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Econsultancy-Guide-to-LinkedIn-Marketing-Solutions

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Econsultancy-Guide-to-LinkedIn-Marketing-Solutions

  1. 1. Market Data / Supplier Selection / Event Presentations / User Experience Benchmarking / Best Practice / Template Files / Trends & Innovation  Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions
  2. 2. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Econsultancy London 4th Floor, Wells Point 79 Wells Street London W1T 3QN United Kingdom Telephone: +44 207 269 1450 http://econsultancy.com help@econsultancy.com Econsultancy New York 350 7th Avenue, Suite 307 New York, NY 10001 United States Telephone: +1 212 971 0630 Econsultancy Singapore 20 Collyer Quay #23-01 Singapore 049319 Telephone: +65 6653 1911 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Published March 2016
  3. 3. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 3 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Contents 1. Introduction............................................................... 6 2. What is LinkedIn? ..................................................... 8 3. Why is LinkedIn a Boon in your Marketing Toolkit? .....................................................................10 3.1. LinkedIn from the bottom up: LinkedIn profiles, the basic building block ..................................................................... 11 3.1.1. LinkedIn profile types explained ...................................12 3.1.2. Some features and functionality explained ...................16 3.2. The Anatomy of your personal LinkedIn account .............19 3.2.1. Your LinkedIn homepage...............................................19 3.2.2. Your LinkedIn profile page ........................................... 20 3.2.3. The value of completing your personal LinkedIn profile .............................................................................24 3.2.4. Personal profile best practice.........................................25 3.2.5. Functionality: see who has viewed your LinkedIn profile .............................................................................25 3.3. Using the ‘advanced search’ function.................................27 3.3.1. Using the ‘advanced search’ function – tips..................27 3.4. Managing your connections tab ........................................ 28 4. Company Pages........................................................ 30 4.1. Anatomy of a LinkedIn company page ..............................31 4.2. Company pages tips and best practice .............................. 32 4.3. Company page management and best practice ................ 33 5. LinkedIn Groups...................................................... 35 5.1. How to set up your own LinkedIn group .......................... 36 5.2. Best practice tips for running a group .............................. 36 6. About Pulse: The LinkedIn Publisher Platform...... 37 6.1. Pulse integration within the Newsfeed ............................. 39 6.2. LinkedIn Pulse best practice ............................................. 40 6.3. About LinkedIn Elevate – harnessing the power of employees............................................................................41 6.4. LinkedIn Elevate’s functionality ....................................... 42 6.5. Considerations for making Elevate available to staff ....... 42
  4. 4. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 4 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 7. An Overview of LinkedIn Advertising Opportunities........................................................... 43 7.1. Types of LinkedIn advertising: enterprise solutions........ 43 7.2. Sponsored updates ............................................................ 46 7.2.1. Company updates, direct sponsored content and sponsored updates ........................................................ 46 7.2.2. The difference between direct sponsored content and sponsored updates .........................................................47 7.3. LinkedIn Ads...................................................................... 48 7.4. Who can be targeted with LinkedIn advertisements and sponsored content?............................................................ 48 7.4.1. Anatomy of a LinkedIn text advertisement .................. 50 7.5. Lead Accelerator (no longer active) ...................................51 7.6. Getting started with LinkedIn advertising........................ 52 7.7. Some LinkedIn Advertising Guidance ...............................53 7.7.1. The good: targeting ........................................................53 7.7.2. The good: audience sizing..............................................53 7.7.3. The good: self-service tool .............................................53 7.8. The not-so-good................................................................. 54 7.8.1. The not-so-good: the ads ...............................................54 7.8.2. The not-so-good: managing a large number of campaigns.......................................................................55 7.8.3. The not-so-good: cost.....................................................55 7.9. Measuring LinkedIn advertising performance................. 56 7.9.1. A note on using Google Analytics URL builder to track campaigns.......................................................................57 7.9.2. A note on LinkedIn average click-through rates ...........61 7.9.3. LinkedIn Ads API...........................................................61 7.9.4. Case study: sponsored updates......................................61 8. LinkedIn as a Content Marketing Platform ............ 63 8.1. Best practice guidelines re content formats...................... 64 8.2. Maximising content visibility............................................ 65 9. Case Study: Leveraging the Networked Power of Employees for Content Marketing .......................... 67 9.1. Summary.............................................................................67 9.2. Objectives and aims............................................................67 9.3. Implementation, execution and tactics..............................67 9.4. Results................................................................................ 68
