Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

Organizatrional and career development

41 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

Personnel Management

Veröffentlicht in: Bildung
  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

Organizatrional and career development

  1. 1. Management and Organizational Development  Management Development Process Determining the Net Management Requirements - Organizational Objectives - Management Inventory and Succession Plan - Changes in the Management Team
  2. 2. Management and Organizational Development  Establishing Management Development Objectives  Methods used in Management Development - Understudy assignments - Coaching - Special Projects and Committee Assignments - University and Professional Association Seminars - Classroom Training - In-Basket Technique - Business simulation - Adventure learning - Experience - Job rotation
  3. 3. Management and Organizational Development  Evaluation of Management Development Activities  Assessment Centers  Organizational Development - Diagnosis - Strategy Planning - Education - Evaluation
  4. 4. Career Development  Why is career development necessary?  Who is responsible for career development? - Organization’s Responsibility - Employee’s Responsibility - Manager’s Responsibility
  5. 5. Websites  www.hr2000.com  www.caso.com  www.tcm.com/trdev  www.deped.gov.ph  www.neap.deped.gov.ph
  6. 6. Webpage  http://oser.state.wi.us  http://www.doleta.gov/reports/papers/tbl_paper_f inal.pdf  http://www.cpmacademy.org  http://www.exxonmobil.com
  7. 7. Books  Needs Analysis Survey: New Supervisor Training, State of Wisconsin, Department of Employee Relations, 2001  The History of the Certified Public Manager, Thomas H Patterson, 2014  Academy of Management Review, TP Ference, et al, 1977 Academy of Management (NY)
  8. 8. Articles & Journals  Technology-Based Learning Strategies, Vinz Koller et at 2014  “Psychological Biases May Influence Feedback on Evaluations” Training and Development 67, no.11 Nov 2013, p 12  “Training Managers for Their Role in a Career Development System” Trading and Development July 1981 p 74  “Custom Careers” HR Magazine June 2013, pp 54-56  “Unambitious Workers Still Need a Plan” Canadian HR Reporter June 15, 2009 p 16
  9. 9. Articles & Journals  “Employee Development Is a Great Business Opportunity” Human Resource Management Industrial Digest, 20.6 (2012) pp 27-30  “Best Morale to Gain Productivity” HR Magazine, February 1993 pp 46 – 49  “State to Use $12M Grant to Offer Online Career Counseling” McClatchy-Tribune Business New, June 22, 2012  “New Kids on the Block” HR Magazine, October 2013 pp 34 – 36, 40
  10. 10. Career Development  Implementing Career Development - Individual Assessment National Competency-Based Teacher Standards (NCBTS) Teachers’ Strength and Needs Assessment (TNSA) Individual Plan for Professional Development (IPPD)  Assessment by the Organization - Individual Performance Commitment Review (IPCRF)  Communicating Career Options  Career Pathing  Career Self-Management  Career Counseling
  11. 11. Career Development  Reviewing Career Progress  Career-Related Myths - Myths held by Employees - Myths held by Managers  Dealing with Career Plateaus - Rehabilitating Ineffective Plateauees - Career Lattices - The Impact of Dual-Employed Couples and Single-Parent Employees - Outplacement - Breaking the Glass Ceiling - Career Development Online
  12. 12. MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS concerned with developing the experience, attitudes and skills necessary to become or remain an effective manager must have the full support of the organization’s top executive to be successful designed, conducted and evaluated on the basis of the objectives of the organization, the needs of the individual managers to be developed and anticipated changes in the organization’s management tea,
  13. 13. Needs Management Requirements (quality and quantity of managers needed) Needs Assessment Management Development Objectives Management Development Programs Evaluation of Programs Management Inventory and Succession Plan Organizational Objectives Changes in the Management Team MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
  14. 14. Determining the Net Management Requirements ORGANIZATIONAL OBJECTIVES play a significant role in determining requirements for managers rapid expansion program calls for new managers at all levels if growth is limited, few managers may be needed but the skills of the present management team may need to be upgraded
  15. 15. Determining the Net Management Requirements MANAGEMENT INVENTORY is a specialized and expanded form skills inventory for the organization’s current management team it includes basic personal and professional information includes brief assessment of past performance and potential for advancement
  16. 16. Determining the Net Management Requirements MANAGEMENT INVENTORY is a specialized and expanded form skills inventory for the organization’s current management team it includes basic personal and professional information includes brief assessment of past performance and potential for advancement
  17. 17. Determining the Net Management Requirements MANAGEMENT INVENTORY cab be used to fill vacancies That occur unexpectedly like those that resulted from death Or resignation. another use is in planning the development needs of Individual managers and using these plans to pinpoint development activitis for the toal organization
  18. 18. Name Present Position Length of Service Retirement Year Replace ment Positions Previous Training Amorganda, Albert E SP II 29 2029 SP III NEAP- SHDP Cabrera, Ermina R HT III 18 2040 ESP I NEAP- SHDP Cabrera, Virginia D SP IV 28 2030 ES I Int Mgmt Galleposo, Gabriel T SP II 18 2040 SP III NEAP- SHDP Mangubat, Jimmy D HT I 18 2040 HT II Int Mgmt Tarnate, Antonio A ESP I 33 2025 SP II NEAP- SHDP Tipo, Jison P T III 8 2050 HT I Int Mgmt Yabo, Jose ESP I 30 2028 SP II NEAP- SHDP Sample of a Simplified Management Inventory
  19. 19. Determining the Net Management Requirements Management Succession Plan (Replacement Chart/ Schedule) is a management tool that evolved from Management Inventory scheme. it records potential successors for each manager within the organization. the format is similar to Management Inventory and may contain simply list of positions and potential replacemet
  20. 20. Determining the Net Management Requirements Management Succession Plan (Replacement Chart/ Schedule) may also contain other information such as length of service, retirement data, past performance evaluations and salary Management Inventory and Succession Plans are generally kept confidential and can be computerized, maintained by HRD for use of top executives of the organization
  21. 21. Sample of a Simplified Management Inventory Schools Division Superintendent NATIVIDAD P BAYUBAY, CESO VI OLIVER B TALAOC, Ed D JERRY B BOKINGKITO ROSMINDO L ANCHETA Assistant SDS OLIVER B TALAOC, Ed D EVELYN F IMPORTANTE JERRY B BOKINGKITO Don GABRIEL T GALLEPOSO Chief, CID EVELYN F IMPORTANTE HOPE ACUESTA JOSEPH CASTRO VALERIANO FUGOSO Chief, SGOD JERRY B BOKINGKITO ELIZETHA EVARDO FERLYN ALVARADO PRELYN PALLON Planning & Research GLORIFE CLAVERO FERLYN ALVARADO PRELYN PALLON VALERIANO FUGOSO HRMO REZ ROY RAMOS JISON P TIPO JIMMY D MANGUBAT ERMINA R CABRERA Accounting Section MARYBETH LAGROMA JOY LORENA MAATA MA FE MALINTAD GANIEDITH YABO Finance Section TERESITA INGCONG MERILYN SALADA VIVIAN UGBAMIN JENEVY LABAO Supply Section FE LADJA ROGER YATOR JERRY SARMIENTO ROMEL APDUHAN Records Section ESPERANZA HERMOSO MYRNA SARMIENTO SHIELA TINGO LUZ SALAVE
  22. 22. Determining the Net Management Requirements CHANGES IN THE MANAGEMENT TEAM can be estimated fairly accurately and easily while others are not so easily determined. Changes such as retirements can ne predicted from the information in the management inventory deaths, resignation and discharges are difficult to forecast when these changes occur, the MI & SP can be used to help fill the vacancies.
