.al, 2007]. The point was that an employee  who disregards to a certain extend the organization’s policy towards innovation processes, by 
  31. 31.     19    taking a calculated risk should, in the event of failure not be punished but, rather encouraged to  further take calculated, sensible risks, in a spirit of optimism.   3.1.3  PARTIAL CONCLUSION    [Kriegesmann et. al, 2007] conclusions are that:   Behavioral latitude must be ensured so that innovative forces can be freed from routine  activities and decoupled from rigid structures. Similarly, resources need to have space  from counterproductive control and regulatory systems.    However this latitude can quickly degenerate into “a playground” unless the incentives  related to the tasks itself and their implementation are of a sensitive and careful manner.  [Kriegesmann  et.  al,  2007]  recommend  “upward  career  mobility  or  the  prospect  of  challenging and rewarding projects in the future”  Another important conclusion not really underlined by the case study is the fact that instead of  a financial reward, a personal present was awarded to emphasize the commitment. Further  literature showed, that a financial incentive system is to be used cautiously even in successful  implementation cases, due to negative outcomes [Georgellis et.al, 2011; Bysted & Jespersen,  2014].  The next step of the research was to approach an organization which could provide empirical  data  in  the  form  of  semi‐structured  interviews,  in  order  to  conduct  the  case  study  through  appropriate methods.   3.1.4 TESTING THE PRACTICAL LANDSCAPE OF THE TOPIC “REWARDING  FAILURE IN INNOVATION” – CASE STUDY AT TATA GROUP    This  section,  follows  up  the  information  gathered  through  literature  review.  The  applied  methodology in this part of the thesis, as explained in [cf. Sect. 2.5, Step 3] is an exploratory case  study with multiple case units. The full collection of results can be seen [cf. Appendix B]. The  complete process, step by step can be seen [Annex 3.1].   TATA Group, with over 100 independent operating companies is a leader in the corporate world  and has a program which fosters innovation processes within the organization, called InnoVista.  [TATA  InnoVista].  The  program  has  a  range  of  awards,  which  can  be  defined  as  incentive  mechanisms meant to encourage the innovation process within the organization. The case study  has focused on one type of award – “Dare to Try Award”.   “‘Dare to try’ award category of InnoVista, which recognizes sincere and audacious attempts at  innovation that failed to get the desired result. […]The growing number of entries in this category  (from 12 in 2007 to 174 in 2014) indicates that we have been successful in encouraging people to  experiment and innovate.” [Gopalakrishnan, 2014]. The award was created based on the same 
  32. 32.     20    literature and case study presented before, so it was considered to be even more relevant to the  thesis purpose of studying this phenomenon. The two case units are Jaguar Land Rover Ltd.5  and  TATA Consultancy Services.6    3.1.5  CASE STUDY RESULTS – THE PRACTICAL LANDSCAPE    The following section will present the findings concluded through the case study. The two sets of  answers from the case units are summarized below:   Jaguar Land Rover Ltd.    “Daring to Try” without fear is helpful as a precursor to innovation – taking chances.    The recognition of “failure” in “Dare to Try” is mostly after the event. Therefore it does  not contribute in developing an innovation culture directly.    People apply for the award in order to make from failure “a success” but they rather have  succeeded in the first place.    “Dare  to  Try”  should  be  a  motto  of  an  innovation  strategy  and  should  be  rewarded  directly.    Companies prefer “low hanging fruits” but they do not take chances by doing so   The biggest issue is to resource “Dare to Try”   TCS (TATA Consultancy Services)   Dare to Try rewards failure and thus encourages risk taking. Risk taking is a precursor for  a culture of innovation.    Most companies want to progress on assured success only.    It requires management support.   The ideas are judged for recognition based on their effort.    The team should also plan going again for it.    “Dare to Try” is mostly used to attract management attention and revive failed projects   “Dare to Try” should not be necessary a motto for an innovation culture but an innovation  culture should accept failure as a pillar to success rather than punish it.   The biggest setback of Dare to try is that unless this process is continuing, failures are  hidden and it causes deterioration of the innovation culture.     The overall impression was that several themes were re‐occurring within the literature and the  themes  emerging  from  the  content  analysis.  Therefore,  the  next  step  was  made  as  a  methodological approach with the objective of testing both the theoretical landscape and the  practical  landscape.  This  has  been  done  for  a  better  comprehension  and  extraction  of  key                                                               5  http://www.jaguarlandrover.com/gl/en/   6  http://www.tcs.com/Pages/default.aspx  