  5. 5. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 5 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 10. LinkedIn’s Mobile Apps .......................................... 69 11. Appendix.................................................................. 70 11.1. About the author................................................................ 70 11.2. Glossary of terms ............................................................... 70 11.3. A note on SlideShare...........................................................72 11.4. SlideShare advertising........................................................75 11.5. SlideShare best practice......................................................75 11.6. Content marketing resources ............................................ 78
  6. 6. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 6 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 1. Introduction LinkedIn is the unattractive and often ignored sleeping giant of the social networks. At the time of writing, over half of the world’s 770 million professionals have LinkedIn access and, in the wake of its consistent subscriber growth, it presents a formidable platform that enables B2B marketers to develop commercial relationships with potential new customers in a trusted, highly-respected environment. From launch over a decade ago in 2003, the organisation has grown exponentially from its humble roots as a niche social networking site for professionals, to become a veritable content powerhouse that has corporation executives enthusing over the marketing possibilities inherent in its demographic data and targeted advertising.1 The purpose of this guide is to help mentor B2B marketers to extract maximum value from LinkedIn’s comprehensive range of products and features. Econsultancy has specifically designed this guide to be easily understood, supported by visual examples and case studies so that recommendations can be readily taken on board by time-poor B2B marketers on the ground. This document has been designed as a guide to using LinkedIn for marketing purposes, both from a strategic and functional point of view. The document begins by explaining the fundamentals of building a compelling LinkedIn profile. This includes a brief discussion of the pros and cons of the various subscriber accounts. It concludes with a list of recommendations about how to utilise the various profile features and how these can be used collectively to generate ‘trust signals’ to position you as a top-ranking business professional. As a publishing platform, LinkedIn offers scale and dedicated networks, segmented by industry, hosting expert blog posts, forums (in the form of LinkedIn Groups) and even a dedicated news stream that can drive millions of page views (much like the early days of Digg and Reddit). On the other hand, LinkedIn increasingly facilitates how users stay informed through sharing news, knowledge and relevant content. This document will examine how LinkedIn provides a formidable commercial opportunity for content marketing via the following solutions:  Company pages  Sponsored updates  SlideShare  Groups  Pulse Finally, LinkedIn’s advertising opportunities will be examined, including:  Onsite display advertising  Network display advertising  Sponsored updates  Sponsored InMails 1 https://econsultancy.com/blog/62337-three-content-marketing-tips-from-linkedin-on-reaching-its- audience
  7. 7. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 The functionality, use cases and elements for successful execution will be examined for each solution in turn. Further opportunities for B2B marketers will be discussed, including setting up your own group, best practice guidelines around managing your profile and making use of LinkedIn for professional networking. Each LinkedIn product is underpinned by robust tracking and measurement tools. The report will conclude with a brief overview of LinkedIn Elevate, a tool for harnessing the power of employees to support them in acting as influencers on behalf of the organisation.
  8. 8. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 8 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 2. What is LinkedIn? LinkedIn is the premier global social network for professionals, with more than 400 million registered members from over 200 countries at the time of writing this report2. That represents over half of the 770 million professionals on the planet, making it the largest single online group of influential, affluent and educated individuals. The United States accounts for the mainstay of subscribers, with 118 million registered members, followed by India with 31 million and the UK with 19 million members3. However, in Q1 2015, more than 75% of new members came to LinkedIn from outside the US, with China being the key engine of new subscriber growth in 2014/15. The site is available in over 24 languages. The LinkedIn mission4 is to connect the world’s professionals in order to make them more productive and successful: “Our mission is to connect the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful. We believe that prioritising the needs of our members is the most effective and, ultimately, the most profitable means to accomplish our mission and create long- term value for all stakeholders. “We design our solutions to empower professionals to achieve greater professional success, while simultaneously enabling customers to identify and connect with the world’s best and most relevant talent.” Before examining how LinkedIn can be utilised as a powerful B2B marketing tool, it is useful to draw a thumbnail sketch of its business model in order to set the scene. LinkedIn generates revenues from the following divisions and services:  Talent solutions. Recruiters and corporations pay for the following5: – Corporate solutions – recruiter, job slots, recruitment media, career pages, talent pipeline – Job postings – Recruiter Lite – Job Seeker – Pay-per-click job advertisements that can be targeted to other LinkedIn users who match the job criteria. – Access to the database of LinkedIn users and CVs  Marketing solutions – Enterprise solutions – display ads, sponsored InMail, Lead Accelerator (delivers sales leads via relevant ad and content engagement) – Sponsored updates – LinkedIn ads – Ads API – Content marketing and distribution – LinkedIn Pulse, SlideShare, company pages, groups, Elevate 2 http://www.statista.com/statistics/274050/quarterly-numbers-of-linkedin-members/ 3 https://press.linkedin.com/about-linkedin 4 LinkedIn Annual report 2014. Available from: https://investors.linkedin.com/results-and- financials/annual-reports/default.aspx 5 Note: This report has been designed to specifically cover LinkedIn as a sales and marketing tool. A brief overview of LinkedIn’s Recruiter solution is included in the glossary at the back of this document.