  23. 23. Needs Assessment every organization has physical, financial and human resource needs a fundamental need of any organization is the need for an effective management team to meet this need, use of a well-organized management development program is advised
  24. 24. Needs Assessment before management development activities are undertaken, the specific development needs of managers in the organi- zation must be determined needs assessment is a systematic analysis of the specific management development activities the organization requires to achieve its objectives
  25. 25. Needs Assessment TRAINING NEEDS SURVEY focuses on the knowledge and skills required in performing the job COMPETENCY STUDIES examine the competencies required in performing the managerial job TASK ANALYSIS is concerned with what tasks are required in performing the managerial job PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS deals with the job performance requirements in performing the managerial job
  26. 26. Needs Assessment TRAINING NEEDS SURVEY what Knowledge/Skill is required? Approach: ask key people what KS they think performers require to do their job & prioritize the KS recommended and summarize as a topical list, training agenda, curriculum, etc Advantage: fast, inexpensive, broad involvement, low risk, low visibility Disadvantage: not precise of specific, based on opinion, difficult to validate and set priorities, difficult to relate to output, to evaluate importance of training, and an implicit expectation that you will deliver it
  27. 27. Needs Assessment COMPETENCY STUDY what competencies are required? Approach: ask key people what Cs they think performers require to do their job, determine KS required to attain the stated competencies and prioritize recommended KS and summarize as a training agenda or curriculum Advantage: relatively fast, inexpensive, broad involvement, consensus, generic needs covering broad population Disadvantage: difficult to: relate to output, evaluate training, assess relative importance of competencies, set priorities for KS input & will not identify the critical difference between exemplary and average performance and factors influencing it
  28. 28. Needs Assessment TASK ANALYSIS what tasks are required? Approach: determine what tasks are required of the trainee to be performed correctly/successfully, determine KS required to correctly perform the tasks identified, KS is summarized to training design, training agenda, curriculum Advantage: precise identification of tasks, a form of output and can be measured, objective, validated by observation Disadvantage: takes time and skill, difficult to assess relative importance of tasks, does not address other factors affecting performance
  29. 29. Needs Assessment PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS what job performance required? Approach: determine: performance required, accomplish- ments, KS required to correctly perform identified tasks, other factors that influence job performance & summarize KS as a training design, training agenda, or curriculum Advantage: links KS to job performance, can be validated, evalauated, address other factors, can prioritize KS input Disadvantage: takes time and skill, visible
  30. 30. Establishing Management Development Objectives OBJECTIVES for the overall management development program and for individual programs must be established to meet management development needs of the organization. objectives should be expressed in writing and should be measurable
  31. 31. Establishing Management Development Objectives Training objectives can be categorized within 3 areas which can also be used for management development objectives that are needed for the principles, facts and concepts to be learned in the management development program Instructional Objectives incorporate targets relating to the number of trainees, number of hours, cost per trainee and the time required of them to reach a standard level of knowledge
  32. 32. Establishing Management Development Objectives Organizational and Departmental Objectives concern on the impact the programs will have on organizational and departmental outcomes such as absenteeism, turnover, safety, and number of grievances Individual and Personal Growth Objectives concern on the impact on the behavioral and attitudinal outcomes of the individual. After all these objectives are developed, course content and method of instruction can be specified.
  33. 33. How IBM develop its managers. IBM has invested a large-scale in-house plan to train employees and managers at all levels and functions within the company. Training program use the following styles: - Outline Information Delivery – on the company’s intranet, participants can choose the information they need when they need it. - Gaming and Simulation – a media-based activities that allows participants to apply gained knowledge to real life on-the-job situations. - Teamwork – these activities include online groups of co- workers in virtual classroom where they take part in discussions or tasks facilitated in the area. HRM IN ACTION
  34. 34. - Traditional Classroom Sessions – learning is face-to- face in these sessions. Coworkers and a facilitator build in prior activities, and look into case studies, and strengthen the sense of teamwork and community. Sessions cover topics such as IBM company policies, leadership skills and productivity. Upon completion of the activities, the managers undergo an online assessment as well as assessment on how well they might apply their gained knowledge on the job. HRM IN ACTION
  35. 35. Methods Used in Management Development After the organization’s needs has been assessed and its objectives stated, management development programs can now be implemented Methods to be employed in carrying-out the program should be carefully selected to match the desired outcomes which anchored on the organization’s objectives. These methods are classified into 2 general categories based on the principles of learning:
  36. 36. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job training methods are those which are given to the employees within the everyday working of a concern. The motto of such training is “learning by doing.” This includes understudy assignments, coaching, experience, job rotation, special projects and committee assignments.
  37. 37. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job training methods are those in which training is provided away from the actual working condition. It is also called as vestibule training, i.e., the employees are trained in a separate area ( may be a hall, entrance, reception area, etc. known as a vestibule) where the actual working conditions are duplicated, classroom training, lectures, case studies, role playing, in-basket technique, adventure learning, business simulation, university and professional association seminars and web-based training.