  33. 33.     21    mechanisms for how an incentive system such as “rewarding failure within innovation attempts”  could be developed more.   3.1.6 PARTIAL CONCLUSION     By applying a Grounded Theory methodology such as comparative analysis [Glaser & Strauss,  1967]7 , the answers from the case study were then used together the content analysis from the  literature study [Kriegesmann, 2007]. The questions asked in the interviews were attributed an  answer from the two case units, and a generated impression of what the answer is from the  literature review.   The full comparative analysis can be seen in [Appendix B].   The  generated  themes  were  somehow  in  agreement  between  the  sources,  however  disagreement also occurred in two cases and two results need more extensive research. The  generated themes were coded into mechanisms and challenges. These results are summarized  below:  Mechanisms for conducting an incentive program such as “rewarding failure”   Innovation culture   Management support   Effort recognition   Employee perception   Recognition of failure  Challenges for conducting an incentive program such as “rewarding failure”   Continuous management support   Behavioral latitude   It should be noted that the management support even though it is a mechanism it also has to be  considered as the biggest challenge. Without management support, literature supports that such  an incentive program fails [Kriegesmann et.al, 2007].   The discovery of these key mechanisms and challenges faced by the adoption and/or rejection of  an incentive system such as “rewarding failure” was the objective of RQ 1. Therefore the research  continued in search of obtaining an answer to RQ 2 for developing the conceptual framework,  which was the thesis’ ultimate purpose.                                                                7  A very important note. Although [Glaser & Strauss, 1967] define this methodology as that the collected data is  compared, coded, and re‐coded again; in this situation the data was coded into themes once. Second of all the  data collected from the literature review is not the collected data from the case study as [Glaser & Strauss, 1967]  should be used for comparative analysis. It is merely data generated by content analysis.   
  34. 34.     22    3.2 THE POSSIBILITIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OF LEARNING BY  EXAMPLE    This part of the thesis, covers the second research question [RQ 2]:  How can the construction industry learn from other  industries by taking example?  The thesis covered so far, the theoretical and practical landscape of an incentive system within  the field of Innovation Management – Rewarding failure as an incentive for employees. Through  the analysis made in [cf. Sect. 3.1], mechanisms were identified, for the adoption and applicability  of this incentive system in an organization. However, the challenge of implementation within the  construction industry was undertaken in this section of the thesis.    The issue of implementation was undertaken as a qualitative study, based on [cf. Appendix B].  The full analysis can be seen also in [cf. Appendix B]. To advance in the study, steps were taken  to comprehend and develop a theoretical landscape for the applicability of the incentive system,  by the advantages of the construction industry in terms of learning as [Winch, 2003] argued.   In order to do this, a historical perspective on the adoption of a process already implemented  was needed to extract key mechanisms, which the construction industry needed for its adoption.  This step in the thesis is argued for in the next sub‐chapter.   3.2.1  LITERATURE STUDY  In order to identify a system, which has been learned by the construction industry, the initial  information gathered in the background information was used. [Winch, 2003] accounted for the  learning industry, however, he also draw perspectives by comparison with the Lean processes  implementation within the construction industry. The literature search was conducted in order  to obtain theoretical data on the implementation process and to identify mechanisms which  contributed to the implementation, and barriers.   The  literature  study  was  done  in  three  steps.  The  first  step  involving  search  strings  in  the  American Society of Civil Engineers database8  by combination of keywords with different filters  applied gave 260 articles. An important filter applied to the search was that the article type had  to be research article, peer‐reviewed, to ensure more credibility to the information that was  going to be extracted. Since the result was 260 articles, a rough selection was made to reduce                                                               8  ASCE is an important database in the academic world. It contains peer‐reviewed articles, journals, conference  papers of the highest academic quality.  