  9. 9. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 9 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016  Sales solutions: Sales Navigator  Premium subscriptions. LinkedIn users pay for premium subscriptions, which are available at different levels depending on the functionality required: ‘Business Plus’, ‘Executive’, ‘Professional’. Some elements of the various subscription services, like InMail, are also on a pay-per-use basis. LinkedIn is all about business “LinkedIn, unlike Facebook and Twitter, is all about business. The mindset and intent are naturally more receptive to solving business problems than the kind of socialising and sharing that happens elsewhere.” Brian Clarke, founder of Copyblogger6 The B2B marketing process of reaching, nurturing and converting prospects has only become more problematic as consumers move across different devices, in turn complicating the funnel and conversion path. LinkedIn addresses this conundrum by offering an end-to-end suite of advertising products reaching potential clients at the top of the funnel down to the final conversion. The image below shows how LinkedIn marketing solutions can impact every stage of the typical sales funnel. Figure 1: LinkedIn marketing data: How LinkedIn’s own marketing products impact the sales funnel Source: LinkedIn Advertising and Marketing Solutions, https://business.linkedin.com/en-uk/marketing- solutions More than three million businesses maintain an active presence through LinkedIn Company Pages, providing a key point of access to a network of over 400 million registered users. Many professionals, while rushing to register on the platform and perhaps ‘dabbling’ in it, are not realising its full potential, thus squandering the opportunity to expand their business network. 6 https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/business/marketing- solutions/global/en_US/campaigns/pdfs/Linkedin_SophGuide_011614.pdf
  10. 10. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 10 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 3. Why is LinkedIn a Boon in your Marketing Toolkit? LinkedIn is often perceived as a social platform primarily benefitting recruiters and candidates. This perception probably stems from its Talent Solutions product, which contributed a total of 62% of Q2 2015 earnings. However, 18% of LinkedIn revenues came from Premium Subscriptions, the remaining 20% coming from Marketing Solutions, making up advertising and sponsored updates. Figure 2: LinkedIn sources of revenues, Q4 2015 Source: https://press.linkedin.com/about-linkedin We should also evaluate LinkedIn’s importance in the context of its consistent worldwide growth since its launch in 2003. The UK’s usage growth for example over the last ten years has been consistent and is often understated. In 2010 there were just two million UK registered users but, by March 2012, this had risen to ten million. This registrations figure is predicted to reach 18 million by the end of 2015.
  11. 11. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 3: Global registered members, Q1 2016 Source: https://press.linkedin.com/about-linkedin 3.1. LinkedIn from the bottom up: LinkedIn profiles, the basic building block The fundamental building block of LinkedIn is the personal profile which reads somewhat like a curriculum vitae or resume where registered members present their professional image by populating the profile with information such as their education, career history and skills. Individuals can include other data such as key achievements, awards, publications and presentations. From a marketing point of view, and indeed from LinkedIn’s point of view, the USP of its sales, marketing and recruitment value proposition is that the more information that individuals publish about themselves, the better the product. LinkedIn’s advertising product can be used to target people based on key criteria as follows: 1. Location 2. Company name 3. Company category 4. Company size 5. Industry 6. Job title or job category (function or level of seniority)
  12. 12. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 12 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 For example, Figure 4 shows how LinkedIn advertising can be used to target marketing directors based in Singapore. Figure 4: LinkedIn advertising audience targeting interface LinkedIn’s targeting capability can be used for a number of its products, including recruitment, targeted advertising and email marketing via its InMail product. 3.1.1. LinkedIn profile types explained LinkedIn offers several levels of Personal Profile. These range from free to professional profiles which incur monthly or annual fees but offer a number of benefits such as the ability to send targeted messages (InMails) to other users and the setting up of alerts for saved searches. The business case for the different types of premium account may depend upon the profile owner’s business objective or profession. LinkedIn offers different kinds of premium accounts depending on the type of relationship that a member might want to develop. Thus, there are premium account types aimed specifically at job seekers, sales professionals and recruitment professionals. There is also an option for the general professional who wants to get more out of LinkedIn. The premium account types are detailed in Table 1. The basic (free) LinkedIn profile The basic (free) LinkedIn profile is fairly comprehensive and provides account holders with access to the following functionality: 1. Building a professional profile. 2. Building a network of connections with no limit to the size of an individual’s personal network. On LinkedIn, the basic type of connection is a contact that a user knows personally and who they trust on a professional level. Once an individual has ‘connected’ to somebody on LinkedIn, the new connection is considered a first-degree connection. Users also have an extended network of connections made up of people that their connections know. Connections can be:
  13. 13. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 13 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 a. First degree – direct connection. You will see a ‘1st’ icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can then contact them by sending a message on LinkedIn. b. Second degree – people who are connected to your first-degree connections. You’ll see a ‘2nd’ icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can send them an invitation by clicking on ‘connect’ or contact them through an InMail. c. Third degree – people who are connected to your second-degree connections. You’ll see a ‘3rd’ icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. If their full first and last names are displayed, invitations can be sent to them by clicking on ‘connect’. If only the first letter of their last name is displayed, clicking on ‘connect’ isn’t an option but they can be contacted through an InMail. d. Fellow LinkedIn groups members – these individuals are considered part of your network because you’re members of the same group. You’ll see a ‘group’ icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can contact them by sending a message on LinkedIn or through the group. e. Out of network – LinkedIn members who fall outside of the categories listed above. You can only contact them through an InMail or if they have a premium account and have an open profile7. 3. Ability to send unlimited private messages to first-degree connections. 4. Users may provide and receive an unlimited number of endorsements and recommendations. 5. Users can join and also create up to 50 separate groups. 6. Performing an unlimited number of searches for LinkedIn members in your extended network. An overview of paid LinkedIn profiles LinkedIn offers a few levels of paid accounts, each with a specific level of benefits. LinkedIn has Premium account options for job seekers, sales and talent professionals, as well as the general professional who wants to get more out of LinkedIn. A full breakdown of the features included in premium accounts is included in Table 1. As a broad overview, the main features of paid accounts include the following functionality: 1. The ability to send a message to any other member within the LinkedIn community, whether they are a connection or not, through LinkedIn’s InMail tool. 2. Advanced search functionality allows premium users to view profile information of people not in their networks. For free account types, users will only see a limited amount of information for the people not in their networks. 3. See who has looked at your profile. While this is available for free accounts, premium account functionality allows users to get an extended list of who’s viewed their profile over the last 90 days. Basic members only see the last five people who have viewed their profile. In addition, premium members can organise who has viewed their profile by date, location, company, job and how they found their profile. 4. Premium members can have an open profile. An open profile allows members to find and get in touch with other professionals who are open to networking. This means that open profiles are open to allowing anyone to make contact with the open profile holder and will allow people not in their network to see their full details. 7 Open profiles are available to premium account holders and allow such holders to make their profile open, meaning that all of their details can be viewed even by LinkedIn members out of the account holders network. In addition, members with open profiles can be contacted by people not in their network via LinkedIn messages. That means that basic account holders do not need to pay for InMails to contact the open profile member.