  38. 38. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job Understudy Assignments are used to develop individual’s capacity to fill a specific job, works for the incumbent and usually given the title assistant. The heir realizes the purpose of the training and can learn in a practical and realistic situation without directly being responsible for operating result. The negative side of this method is that the understudy learns the bad practices of the incumbent. It is generally supplemented with one or more of the other management development methods.
  39. 39. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job Coaching is usually carried out by experienced managers, emphasizes the responsibility of all managers for developing employees. Experienced managers advise and guide trainees in solving managerial problems. Trainees are allowed to develop their own approaches to management with the counsel of a more experienced manager. There is danger that the coach will neglect training responsibilities or pass on inappropriate management practices.
  40. 40. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job DepEd LPP or Learning Partnership Program is a coaching method required by the department from Master Teachers. Selection process of the learning partner is done through the NCBTS and the curriculum and instructional delivery competence as observed by the principal. This method is advantageous to teachers who are coping with certain aspects in curriculum implementation. The learning program may span across the whole school year or for only a couple of months depending on the progress of the mentee. Coaching
  41. 41. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job Experience Many organizations use development through experience. Individuals are promoted into management jobs and allowed to learn on their own from their daily experiences. The individual, in attempting to perform the job, may recognize the need for management development and look for a means of satisfying it. However, the individual who are allowed to learn management only through experience can create serious problems by making mistakes. It is also frustrating to attempt to manage without the necessary background and knowledge.
  42. 42. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job Job Rotation is designed to give an individual broad experience through exposure to many different areas of the organization. This method allows the trainee to experience from one job to another within the organization, generally remaining in each from 6 months to a year. Large organizations frequently use this technique for training recent college graduates. The trainee can see how management principles can be applied in a cross section of environments and allows the trainee to become familiar with the entire operation of the company.
  43. 43. Methods Used in Management Development On the Job Special Projects and Committee Assignments require the trainee to learn about a particular subject. Ex. If told to develop a training program on safety, the trainee would have to acquire learning about the organization’s present safety policies and problems and the safety training procedures used by other companies. The trainee must also learn to work with and relate to other employees. If organizatoin has regularly constituted ad hoc committees, the trainee develops skills in working with others and learns through the activities of the committee.
  44. 44. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Classroom Training is a most familiar kind of training that can utilize several methods. It is used not only in management development but also in the orienting and training activities Certified Public Manager Program is a certified and accredited management and leadership program based on the belief that systematic training and management programs are essential to maintain and improve the effectiveness and professionalism of government managers and supervisors
  45. 45. Certified Public Manager Program is a certified and accredited management and leadership program that started in 1970s in Georgia based on the belief that systematic training and management programs are essential to maintain and improve the effectiveness and professionalism of government managers and supervisors. Today this innovative program is offered in many states and includes seminars, application projects, case studies, role playing, structured readings and examinations. The curriculum addresses various management principles and skills to improve manager’s understanding of complex organizations. It includes the management of individual and group performance, social change and its impact on public managers, problem solving and decision making, improving organizational effectiveness, managing change and leadership HRM IN ACTION
  46. 46. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Classroom Training Lecture is one of the most common methods in classroom training, teaching by the spoken words, or by other media such as transparencies, slides, video tapes, and computer slides.
  47. 47. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Classroom Training Lecture strengths: - can communicate the intrinsic interest of the subject matter. The lecturer can communicate his interest for the subject, which should enhance the audience’s interest in learning - can cover materials not otherwise available - can reach many learners at one time - pose minimal threat to the learners
  48. 48. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Classroom Training Lecture strengths: - lecturers can serve as effective models for the audience. An effective lecturer not only conveys information but also conveys what does and does not work in different settings. - lets the instructor control what will be covered, the sequence in which it will be covered and how much time will be devoted to each topic
  49. 49. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Classroom Training Lecture weaknesses: - it often does not allow feedback from the audience - listeners are often passive - the lengths of lecture periods often does not match the learners’ interest span - fails to allow individual differences in ability or experience
  50. 50. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Classroom Training Lecture weaknesses: - unsuitable for certain higher forms of learning such as analysis and diagnosis - partially dependent at the public speaking skills and abilities of the lecturer
  51. 51. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Case Studies popularized by Harvard School of Business, real or hypothetical situations are presented to the trainee to analyze. This would force the trainee to think through problems, propose solutions and choose among them and analyze the consequence of the decision. The success of the case study method depends heavily on the skills of the instructor. Asking probing questions and keeping everyone involved in the analysis of the case are critical to the success of this method. Classroom Training
  52. 52. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Case Studies advantages: - expose learners to a wide range of true-to-life management problems - cases inspire interest in otherwise theoretical and abstract training materials - emphasize the analysis of the situation that is typical of the manager’s world - improve the trainee’s verbal and communication skills Classroom Training
  53. 53. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Case Studies weaknesses: - cases often focus on past and static conditions - analysis often lacks emotional involvement on the part of the student and this is unrealistic in terms of what the trainee would actually do in the situation - can sometime confuse students who are used to definite solution. Classroom Training
  54. 54. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Case Studies Incident Method is a variation of the case study where the learner is initially given on the general outline of the situation. The instructor then provides additional information as the learner requests it. It makes students probe the situations and seek additional information, much as they would be required to do in real life. Classroom Training
  55. 55. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Role Playing is a method where participants are assigned different roles and required to act out those roles in a realistic situation. the idea is for the participants to learn from playing out the assigned roles. The success of this method depends on the ability of participants to assume the roles realistically. Videotaping allows for review and evaluation of the exercise to improve its effectiveness. Classroom Training
  56. 56. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job In-Basket Technique simulates a realistic situation by requiring each participant to answer one manager’s mail and telephone calls. Important duties are interspersed with routine matters. Participants analyze the situations and suggest alternative actions. They are evaluated on the basis of the number and quality of decisions and on the priorities assigned to each situation.