  35. 35.     23    the amount of articles. 45 relevant articles were then analyzed by an abstract review, and the list  was shortened down to 5 important articles.   The second step was to analyze the articles for their reliability by using the analytical program  NVivo. The steps are detailed in [cf. Appendix B]. The third step, was the literature review and  coding of themes from where key mechanisms were extracted which were considered beneficial  in the adoption process of Lean processes and also barriers.     3.2.2  ADOPTION OF LEAN CONSTRUCTION FROM THE MANUFACTURING  INDUSTRY9   In this sub‐chapter, the main considerations and important information regarding the adoption  of Lean processes are underlined.   More than being called a fundamental change in the industry, researchers agree that it is more  than that; it is “a paradigm shift” [Thaís et. al,2012; Tommelein, 2015]. Since these assumptions  are  shared  by  researchers  in  their  study  conducted  so  far  –  to  present  date;  it  is  strongly  recommended  to  consider  the  Lean  Construction10   as  the  first  real  change  done  by  the  construction industry by obviously applying principles derived from the manufacturing industry.  [Sullivan, 2011].  When a construction project delivers maximum value to the customer and in the same time it  minimizes waste, it is considered “a lean project” [Ballard & Howell, 2003]. [Ballard & Howell,  2003] conclude that construction projects are temporary production systems and this can be  traced back to initial research found, whether they are called complex or not [Ballard & Howell,  2003; Winch, 2003]. While visiting the Detroit Ford Plant, Eiji Toyoda, president of Toyota at that  point, studying the outset of the plant, concluded that his company should be using all resources,  including space, time, tools and human effort to a minimum; but in the same time maximizing  the output [Sullivan, 2011]. The relation to the manufacturing industry for this reason is obvious.  It was not the actual lean process derived from that point in time, but the lean philosophy.    3.2.3  THE THEORETICAL LANDSCAPE OF LEAN CONSTRUCTION ADOPTION  The significance of conducting the literature review, was that it provided the opportunity to  encode themes according to the literature, and extract key mechanisms and barriers which the  Lean construction adoption faced and is still facing. The results of the literature review account  for the importance of determining which factors, were contributing to the adoption process. This  step was important because it provided the theoretical landscape of Lean Construction adoption                                                               9  A small note is that “Lean construction refers to the application of lean thinking to the delivery of capital projects  in the architecture‐engineering‐construction (AEC) industry.” [Tommelein, 2015].   10  The term Lean construction was preferred for use in this thesis from this point, as opposed to Lean processes  etc. While many processes and models have emerged from the adoption of Lean philosophy, an overall meaning  was needed. [Ballard & Howell, 2003] 
  36. 36.     24    within  the  Construction  industry.  The  significance  of  the  theoretical  landscape  and  the  mechanisms and barriers is that they contribute to a general overview, on what factors affect “a  paradigm shift” within the construction industry.   To be accounted for, the notion of “paradigm shift” is important because it encompasses a radical  innovation within the construction industry, an unusual tendency. [Slaughter, 1998] argued that  most  of  innovations  happening  in  the  construction  industry  are  rather  incremental.  But  the  adoption  of  Lean  Construction  can  be  extrapolated  to  the  EDI  theory  were  in  a  historical  perspective the adoption of such a system is a radical innovation [Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010].   3.2.4 PARTIAL CONCLUSION  As explained, key mechanisms for the implementation of Lean Construction, and also barriers  were extracted through the literature study, where themes were encoded. The results are the  following:   DRAWBACKS:    The application of lean to an entire industry involved first and foremost the issue that the  construction industry delivers different products with no clear definition of what is value  for the customer, while the manufacturing industry can easily define the quality and value  of a finite product for a customer.   The second issue encountered was the “control”. While construction industry evaluates  results by looking backward to a project already finished and assessing the results, the  manufacturing industry can overcome that issue by preventing and foreseeing any issue  by looking forward, acting directly on the process [Sullivan, 2011]   Inexperience of work force   Resistance to change of employees   Unavailability of products on the market [Ozorhon et. al, 2014]   Misunderstanding of Lean principles; employees tend to misunderstand the whole point  and they mix the meaning for example LPS (Last Planner System) with Lean thinking.   Lack of commitment from the foremen   Confusion of Lean as Building Information Modeling (BIM) combined with Virtual Design  Construction (VDC) [Thaís et. al, 2012]    KEY MECHANISMS:    Project participants were integrated through partnering of the contractor with the user‐ client   Commitment of leadership towards adoption of innovative measures [Ozorhon et. al,  2014]   Concept mapping to negotiate meanings (merely a tool for better communication)   Organizational learning 