  14. 14. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 14 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 There are two specific features to open profiles that premium members may value: a. Open profile takes away that cost for basic members to send messages via InMail who are not first-degree connections. Otherwise, basic users can only send free messages to their first-degree connections. b. Visibility within search results. Usually, when using LinkedIn’s search function, the details that people can see vary according to the closeness of their connections and also the membership level of the person searching. If you are not in someone’s network (that means your first-, second- and third-degree connections) then they won’t be able to see your name, just your job title and will only be able to see a reduced profile for you. Even third-degree connections will only see your first name and the first letter of your surname. However, members with an open profile can allow all of their details to be visible, no matter what their relationship with the person searching. This may be of benefit to people who want to make sure that they are easy to find. 5. With the ‘How You Rank’ tool, members can see how they compare to others in their network in terms of profile views and receive personalised recommendations on how to increase their visibility. 6. Top keyword suggestions – custom keyword suggestions for subscribers’ profiles to appear more often in search results. 7. Saved search alerts – alerts allow subscribers to stay up to date on key activities, such as searches for candidates, leads or other decision makers. 8. InMail messages – premium account holders can send direct messages to anyone on LinkedIn.
  15. 15. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 15 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Table 1: LinkedIn premium account types Premium account type Account features Cost (as of Sep-2015) Job Seeker (formerly ‘business’) 1. Three InMail credits per month for contacting recruiters and job posters directly. 2. Feature at the top of recruiters’ applicant lists. 3. See who’s viewed your profile in the last 90 days and how they found you. 4. Applicant insights – see how you compare with other job applicants. £19.99 pm Sales Navigator 1. Designed for sales professionals. 2. 15 InMail credits per month. 3. Advanced search. 4. Custom lead building functionality for creating lead lists. 5. Lead recommendations – discover more people at target accounts. 6. Who’s viewed your profile – see who has viewed your profile in the last 90 days and how they found you. 7. Unlimited profile search up to third-degree profiles. 8. Sales insight on accounts and leads. 9. Account pages – get company updates for targeted accounts. 10. TeamLink – find colleagues who can provide introductions to people at target accounts. £44.99 pm Recruiter Lite 1. LinkedIn for recruitment professionals. 2. General premium accounts features plus the following: a. 30 InMail credits per month with accompanying InMail templates. b. Advanced search, with search filters designed for recruiting. c. Candidate tracking functionality. d. Who’s viewed your profile – see who has viewed your profile in the last 90 days and how they found you. e. Unlimited profile search up to third-degree profiles. f. Integrated hiring allows users to manage their whole candidate pool via the LinkedIn Recruiter Lite interface. £64.95 pm Business Plus 1. 15 InMail messages per month. 2. Advanced search. 3. Who’s viewed your profile – see who has viewed your profile in the last 90 days and how they found you. £29.99 pm
  16. 16. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 16 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 3.1.2. Some features and functionality explained Premium Search In addition, premium subscribers can make use of dynamic tools such as premium search. This function allows registered LinkedIn members to narrow their results by searching with the same parameters as LinkedIn Advertising. It also allows premium users access to full profiles before choosing to contact them. Also, once a search is set up, premium users can get email alerts when new profiles are created or edited which match the search parameters. Table 2: Comparison of free and premium search functionality Basic profile search Premium profile search Relationship (e.g. first-degree connection) Location (country and city) Current company School Profile language Non-profit interests Relationship (e.g. first-degree connection) Location (country and city) Current company School Profile language Non-profit interests Shared groups Years of experience Function Seniority level Interested in Company size Figure 5: LinkedIn people search interface
  17. 17. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 17 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Who Viewed Your Profile? A key feature of LinkedIn is that it allows users to see who has been looking at their profiles. LinkedIn allows users to see who has viewed their profile if they, in turn, switch on the setting to allow others to see if they have viewed their profile. However, with a premium account, users can see who has been looking at their profile without having to give up their own viewing privacy. In addition, rather than simply seeing who has viewed the profile, users can also get to see which keywords people searched to get to their profile. As well as seeing the top keywords that people are using to find your profile, users can see more about people viewing their profile such as their industry and location. The following excerpt from the LinkedIn website provides a detailed explanation of the difference between the free and premium features regarding the ‘who’s viewed your profile’ functionality. LinkedIn basic and premium features Free account If you have your setting adjusted to display your name and headline when viewing profiles, you’ll see up to the most recent five viewers in the last 90 days, as well as a list of suggestions for increasing your profile views. Once you have five or more viewers in a 90-day period, you’ll see a graph of viewer trends above the list of viewers. The graph displays weekly trends for views of your profile over the past 90 days, as well as other viewer insights such as: – Where your viewers work and live. – Where they came from in finding you. – Their industry and job titles. Premium account You’ll see the entire list of viewers from the past 90 days. If you have at least one