  57. 57. MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT AT EXXONMOBIL Exxonmobil’s British operation makes use of the in-basket technique in its management development program. This is a two-part exercise: One hour’s preparation, followed by an interview. During the preparation, participants read through a number of memos that reflect the issues which they could face on a daily basis. They are asked to prioritize the memos and consider how they would respond to the issues presented in the memos. The follow-up interview is with one interviewer who discusses the participant’s general approach to the tasks as well as some of the specific issued posed. One of the memos requires written response from the trainee on a subject relevant to their department. HRM IN ACTION
  58. 58. MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT AT EXXONMOBIL This written test is not discussed but is assessed separately. This exercise is designed to test the participants’ organizational abilities and written/verbal communication skills. It requires them to assimilate information quickly, be able to quickly assess unfamiliar or unexpected situations when events are moving at a fast pace, and make wise and sensible decisions in those situations. HRM IN ACTION
  59. 59. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Web-Based Training – online courses are most often given in conjunction with instructor-led courses, so that employees still have the advantage of seeing hands-on demonstrations when necessary. The flexibility of time, place and programs offered via WBT appeals to employees who often must balance schooling with work and home responsibilities.
  60. 60. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Business Simulations generally provide a setting of a company and its environment and require teams of players to make decisions involving their company operations in connection with other teams. The instructor can add complexity and economic events and human resource challenges. This method forces individual not only to work with other group members but also to function in an atmosphere of competition within the industry.
  61. 61. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Business Simulations advantages - simulate reality, decisions are made in a competitive environment - feedback is provided concerning decisions - decisions are made using less than complete data The only Business Simulations disadvantage is that many participants simply attempt to determine the key to winning. When this occurs, the simulation is not used to its fullest potential as a learning device.
  62. 62. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Adventure Learning also known as experiential – learning use many kinds of outdoor activities, often involving physical risk, to help participants achieve their objectives, which generally fall into two categories Group-focused objectives include better communication, more creative problem solving, more effective teamwork and improved leadership. One activitiy often included is “The Wall” that the teams must get over by working together. The wall is viewed as a symbol for any business challenge.
  63. 63. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job Adventure Learning Personal growth objectives include improved self- esteem, risk-taking skills, increased self-awareness and better stress management. Rope activities are favorite methods for achieving personal growth objectives. One example of a rope activities is the “electric rope” game. A team has to get every member over a rope strung high up between two tress. Team members must try not to touch the rope, and they cannot use props. The rope is view as an analogy for the difficult business challenge the team faces at work
  64. 64. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job University and Professional Association Seminars are courses intended to help meet the management development needs of various organizations ranging from courses in principles of supervision to advanced executive management programs. DepEd INSET are training courses usually conducted by the National Educator’s Academy of the Philippines to provide assistance/enhancement to managerial skills of school heads (SHDP) and teaching skills of teachers (K to 12)
  65. 65. Methods Used in Management Development Off the Job University and Professional Association Seminars DepEd INSET on curriculum implementation usually are held with partner agencies (CHED, DOST, DOH, DOJ, etc) and with other universities and colleges. Some DepEd Thrusts and Programs are also aided with foreign government educational agencies and professional organizations/association such as the PAHRODF, DepEd-BMG and others.
  66. 66. Evaluation of Management Development Activities Four Alternatives in evaluating MDA A I – Are the trainees happy with the course? A II – Does the training course teach the concepts? A III – Are the concepts used on the job? A IV – Does the application of the concepts positively affect the organization?
  67. 67. EVALUATION MATRIX What We Want to Know What Might be Measure I. Are the trainees happy with the course? If not, why not? a. concepts not relevant b. format of the presentation II. Do the materials teach the concepts? If not, why not? a. concepts too complex b. examples not relevant c. exercises not relevant d. format of presentation III. Are the concepts used? If not, why not? a. Concepts: - not relevant - too complex b. Environment not supportive I. Does application of concepts positively affect the organization? If not, why not? Trainees reaction during workshop Trainees reaction after workshop Trainees performance during workshop Trainee performance at end of workshop Performance improvements Performance improvements
  68. 68. TRAINEE REACTIONS The most frequently used evaluation method focuses on the question: Are the trainees happy with the course? However, these evaluations should not be taken at face value because psychological biases can skew the accuracy of the feedback. There are possible reasons for participants responding more positively that expected on these evaluations. 1. participants are primed to assume that the presenter wants them to answer positively 2. individuals tend to be rated more highly when they are on their own, than viewed as part of a group, the participants sympathize the trainer as an individual 3. as participants near the completion of the training, they are more likely to rate the training more favorably than they would have at some earlier point in the course. HRM IN ACTION
  69. 69. TRAINEE REACTIONS Although this method does not provide sufficient feedback, it can be a useful tool. • It can tell us how relevant participants thought the training was. • It can tell us whether or not they were confused by any of the training. • It can point out any areas in which trainees thought information was missing. • It can give us an idea of how engaged the trainees felt by the training. • It can tell us how favorable overall participant reactions were. HRM IN ACTION
  70. 70. Assessment Centers An assessment center is a formal method used in training and/or selection and aimed at evaluating an individual’s potential as a manager by exposing the individual to simulated problems that would be faced in real-life managerial situation. Assessment centers are used for making decisions on promoting, evaluating, and training managerial personnel.
  71. 71. Assessment Centers Exercises include in-basket, business simulations, group discussions, cases, interviews, and various paper-and- pencil tests. These exercises involve the assessees in situations that require decision making, leadership, written and oral communication, planning, and organizing. Assessees are generally examined in groups of approximately six persons whose personality characteristics to be assessed are similar and who occupy similar positions in the organization.
  72. 72. Assessment Centers Each assesse is ranked in a relative scale such as “more that acceptable”, “acceptable” or “not acceptable” The primary use of assessment centers has been a predictor of success in some position for which the assesse is being considered. However, the method can also be used to identify special training that the assessee may require.
  73. 73. Organizational Development Organizational development seeks to improve the performances of groups, departments and the overall organization. It is an organization-wide, planned effort managed from the top, with the goal of increasing organizational performance through planned interventions and training experiences. It looks at the human side of organizations. It seeks to change attitudes, values, organizational structures, and managerial practices in an effort to improve organizational performance.
  74. 74. Organizational Development The ultimate goal of OD it to structure the organizational environment so that managers and employees can use their developed skills and abilities to the fullest. The initial phase of an OD effort is a recognition by management that organizational performance can and should be improved. Following this initial recognition, most OD effort include the following phases: 1. diagnosis 2. strategy planning 3. education 4. evaluation
  75. 75. Organizational Development It involves gathering and analyzing information about the organization to determine the areas in need of improvement usually gathered from employees through the use of questionnaires or attitude surveys. Diagnosis is the first decision to make in the OD process is to diagnose whether the organization has the talent and available time necessary to conduct diagnosis. If not, an alternative is to hire an outside consultant. Once the decision has been made regarding who will do the diagnosis, the next step is to gather and analyze information.