  37. 37.     25     Action learning in the form of regular meetings – “problem solving method” [Hirota et. al,  1999]    One interesting remark is to be done though. While reviewing the literature for the needed  information,  an  auxiliary  information  came  through  as  well.  As  a  precursor  for  learning,  organizations need to “unlearn” outdated practices and discard them to make room for better  ones. [Thaís et. al, 2012]    The partial conclusion presented here, is based upon an extensive literature study. The relevance  of the findings are connected to the next sub‐chapter, which tests Employee‐Driven innovation  for a potential fostering environment of “rewarding failure”  3.2.5  TESTING EMPLOYEE‐DRIVEN INNOVATION FOR A POTENTIAL FOSTERING  ENVIRONMENT  This step, emphasizes an important part of this research. While conducting the literature review,  and  testing  the  theory  for  possible  niches  of  implementing  an  incentive  program  such  as  “rewarding failure in innovation attempts”, the Employee‐Driven Innovation methodology came  in  the  literature  several  times.  The  choice  for  a  further  analysis  and  testing  whether  it  is  a  potential fostering environment is argued on several considerations.   Employee‐Driven Innovation, is an approach focused on innovation within an organization, by  using the employee’s spoken and tacit knowledge in terms of new products, methods, processes.  It focuses on the employees’ creativity, which by support from management and giving them  temporary authority, can develop new tools, structures, and processes to optimize within an  organization. [Sørensen, 2015; Høyrup, 2010]  Due to the fact that EDI is based on improving the innovation process within an organization, by  using  the  employees’  knowledge  in  generating  innovative  ideas,  it  has  been  considered  an  approachable theory for a possible implementation of an incentive system such as “rewarding  failure  in  innovation  attempts”.  Another  consideration  is  the  necessity  of  support  from  management. The literature study, shows evidence of a theoretical framework of conducting EDI,  content data from a framework for conducting EDI in a large project based organization within  the construction industry in Denmark [Sørensen, 2015], and experiences from the Norwegian  work life [Aasen et. al, 2012].  From  a  theoretical  point  of  view,  Employee‐Driven  Innovation  can  have  five  main  drivers  in  decisions about innovation within an organization [Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010]. Figure 3.2 illustrates  how an ideal type organizational structure which fosters EDI would work.       
  38. 38.     26        Figure 3.3 – Ideal type organizational structure of conducting EDI [Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010]  Drawing some perspectives on the framework, there are four main essential conditions that need  to be taken into account for, and needed for EDI to work.   Potential and limits of employee participation   Idea generation   Drivers of employee participation   Management support    Having in mind these 4 essential conditions before going further with any analysis, one of the  main drivers for employee participation in this framework are “incentives”. [Kesting & Ulhøi,  2010] argue that if the employees are not rewarded for their efforts, they have no extrinsic  incentives to come up with ideas and only intrinsic incentives remain. From a more practical point 
  39. 39.     27    of view and in a shorter version of Figure 3.4 [Aasen et.al, 2012] present results concluded from  an analysis into practical examples from the Norwegian work‐life. Their case study units were  ranging from the construction industry to public administration and defense.      Figure 3.4 – Interrelated elements of EDI [Aasen et.al, 2012]    Another important literature study was an exploratory case study by [Sørensen, et.al, 2014]. They  key mechanisms extracted, are presented in [Sect. 3.2.6] together with a partial conclusion.  3.2.6  PARTIAL CONCLUSION    The key mechanisms, which are can be concluded from the literature review on EDI are:   Management – [Sørensen et.al, 2014] both through field testing, and literature review  concludes that this is the main theme important for a framework. As study points out,  management is required to be of constant support, skilful in communication, ready to  empower employees and recognition. [Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010; Aasen et.al, 2012] support  all this.   Knowledge sharing – indication in [Sørensen et.al, 2014]  was that employees seemed to  agree  when  approached  about  it,  that  knowledge  sharing  would  be  a  key  factor  in  conducting  EDI, however no indication exists  of employees doing so actively through  gathering of employees for example.   Organizational  culture  –  not  only  [Sørensen  et.al,  2014]  found  through  research  that  organizational culture is a key mechanism, but also [Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010; Aasen et.al,  2012] support this.    Employee motivation and education – as previously, all sources [Sørensen et.al, 2014;  Kesting & Ulhøi, 2010; Aasen et.al, 2012] seem to agree that employee motivation is an  important  contributing  key  mechanism  to  conducting  EDI.  An  important  factor  to  be  taking into account here, concluded by [Sørensen et.al, 2014] is that not all employees 