viewer in the past 90 days, you’ll also see the viewer trends and insights. In addition to the free account experience, you’ll be able to click into the weekly data points to drill your viewer list down to viewers from that week. You can do the same for viewer insights. With any account, you may see a row of suggested actions you can take to increase your profile views. These include prompts to follow influencers, join groups, and add skills. It can also include suggestions of people you may wish to connect to; however, these people didn’t view your profile. If you have a Premium account, you may need to scroll past this row to see the rest of your viewers. Note: If people choose the setting to remain anonymous when looking, even if you have a Premium account, you won’t see the names of viewers who chose to display themselves as anonymous. We respect the privacy of members who choose not to reveal information about themselves when viewing profiles. Source: LinkedIn8 8 https://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4508/~/who%E2%80%99s-viewed-your-profile--- basic-and-premium-features
  18. 18. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 18 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 InMail InMail messages are sent directly to another LinkedIn member that you are not connected to. This means that they are different to the messaging functionality for contacting existing connections. Thus, users that have a basic (free) account must upgrade to a premium account to use InMail. Members receive a specific number of InMail credits based on their subscription type. See Table 1 for details on InMail allocation per account type. Author’s opinion of LinkedIn premium In 2014, LinkedIn repositioned its premium account types to serve specific business cases: 1. Get hired: Job Seeker. 2. Find sales opportunities: Sales Navigator. 3. Find and recruit staff: Recruiter Lite. 4. Enhance your professional life: Business Plus. This was a ground-breaking move as it provided LinkedIn with a platform for repositioning its product to serve specific functions whereas in the past the organisation just had different levels of ‘business’ accounts. There is no doubt that the basic LinkedIn account offers much in the way of functionality and may be all that is required for some individuals. However, in my (the author’s) view, if you have specific business goals, particularly around any of the business cases that LinkedIn has used to formulate its premium accounts, then it is worth the investment. I would suggest that the decision to pay for LinkedIn Premium should be a simple one for job seekers, sales professionals, recruiters and, of course, business development stakeholders. I myself have a Business Plus account which I find invaluable as a business development tool as it enables me to elevate my profile among fellow professionals with whom I share mutual connections and/or interests. Furthermore, I find the InMail feature useful for contacting potential business contacts that I don’t know, even more useful than emailing. The key thing to remember is that while premium accounts offer extra layers of functionality, they only deliver real value when account holders make the effort to exploit that functionality. My account provides me with the following functionality:  Ability to see full profiles of everyone on LinkedIn, regardless of whether or not they are in my network.  15 InMail messages per month.  Advanced search.  Who’s viewed my profile.  I can save search alerts which allow me to get notified when new profiles fit the criteria that I have specified.
  19. 19. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 19 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 3.2. The Anatomy of your personal LinkedIn account 3.2.1. Your LinkedIn homepage Having signed into your personal LinkedIn account, your first visible page is the LinkedIn homepage. The homepage has been designed to encourage interactivity by displaying analytics and traffic on your own profile, a data feed displaying news and sponsored content based on your contacts and followed companies, and some simple suggestions for keeping in touch with existing contacts. The homepage has been designed to direct users to engage with LinkedIn in some way: 1. The profile analytics at the top displays some highlight analytics such as to how many people viewed your profile and the number of views on recent updates. It also includes triggers for users to update their profile as well as the opportunity to drill down into more analytics data. 2. The upper-right corner of the page shows updates for contacts and also suggestions for new contacts via an animated carousel. This allows users to make new connections directly from the homepage. 3. The bulk of the homepage is made up of the newsfeed which includes updates from connections and followed companies as well as targeted sponsored content and advertisements. 4. On the right, LinkedIn may display advertising and suggest companies to follow. Figure 6: The anatomy of the LinkedIn home page
  20. 20. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 20 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 3.2.2. Your LinkedIn profile page Your profile page represents an excellent opportunity for presenting yourself as professional, credible, approachable and trustworthy. This is the gateway to your professional identity and will be used by potential business partners, employers and sales targets to evaluate whether or not they would like to do business with you. Your profile is a snapshot of your professional and personal brand. Think of it as a digital advertisement which has the sole purpose of selling you and your accomplishments. Investing time to craft a compelling profile is the single most important aspect of your LinkedIn marketing strategy. This report is not designed to go through the process of creating a LinkedIn profile. The LinkedIn user interface does an excellent job of walking users through this process. From a best practice point of view, you can optimise your LinkedIn profile by including the following information: 1. A high-quality avatar photograph. Displaying a quality photo really matters and represents a key part of your personal brand. First impressions count. LinkedIn’s own research shows that just having a picture makes your profile a staggering 14 times more likely to be viewed by others. Here are some LinkedIn profile photo tips9: a. Choose a photo that clearly looks like you. That means choosing a photo that is up-to-date and so isn’t 20 years old or before you grew a beard! A rule of thumb is that the picture should reflect what you look like on a daily basis (glasses, make-up, hairstyle etc.) b. LinkedIn recommends that your face should take up 60% of the frame. This means not including other people in the picture and only including your head and shoulders. c. Choose a professional expression. This means appearing professional, friendly and approachable. Potential business contacts need to see you as somebody that they can imagine having a good conversation with. d. Be dressed for work. e. Avoid distracting backgrounds. The background should be simple so your face can be the focal point of the picture. 