  76. 76. Organizational Development Some of the most frequently used methods for doing diagnosis involve the following: Diagnosis Available records that may be pertinent will be reviewed such as personnel records and financial reports Survey questionnaires is a popular method which will be filled out by employees. This is intended to measure employee attitudes and perceptions about certain work- related factors.
  77. 77. Organizational Development Diagnosis Personal interviews are conducted to each of the employees regarding their opinions and perceptions about the organization. It takes time but can result in better information Direct observation will be done by the person conducting diagnosis to observe firsthand the behavior or organizational members at work. It will allow observation of what people actually do as opposed to what they say they do.
  78. 78. Organizational Development The data collected in the diagnostic stage must be carefully interpreted to determines the best plan for organizational improvement, Strategy Planning The key to interpreting the data is to look for trends and areas of general agreement. The end result is to identify specific problem areas and outline steps for resolving the problems
  79. 79. Organizational Development The purpose of the education phase is to share the information obtained in the diagnostic phase with the affected employees and help them realize the need for change. Education A thorough analysis in the change-planning phase often results in identifying the most appropriate intervention/education method to use.
  80. 80. Organizational Development Education/Intervention Methods Education With the Direct Feedback the change agent communicates the information gathered in the diagnostic and change-planning phases to the involved parties. He describes what was found and what changes are recommended. Then workshops are often conducted to initiate the desired changes.
  81. 81. Organizational Development Education/Intervention Methods Education The objective Team Building is to increase the groups cohesiveness and general group spirit. It stresses the importance of working together. Specific activities used include clarifying employees roles, reducing conflicts, improving interpersonal relations and improving problem-solving skills.
  82. 82. Organizational Development Education/Intervention Methods Education Sensitivity Training is designed to make one more aware of oneself and one’s impact on others. Sensitivity training involves a group of 10 to 15 people who may or may not know each other, meets with no agenda or particular focus, no planned structure or no prior common experiences, the behavior of individuals in trying to deal with the lack of structure becomes the agenda. Members are encouraged to learn about themselves and others in this non-structured environment
  83. 83. Organizational Development Education/Intervention Methods Education Sensitivity Training has been both passionately criticized and vigorously defended as to its relative value for organizations. Research shows that people who have undergone sensitivity training tend to show increased sensitivity, more open communication, and increased flexibility. Same studies indicate that while the outcomes are generally beneficial, it is difficult to predict the outcomes for any one person.
  84. 84. Organizational Development The most difficult phase in the OD process is the evaluation phase. The basic question to be answered is: Did the OD process produce desired results? Evaluation Before any OD effort can be evaluated, the first requirement is that explicit objectives must be determined, outcome-oriented and lend themselves to the development of measurable criteria. The second requirement is that the evaluation effort must be methodologically sound.
  85. 85. Organizational Development Evaluation Approaches Evaluation One approach is to compare data collected before the OD intervention against data collected after the OD intervention. An even better approach is to compare “before” and “after” data with similar data from a control group. When using this approach, two similar groups are identified, an experimental group and a control group. The OD effort is then implemented with the experimental group but not with the control group. After the intervention has been completed, the data of both groups are compared.
  86. 86. Organizational Development Evaluation Approaches Evaluation From a practical standpoint, it may be desirable to use different personnel to evaluate an OD effort than those who implemented the effort. The people who implemented the effort may not be capable of objectively evaluating it.
  87. 87. Knowledge Application The 40-Year Employee Consolidating Three Organizations
  88. 88. WHY IS CAREER DEVELOPMENT NECESSARY? Career Development is an ongoing, formalized effort by an organization that focuses on developing and enriching the organization’s human resources in light of both the employees’ and the organization’s needs can reduce costs due to employee turnover companies assist employees in developing career plans and and these plans are closely tied to the organization, hence, employees are less likely to move to another organization
  89. 89. WHY IS CAREER DEVELOPMENT NECESSARY? the fact that an organization shows interest in employees’ career development has a positive effect in the part of the employees, improve morale and boost production and help the organization become more efficient ,employees believe the company regards them as part of the overall plan of the organization, not just figures and numbers an emphasis on career development can also have a positive effect on the ways employees view their job and their employers career planning is a process by which an individual formulates career goals and develops a plan for reaching these goals
  90. 90. WHY IS CAREER DEVELOPMENT NECESSARY? career planning objectives to meet the immediate and future human resource needs of the organization on a timely basis to better inform the individual and the organization about potential career paths within the organization to utilize human resource programs to the fullest by integrating the activities that select, assign, develop and manage individual careers with the organization’s plans
  91. 91. WHY IS CAREER DEVELOPMENT NECESSARY? career planning realistic career planning forces individual to look at available opportunities in relation to their abilities with a career plan, a person is much more likely to experience satisfaction while making progress along the career path a good career path identifies certain milestones along the way, when the person consciously recognizes and reaches this milestone, he is much more likely to experience feeling of achievement
  92. 92. The Millennial Generation. The Millennial Generation, also known as Generation Y, are those born between 1978 and 1999. The generation grew up with computers and is the most technologically savvy in the history. Millennials are expected to make up 75% of the US labor force by 2025. Millinnials have strong opinions about work and the things they are looking for are somewhat different from those of the Baby Boomer generation. They are looking for more flexibility in areas such as work locations, schedules, and work assignments. They want expanded transparency, they want to understand the rationale behind every decision. They are looking for flatter organizations and less hierarchy. They tend to be more team oriented and want to know that work is not “just a bunch of random different experiences. HRM IN ACTION
  93. 93. Because Millennials are expected to outnumber Baby Boomers in the workplace, it behooves today’s organizations to adapt policies, practices, and even careers to leverage this generation’s strengths and minimize its weaknesses. HRM IN ACTION
  94. 94. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Organization’s Responsibilities the organization is the entity that has primary responsibility for instigating and ensuring that career development takes place to develop and communicate options within the organization to carefully advise employees concerning possible career paths to achieve their career goals HR are responsible for ensuring that this information is kept current as new jobs are created and old ones are phased out
  95. 95. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Organization’s Responsibilities working closely with both employees and their managers, HR should see that accurate information is conveyed and that interrelationships among different career paths are understood the organization should promote the conditions and create an environment that will facilitate the development of individual career plans by employees
  96. 96. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Employee’s Responsibilities the primary responsibility for preparing individual career plans rests with the individual employee. career planning is not something one person can do for another, it has to come from the individual only the individual knows what he wants out of a career, and certainly these desires vary appreciably from person to person
  97. 97. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Employee’s Responsibilities the primary responsibility for preparing individual career plans rests with the individual employee. career planning is not something one person can do for another, it has to come from the individual only the individual knows what he wants out of a career, and certainly these desires vary appreciably from person to person while the individual is ultimately responsible for preparing his career plan, people who do not receive encouragement and direction make little progress
  98. 98. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities “the critical battleground in career development is inside the mind of the person charged with supervisory responsibility” the manager can and should play a key role in facilitating the development of a subordinate’s career many managers do not perceive career counseling as part of their managerial duties, they are not necessarily opposed to this role, rather they have never considered it a part of their job many organizations have designed training programs to help their managers develop the necessary skills in this area