  40. 40.     28    are motivated by incentives, but that some employees could be satisfied with the current  situation. This seems to be in some sort of alignment with [Kriegesmann et.al 2007] which  argue that 10‐20% of employees venture into new territory. It can be extrapolated to  incentives as well. Not all incentives work, and definitely not on all people.   Process – This area has not really been explored neither in literature, neither in practice.  [Sørensen et.al, 2014] draw some perspectives on this, but more research is needed on  how to give more importance to the processes needed in conducting EDI.    A partial conclusion that should be drawn here, is to account for the many inter‐related elements  which seem to always entangle in the various applications and frameworks of EDI. The relevance  of  this  step,  was  that  through  literature  analysis,  it  is  has  been  demonstrated  how  lean  construction adoption process does not seem to differ very much from the process of EDI. The  difference is, that the construction industry has already drawn conclusions and learned from the  applicability of Lean processes.   As history shows, Lean Construction has been learned by the construction sector and it is still in  process of being learned. By a comparison, EDI is in the state of Lean Construction some decades  ago, and this is a problem. But that does not mean, that there is no hope. As research has shown,  the construction industry can learn and so it did when it came to Lean principles even though the  process  is  far  from  completion.  By  looking  into  the  problems  arisen  over  time  and  in  the  implementation process, much has been understood. Some of the key mechanisms related to  both the implementation of Lean and EDI interrelate and are:    All project participants need to be actively involved in any radical innovation. They need  to have first a theoretical background of what exactly they are trying to implement, and  then according to their roles, they have different needs for being motivated to participate.    Depending on the role of the participant within a project organization or set‐up, different  needs  are  in  effect;  employees  need  constant  support  from  the  management,  and  feedback.  Not  only  they  need  support,  but  they  need  to  still  be  managed,  while  the  management loosens the chain and allows for some spare time on just individual learning.  As explained before, individual learning is organizational learning.    There is a great need for better communication tools/skills between the participants.  Misunderstanding of a certain process, literature shows, is quite common and therefore  should be avoided.   Last but not least, employees need extra motivation in the form of incentive systems from top  management in order to make sure that their attention is retained in face of the new challenge.  Through the study of chapter 3.2, RQ 2 was tackled and a clear answer would be that the key  mechanisms  for  the  implementation  of  Lean,  seem  to  align  with  the  key  mechanisms  of  implementing EDI. Therefore, through a historical comparison, and by taking into consideration 
  41. 41.     29    the history of radical innovations in the construction industry, or “paradigm shifts”, potential  systems which could benefit the industry, can be learned from other industries.   On an even higher importance is that, “rewarding failure in innovation attempts” seems to have  a  place  within  an  EDI  framework.  The  final  chapter  of  the  thesis,  summarizes  the  partial  conclusions drawn from the research.   CHAPTER 4. DEVELOPMENT OF CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM WITHIN AN ORGANIZATION This chapter, presents the accumulation of knowledge in the form of a synthesis based on chapter  3, cf. [Appendix B; Appendix C]. The chapter relates to all the partial conclusions drawn through  the previous chapter.   The  construction  industry  is  facing  once  again  a  paradigm  shift.  Innovation  processes  have  become increasingly more important due to the potential they have, and the industry is starting  to realize that.   This research was based on the premises that people and organizations are all different and  therefore their realities can differ. In the search for obtaining the best answers possible for the  two research questions, similar patterns have been re‐occurring and some were differing.  The  process of answering the research questions, was interesting to follow, as it took the research,  through  various  disciplines  in  the  search  of  developing  a  conceptual  framework  for  the  implementation of an incentive program such as “rewarding failure”.   Through  this  research,  some  key  mechanisms  were  identified  for  conducting  an  incentive  program such as “rewarding failure” [RQ 1]. Once this step was resolved, the dilemma of how the  construction  industry  learns  was  undertaken. Through  an  extensive  literature  study,  the  key  mechanisms extracted for the learning industry were related once to:   The  historical  perspective  of  how  Lean  Construction  has  been  adopted  by  the  Construction Industry.    The  key  mechanisms  for  conducting  EDI  in  an  organization,  and  outsets  in  the  construction industry have been already defined.   The final step, is to synthesize these results into a conceptual framework for how “rewarding  failure as an incentive mechanism” fits the methodology of EDI.    

×