2. Customise your LinkedIn URL. This is useful for adding the URL to your email auto signature and business cards. 3. Populate your LinkedIn headline to showcase your personal brand. By default, LinkedIn will populate your profile headline with your current job title and employer. Most people do not change this. Remember, you are defining yourself by your own personal brand, not your current job title. With that in mind, populate your LinkedIn headline to showcase your personal brand. The following are some approaches you might consider when crafting your LinkedIn headline: a. What you do, how you do it and who you are doing it for e.g. digital marketing consultant who teaches digital marketing courses using novel examples and hands-on workshops for various corporate clients. You could also include adding details regarding proof of experience e.g. ‘Delivered over 1,000 seats of training to date’. 9 5 Tips for Picking the Right LinkedIn Profile Picture. Available from: https://business.linkedin.com/talent-solutions/blog/2014/12/5-tips-for-picking-the-right-linkedin-profile- picture
  21. 21. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 21 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 b. Using profile keywords and explaining your niche area of expertise e.g. ‘Digital Marketing – Specialising in upskilling marketing teams in all things digital.’ c. If you are looking for work/clients consider asking a question followed by what problems you can solve. For example: ‘Need to train your team in the latest digital marketing skills? Digital marketing trainer that has worked with a range of large corporate clients specialising in upskilling in-house teams.’ 4. Provide contact information. It is up to you whether to make your contact information available. The optimal strategy is of course to make this information available and indeed provide people with multiple ways of contacting you based on what is most appropriate for them. That means including an up-to- date landline/mobile phone number, email address, Twitter handle, Skype username and, if appropriate, up to two related websites. Figure 7: Anatomy of an up-to-date profile page 5. Complete your summary to provide an accurate description of yourself. The summary remains one of the most important sections on your LinkedIn profile page in the manner of a summary on a curriculum vitae/resume. It is the only area on your profile where you can define yourself from scratch, kindling the interest of others and encouraging people to connect with you. Consequently, you need to ensure you project an authentic description of yourself which truly reflects your professional abilities. When completing your summary consider the following: a. Who is your audience and what do they expect to see? b. Articulate your operating principles and the things that ‘energise’ you. For example, in my own profile this equates to “digital innovation, new disruptive technologies and training”. Describe your skills, experience and tasks you think you do better than anyone else. Make the content easy to read by dividing content into short bullet points. c. Consider adding points of differentiation or a snippet of your personal interests. d. Write your summary as if you were taking a moment to introduce yourself to potential clients. Consider how they would like you to present to them.
  22. 22. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 22 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Writing your LinkedIn profile summary “Choosing the right words can be incredibly effective as in demonstrating your talents without arrogance and not appearing to be self-absorbed. Key questions to ask include: Are you in command of your narrative? Does your summary do you professional justice? “A summary is a short version of why you do what you do, in your own words. It is not enough just to let your experience speak for itself but you need a narrative to ensure that your professional online prospectus is unique, engaging and well written. Your summary is your chance to not only say what you’re good at, it’s also your opportunity to differentiate yourself, in a remarkable and memorable way.” Andy Foote, LinkedIn commentator10 The image below shows a detailed summary page of Ashley Friedlein, Econsultancy’s Founder, with added SlideShare presentations. Figure 8: Example of a LinkedIn profile which integrates SlideShare presentations via the summary section 10 http://www.linkedinsights.com/3-stunningly-good-linkedin-profile-summaries/
  23. 23. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 23 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 6. Use SlideShare presentations to support your summary. Integrating SlideShare presentations into your profile is an often under-utilised tool which can be useful in establishing professional credibility and trust. SlideShare is a useful tool for sharing presentations, videos, infographics, personal portfolios and PDF documents. Its strategic importance as a tool to enhance connections via visual content is demonstrated by LinkedIn integrating it into a new tab in its navigation menu under ‘interests’ and integrating it in a primary position to support profile summaries as shown in Figure 11. 7. Use recommendations to endorse your work. A powerful tactic for validating professional credentials is the addition of recommendations from business colleagues and clients. This reinforces your personal brand and demonstrates credibility. When editing your LinkedIn profile, there is an option to request a recommendation. You can be recommended for any of the positions you have listed on your profile. LinkedIn will display the relationship of the person providing the recommendation for the time that the recommendation applies. Figure 9: Accessing the ‘ask for recommendations tool’ on LinkedIn 8. Add endorsements. Endorsements are a quick way to provide you and your first-degree connections with the opportunity to endorse one another for a specific skill. Endorsements have been widely used but have limited value as people who endorse you may never have worked with you, but from