  99. 99. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 1. Communicator - holds formal and informal discussion with employees - listens to and understands an employee’s real concerns - clearly and effectively interacts with an employee - establishes an environment for open interaction - structures uninterrupted time to meet with employees Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  100. 100. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 2. Counselor - helps employee identify career-related skills, interests and values - helps employee identify a variety of career options - helps employees evaluate appropriateness of various options - helps employee design/plan strategy to achieve an agreed-on career goal Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  101. 101. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 3. Appraiser - identifies critical job elements - negotiates with employee a set of goals and objectives to evaluate performance - assesses employee performance related to goals and objectives - communicates performance evaluation and assessment to employee Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  102. 102. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 3. Appraiser - designs a development plan around future job goals and objectives - reinforces effective job performance - reviews an established development plan on an ongoing basis Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  103. 103. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 4. Coach - teaches specific job-related or technical skills - reinforces effective performance - suggests specific behaviors for improvement - clarifies and communicates goals and objectives of work group and organization Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  104. 104. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 5. Mentor - arranges for employees to participate in a high- visibility activity either inside or outside the organization - serves as a role model in employee’s career development by demonstrating successful career behaviors Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  105. 105. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 5. Mentor - supports employee by communicating employee’s effectiveness to others in and out of organization - share knowledge about how to learn and work with others Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  106. 106. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 6. Advisor - communicates realities of progression in the organization - suggests appropriate training activities that could benefit employee - suggests appropriate strategies for career advancement Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  107. 107. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 7. Broker - assists in bringing employees together who might mutually help each other in their career - assists in linking employees with appropriate educational or employment opportunities - helps identify obstacles to changing present situation - helps identify sources enabling a career development change Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  108. 108. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 8. Referral agent - identifies employees with problems (career, personal. health, financial) - identifies resources appropriate to an employee experiencing a problem - bridges and supports employee with referral agents - follow up on effectiveness of suggested referrals Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  109. 109. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR CAREER DEVELOPMEN Manager’s Responsibilities 9. Advocate - works with employee in designing a plan for redress of a specific issue at higher levels of management - works with employee in planning alternative strategies if a redress by management is not successful - represents employee’s concern to higher-level management for redress specific issues Potential Career Development Roles of Managers
  110. 110. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT successful implementation of a career development program involves four basic steps at the individual level individual’s assessment of his abilities, interests, and career goals organization’s assessment of the individual’s abilities and potentials communication of career options and opportunities within the organization career counseling to set realistic goals and plans for their accomplishment
  111. 111. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Individual Assessment individual’s assessment of his abilities, interests, and career goals while this is not something an organization can do for the individual, the organization can provide the impetus and structure It should not be limited by current resources and abilities, career plans normally require that the individual acquire additional training and skills
  112. 112. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Individual Assessment assessment should be based on reality this involves identifying personal strengths, not only the individual’s developed abilities, but also the financial resources available once an individual has a grasp of his interests and abilities, it is very helpful to develop a personal vision statement which can help stay on track and avoid events that don’t positively relate to this career
  113. 113. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Individual Assessment effective vision statement are concise (not more than two sentences) and they are stated in measurable terms I want to develop my career by gaining knowledge, skills, abilities and credentials needed to become a quality schools division superintendent in Dapitan City earning an annual salary of 1 289 328 by the year 2020 once drafted, it is a good idea to share it with key stakeholders; it may be revised as one progresses throughout his career
  114. 114. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Assessment by the Organization the most frequently used source for assessment performance has been the performance appraisal process assessment centers can also be a excellent source of information other sources include personnel records reflecting information such as education and previous work experience it is a good idea for an organization not to depend on any one source of information but to use as many as are readily available
  115. 115. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Communicating Career Options to set realistic career goals, an individual must know the options and opportunities that are available to which the organization can do several things to facilitate such awareness posting in the intranet/boards and advertising job vacancies are among the several activities that help employees get a feel for their options identify possible paths of advancement within the organization is helpful, done through performance appraisal process and in sharing human resource planning forecasts
  116. 116. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Pathing a technique that addresses the specifics of progressing from one job to another in the organization it is a sequence of developmental activities involving formal and informal education, training and job experiences that help make an individual capable of holding advanced jobs it exists on an informal basis in almost all organizations, however career paths are much more useful when formally defined and documented as a result in specific descriptions of sequential work experiences, and how these relate to one another
  117. 117. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Self-Management the ability to keep pace with the speed at which change occurs within the organization and the industry and to prepare for the future the basic concept is for the employees to take the responsibility for managing their own development the organization defines the necessary core competencies and each employee assesses whether he has it, or if not, how these competencies can be developed
  118. 118. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Self-Management it emphasizes the need of individual employees to keep learning because jobs that are held today may evolve into something different tomorrow or may simply disappear entirely it involves identifying and obtaining new skills and competencies that allow the employee to move to a new position the payoff is more highly skilled and flexible employees and the retention of these employees
  119. 119. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Self-Management it requires commitment to the idea of employee self- development on the part of management and provision of self-development programs and experience for employees the trend today in many organizations is to emphasize career self-management
  120. 120. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Counseling it is an activity that integrates the different steps in the career-development process. it may be performed by an employee’s immediate manager, a human resource specialist, or a combination of the two in most cases, it is preferable to have the immediate manager conduct counseling with appropriate input from human resource personnel since the immediate manager generally has the advantage of practical experience, knows tha company and is in a position to make a realistic appraisal of organizational opportunities
  121. 121. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Counseling managers who are skilled in basic human relations are successful as career counselors developing a caring attitude toward employees and their career is of prime importance being receptive to employee’s concerns and problems is another requirement to becoming career counselors
  122. 122. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Counseling suggestions for helping managers become better career counselors 1. Recognize the limits of career counseling. Remember that the manager and the organization serve as catalysts in the career development process. The primary responsibility for developing a career plan lies with the individual employee 2. Respect confidentiality. Career counseling is very personal and has basic requirements of ethics, confidentiality and privacy
  123. 123. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Counseling suggestions for helping managers become better career counselors 3. Establish a relationship. Be honest, open and sincere with the subordinate. Try to be empathetic and see things from the subordinate’s point of view 4. Listen effectively. Learn to be a sincere listener. A natural human tendency is to want to do most of the talking. It often takes a conscious effort to be a good listener
  124. 124. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Counseling suggestions for helping managers become better career counselors 5. Consider alternatives. Help subordinates realize that a number of choices are usually available, help them expand their thinking and avoid being limited by past experience. 6. Seek and share information. Be sure the employee and the organization have completed their respective assessments of the employees abilities, interests and desires and that the result is clearly communicated to the employee and that he is made aware of potential job openings within the organization.
  125. 125. IMPLEMENTING CAREER DEVELOPMENT Career Counseling suggestions for helping managers become better career counselors 7. Assist with goal definition and planning. Remember that the employee must make the final decisions. Managers should serve as “sounding boards” and help ensure that the individual’s plans are valid
  126. 126. REVIEWING CAREER PROGRESS Individual careers rarely go exactly according to plan. The environment changes, personal desires change and other things happen. However, if the individual periodically reviews both the career plan and the situation, he can make adjustments so that career development is not impaired. A career plan that is not kept current rapidly becomes useless. Complacency is the greatest danger once a career plan has been developed. The plan must be updated as the circumstances and the individual change
  127. 127. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Employees and managers hold many myths related to career development and advancement, which are misleading and can inhibit career development Myth 1: There is always room for one more person at the top. This myth contradicts the fact that the structures of the overwhelming majority of today’s organizations have fewer positions available as one progresses up the organization. Adherence to this myth fosters unrealistic aspirations and generates self-perpetuating frustrations Myths held by Employees
  128. 128. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 2: The key to success is being in the right place at the right time. One can always find a highly successful person who attributes all of his or her success to being in the right place at the right time. People who adhere to this myth are rejecting the basic philosophy of planning: that a person, through careful design, can affect rather than merely accept the future. Adherence to this myth is dangerous because it can lead to complacency and a defeatist attitude. Myths held by Employees
  129. 129. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 3: Good subordinates make good superiors. This myth is based on the belief that those who perform best in their current jobs should be the ones who are promoted. This is not to imply that good performance should not be rewarded, for it should. However, promotions are made based on the requirements of the new job in addition the individual’s present job performance. Many a times good employees failed when promoted to managerial positions. Not because someone excels at one job does not mean he will excel in all jobs, or even the next-level job Myths held by Employees
  130. 130. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 4: Career development and planning are functions of human resource personnel. The ultimate responsibility for career development and planning belongs to the individual, not to human resource personnel or the individual’s manger. HR can assist the individual and answer questions, but they cannot develop a career plan for him. Only the individual can make career-related decisions. Myths held by Employees
  131. 131. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 5: All good things come to those who work long, hard hours. People guided by this myth often spend 10 to 12 hours a day trying to impress their managers. However, extra hours on the job often have little or no relationship to what the manager considers important, to the person’s effectiveness on the job or to the individual’s long-range career growth. Myths held by Employees
  132. 132. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 6: Rapid advancement along a career path is largely a function of the kind of manager one has. A manager can affect a subordinate’s rate of advancement, however, those who adhere to this myth often accept a defensive role and ignore the importance of their own actions. Belief in this myth provides a ready-made excuse for failure. It is easy and convenient to blame failures on one’s manager. Myths held by Employees
  133. 133. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 7: The way to get ahead is to determine your weakness and then work hard to correct them. Successful salespeople do not emphasize the weak points of their products, rather, they emphasize the strong points. The same should be true in career development and planning. Individuals who achieve their career objectives do so by stressing those things they do uncommonly well. The secret is to first capitalize on one’s strengths and then try to improve deficiencies in other areas. Myths held by Employees
  134. 134. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 8: Always do your best, regardless of the task. This myth stems from the Puritan work ethic. The problem is that believers ignore the fact the different tasks have different priorities. Because there is only a limited amount of time, a person should spend that time according to priorities. The ideas is to give something less than one’s best effort to unimportant tasks in order to have time to give one’s best effort to the important ones. Myths held by Employees
  135. 135. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 9: It is wise to keep home life and work life separated. An individual cannot make wise career decisions without the full knowledge and support of his spouse, he should share his inner feelings concerning their jobs so that his spouse will understand the basic factors that weigh in any career decisions. A healthy person usually has interests other than a job. Career strategy should be designed to recognize and support, not contradict, these other interests. Career objectives should be a subset of one’s life objectives. Myths held by Employees
  136. 136. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 10: The grass in always greener on the other side of the fence. Regardless of the career path an individual follows, another one always seems a little more attractive. However, utopia does not exist. More than likely, a job involves many of the same problems every working person might face. This is not to say that job and related changes should not be made; however, one should avoid making such changes hastily. Myths held by Employees
  137. 137. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 1: Career development will raise expectations. Many managers fear that an emphasis on career development will raise employee expectations to unrealistically high levels. Career development should do the opposite, it should bring employee’s aspirations into the open and match their skills, interests and goals with oppurtunities that are realistically available Myths held by Managers
  138. 138. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 2: We will be overwhelmed by requests. This myth is based on the fear that an emphasis on career development will raise employee will deluge their managers for information about jobs in other parts of the organization and that employees will expect the organization to provide them with a multitude of career development. While this fear is very realistic in the minds of the managers, it is basically unfounded Myths held by Managers
  139. 139. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 2: We will be overwhelmed by requests. This myth is based on the fear that an emphasis on career development will raise employee will deluge their managers for information about jobs in other parts of the organization and that employees will expect the organization to provide them with a multitude of career development. While this fear is very realistic in the minds of the managers, it is basically unfounded. Myths held by Managers