  24. 24. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 24 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 data collection and marketing perspective, it will enable you to be filtered and found against a wider portfolio of skills. 9. Edit your background. LinkedIn allows you to edit your background and add an image which can be very powerful for branding purposes. Figure 10: Ashley Friedlein’s background image 3.2.3. The value of completing your personal LinkedIn profile A key marketing benefit in completing your profile page is to ensure that you will appear in LinkedIn’s search results as expressed through the profile strength tab displayed in the top right of your profile page. This is only accessible to the profile owner. When you have completed an up-to-date profile page, LinkedIn evaluates its completeness by ranking its profile strength. Achieving an ‘all-star’ profile weighting will dramatically improve the potential of you being found in LinkedIn’s own search results when anyone searches for your job function heading. Figure 11: Profile completeness and its impact on profile strength
  25. 25. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 25 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Let us explain how an ‘all-star’ status impacts your LinkedIn visibility. If someone searched on my last name or job headline and my profile page was incomplete i.e. ‘expert’, ‘intermediate’ or ‘beginner’, all of the other ‘all-star’ profiles would rank higher and push me down the LinkedIn search rankings. LinkedIn’s search algorithm filters and displays results in this order: 1. Profile completeness (100% only). 2. Connections in common (shared). 3. Connections by degree in descending order. 4. Groups in common (shared). 3.2.4. Personal profile best practice Profile completeness is a key contributory factor for maximising B2B marketers’ visibility for any potential clients searching for your profession or service. LinkedIn’s own research has shown that a fully completed profile will increase your chances of being found 40-fold. In addition, this also substantially improves your chances of returning in Google organic search rankings, should somebody search for your name, given that LinkedIn is a highly trusted and authoritative domain. Below are some profile recommendations for achieving an ‘All-Star’ status:  Update your current work industry and location.  Make sure you select an industry that best suits your current situation from the choices given.  An up-to-date summary with a description.  Craft an up-to-date professional story, in your own style.  Last two career positions.  Include at least your last two previous job roles, including titles.  Your education – populate your key education milestones, including school, university, degree and qualifications.  Your skills – you need to select a minimum of three skills to get a 100% completed profile.  Include a professional photo.  Build a minimum network of 50 first-degree connections.  Connect with colleagues, business partners, alumni etc. The number of connections that an individual has can be seen as a trust factor for somebody choosing to interact with you. 3.2.5. Functionality: see who has viewed your LinkedIn profile This functionality provides excellent business insights into who is looking at your profile, who has looked at your posts and how you rank in comparison to your first-degree connections. This may make have ‘fly on the wall’ connotations when you first start using it but it can provide some useful data and insights for B2B marketers.
  26. 26. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 26 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 12: LinkedIn profile analytics Understanding the value of the LinkedIn personal profile – the foundation stone of LinkedIn This tool can provide B2B marketers with invaluable insights, including the following:  Quickly and easily recognise the type of people and businesses who are showing interest in you as a representative of the brand you work for. This might include post-campaign analysis or better understanding new client activity as a result of your B2B marketing efforts.  Access more ‘granular’ (i.e. segmented) data from views to give you marketing insights into: – Where your viewers work and live. – The source of their referral and how they came to find you. – Their industry and job titles. – How you currently rank in profile visibility against your contemporaries.  The impact of your Pulse posts on your first-degree network and insights on demographic profile of your readers. For more on LinkedIn Pulse, see Section 6.  The ‘how you rank’ tool, shown in Figure 12, shows your ranking by profile views compared to others in your network and can facilitate the following:
  27. 27. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 27 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 – Generation of ideas for changes from the top five performers in your network and inspiring changes to your own profile. – Affording a better understanding of content used by the top performers and offering up inspiration on ways to boost profile views and drive opportunities for advancement. 3.3. Using the ‘advanced search’ function One of the most powerful features of the LinkedIn platform is its dynamic search capability, ‘advanced search’. Part of Premium account paid accounts, it is an invaluable tool in terms of simplicity, ease of use and the quality of data you can obtain and, of course, store. Figure 13: LinkedIn advanced people search filtering options Advanced search is accessible through clicking on the ‘advanced’ button as shown in the image above. 3.3.1. Using the ‘advanced search’ function – tips Below are some tips for using advanced search for your B2B marketing: 1. Use precise data searching. All the data captured from LinkedIn’s 400 million plus subscribers is in a structured format. This means that you can actually specify query terms for specific fields as shown above. For example, if you’re searching for individuals working as a ‘senior digital marketer’ within the insurance sector in the UK, you can do this via the filter options. 2. Advanced search allows for Boolean search.