  140. 140. CAREER-RELATED MYTHS Myth 3: Managers will not be able to cope. Management often becomes concerned that introducing career development and planning will place managers in a counseling role for which they are ill prepared. Myths held by Managers Myth 4: We do not have the necessary systems in place. This myth is based on the belief that before the organization can introduce career development, it must first put in place a whole series of human resource planning mechanisms such as job posting, succession planning, and certain training experiences
  141. 141. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS It is the point in a career where the likelihood of an additional promotion is very low. It takes place when an employee reaches a position from which he is not likely to be promoted further. All employees reach a plateau in their career, others reached this level earlier than others Plateaued employees are those who “reach the promotional ceiling” long before they retire
  142. 142. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS It is the point in a career where the likelihood of an additional promotion is very low. It takes place when an employee reaches a position from which he is not likely to be promoted further. All employees reach a plateau in their career, others reached this level earlier than others Plateaued employees are those who “reach the promotional ceiling” long before they retire
  143. 143. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS Because it is inherently true that fewer positions are available as on moves up the hierarchical ladder, plateauing does not necessarily indicate failure. However the case of a plateauee may need to be handled differently in some situations than that of an employee still on the rise in the organization
  144. 144. T2 T1 T3 MT1 MT2 MT3 MT4 HT SP PSDS, ES1 ES2 CHIEF ASDS SDS CHIEF ARD RD
  145. 145. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS Four Principal Career Categories LEARNERS – individuals with high potential for advancement who are performing below standard STARS – individuals presently doing outstanding work and having a full potential for continued advancement; these people are on the fast-track career paths SOLID CITIZENS – individuals whose performance is satisfactory but whose chance for future advancement is small. DEADWOOD– individuals whose present performance has fallen to an unsatisfactory level
  146. 146. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS Four Principal Career Categories Naturally, organizations would like to have all stars and solid citizens The challenge however, is to transform the learners into stars and solid citizens and keep the current stars and solid citizens from slipping into the deadwood category There is a tendency to overlook solid citizens. The learners, stars and deadwood usually get the most of attention in terms of development programs and stimulating assignments
  147. 147. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS Actions that can aid in managing career plateauing process Prevent plateauees from becoming ineffective (prevent a problem from occuring) Integrate relevant career related information systems (improve monitoring so that emerging problems can be detected and treated early Manage ineffective plateaus and frustrated employees more effectively (cure the problem once it has arise)
  148. 148. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS Rehabilitating Ineffective Plateaus Certainly deadwoods are can have negative impact but there are also several good reasons to salvage these employees Job Knowledge – plateaued employees have usually been in the job for quite some time and has amassed considerable job knowledge Organizational knowledge – plateaued employees not only know their jobs but also know the organization Loyalty – plateaued employees are not job hoppers and demonstrated above-average loyalty in the organization
  149. 149. DEALING WITH CAREER PLATEAUS Rehabilitating Ineffective Plateaus Possibilities that exist in rehabilitating plateaus Provide alternative ways of recognition  assignment to chair technical committees, training new employees Develop new ways to make their current jobs more satisfying by relating employees’ performance to the organization’s goal achievements Effect revitalization through reassignment. The ideas here is to implement systematic job switching to positions at the same level that require many similar, though not exactly the same skills, and experiences
  150. 150. CAREER LATTICES The idea of a career lattice is to think of employees moving at any angle, heading from side to side, supporting organizational goals while getting their career goals met at the same time. The lattice approach supports employees to move to different projects and locations across the organization rather than only through higher ladder-like levels. Mass Career Customization (MCC) goal is to align current and future career development options.
  151. 151. CAREER LATTICES MCC Framework outlines a definite set of options along each of four core career dimensions: PACE – addresses how fast the employee wants to grow and accelerate on his career WORKLOAD – addresses whether the employee wants to work of part time LOCATION/SCHEDULE – focuses when and where the employee works ROLE – focuses what kind of work responsibilities the employee has or wants
  152. 152. CAREER LATTICES LATTICE THINKING LADDER THINKING Movement in the organization is at any angle: side to side, up or down Movement is restricted to up or down What and how employees contribute is most important Promotions and titles are most important Fluid, long term strategy, grow in your current position Static, long term strategy Look organization-wide for expertise Look upward in the organization for expertise Rewards are based on learning and performance Rewards are related to titles
  153. 153. THE IMPACT OF DUAL-EMPLOYED COUPLES AND SINGLE-PARENT EMPLOYEES Dual-employed couples are usually classified into two categories DUAL-CAREER COUPLES both members are highly committed to their careers and view work as essential to their psychological sense of self and as integral to their personal identities. They view their employment as part of a career path involving progressively more responsibility, power and financial renumeration
  154. 154. THE IMPACT OF DUAL-EMPLOYED COUPLES AND SINGLE-PARENT EMPLOYEES Dual-employed couples are usually classified into two categories DUAL-EARNER COUPLES one or both of the members defines employment as relating to rewards such as money for paying bills, an opportunity to keep busy, or an additional resource to help out. They do not see their employment as an integral part of their self-definition
  155. 155. LIFE PREPAREDNESS A healthy state of vigilance regarding threats to one’s career well-being as well as alertness to resources and opportunities to which one capitalizes. Use proactive strategies to manage barriers, build supports and otherwise advocate for one’s own career life future. Under this principle, one considers the things that can go right and the things that can go wrong Its goal is an expanded awareness that obstacles often impede career paths, a healthy sense of career vigilance towards career threatening events, a set of strategies for responding to and recovering from setbacks and a proactive stance towards managing one’s own work life and promoting one’s own work
  156. 156. LIFE PREPAREDNESS Goals - expanded awareness that obstacles often impede career paths - a healthy sense of career vigilance towards career threatening events - a set of strategies for responding to and recovering from setbacks and - a proactive stance towards managing one’s own work life and promoting one’s own work well-being
  157. 157. “Behind every successful person, there is one elementary truth. Somewhere, someway, someone cared about their growth and development.” - Donald Miller, UK Mentoring Programme

×