  28. 28. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 28 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Boolean-type search is available, meaning that you can combine keywords with operators such as ‘and’, ‘not’ and ‘or’ to produce more relevant results. For example, a Boolean search could be ‘Head of Marketing’ AND ‘New York’. 3. Advanced sorting. Advanced search can sort search results by a number of degrees from you, which is particularly useful for marketing if you are trying to find people closest to you in your network. 4. Saving and updating data. You can use the ‘saved search’ button in advanced search to save up to seven extensive saved data searches a month as shown below. LinkedIn will allow you to set up an instant email/text alert to notify you directly when any new subscribers matching your advanced search criteria have joined the LinkedIn database. Figure 14: LinkedIn saved searches function 3.4. Managing your connections tab  Add connections. LinkedIn allows you to seamlessly synchronise your contact data via other sources such as Hotmail, Gmail or Microsoft Outlook as shown here: Figure 15: Adding connections
  29. 29. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 29 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016  Connect with alumni. The LinkedIn ‘find alumni’ tool provides you with information about how to connect with alumni and former colleagues by identifying institutions where you have worked and studied, and can show potential contacts based on timeline.
  30. 30. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 30 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 4. Company Pages One of the best marketing opportunities on LinkedIn for your business is setting up your own company page. This service is free and relatively easy to set up. Through a company page you can market your business to the LinkedIn network, telling your own company’s story and giving customers and potential customers a forum to learn about your business, employees and brand(s). LinkedIn company pages “The biggest risk of not having a company page, especially for B2B, is a loss of discoverability. LinkedIn is becoming the de-facto starting point when searching for partners and evaluating solutions.” Shane Atchison, CEO at Possible11 LinkedIn’s own research has shown that LinkedIn members are 50% more likely to purchase from a company which they like and engage with.12 Company pages are not just the preserve of larger company brands, they can be easily resourced by smaller businesses provided there is a consistent content output in terms of regular posting or newsfeed. 11 https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/business/marketing- solutions/global/en_US/campaigns/pdfs/soph-guide-refresh0827-eng-us.pdf 12 https://business.linkedin.com/marketing-solutions/blog/s/set-your-company-success-linkedin- company-pages-part-1
  31. 31. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 31 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 4.1. Anatomy of a LinkedIn company page The infographic below lays out the key components of a LinkedIn company page. Figure 16: The anatomy of a company page: Econsultancy For marketing purposes, a LinkedIn ‘Company Page’ is an opportunity for you to:  Display your brand vision and mission statement/purpose: e.g. Econsultancy’s clear vision in red: “We’re here to help you achieve digital excellence”.  Engage with new advocates and followers and update them on relevant activities such as events and digital training.  Drive word of mouth at scale.  Enable followers to join debates regarding relevant industry news.  Use the ‘showcase page’ function to highlight specific products or services to a specific demographic market.  Segment company services into differing local geo-demographic regions.
  32. 32. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 32 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 4.2. Company pages tips and best practice Below are some best practice tips for creating a successful company page: 1. Complete a detailed company description. Before you create a company page description, it is important to understand the audience you are trying to reach. One method of doing so is to run a quick search for subscribers who fit your customer profile and then investigate their profiles to identify the types of companies they currently follow by scrolling down on their individual profile pages. This will help you decide how to position your page. Once you have completed this task create a simple, clear description of your business proposition which is strong enough to build followers. Use rich, descriptive language that helps readers understand your vision, purpose and the value you offer. Optimise to ensure company pages are very SEO-friendly. Google shows previews of up to 156 characters of your page text, so be sure your description leads with powerful, keyword-rich sentences. Members can also search for companies by keyword on LinkedIn, so include words and phrases that describe your business, expertise and industry focus. 2. Include company images. Add your hero image – minimum 974 x 330 pixels – and your company logo. 3. Make the page easy to find. Make sure to take advantage of your existing online properties by linking to your page from your company website, blog, Twitter and other social platforms. Company pages also rank highly in Google organic search so adding this information means you will have one more property appearing in the top search results for your company. The upshot is that it will make it even easier for professionals to find you. 4. Allocate consistent content resources and company updates. Once you decide to have a company page, it is important that you resource it properly, which means posting regular updates to keep your company followers engaged. In terms of resourcing and frequency of updates, a good starting point is to take a look at your competitors’ pages and see if they are active and what kind of engagement they get. Then use this insight to plan a test period for resourcing, for example three months, and test differing content types, styles and frequency. 5. Use analytics to inform your content plan. You can use the excellent company page analytics to track engagement on posts, follower growth, and key metrics and trends. You can then use this invaluable data to optimise, refine and improve your content plan. Company analytics will provide the following information: a. Audience data: all company followers. b. Impressions: the number of times each update is shown to LinkedIn members. c. Clicks: the number of clicks on the content, the company name or the company logo. d. Interactions: the number of times people have liked, commented on or shared each update. e. Engagement: the number of interactions plus the number of clicks and followers acquired, divided by the number of impressions. 6. Use sponsored updates to help grow followers. Depending on your company size and budgets available, a recommendation for growing your company page followers is using sponsored updates. Sponsored updates allow you to distribute content, whitepapers or relevant events to more specifically targeted demographic groups. LinkedIn offers pinpoint-accuracy targeting for reaching specific audiences.
  33. 33. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 33 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 7. Use the ‘showcase pages’ function to segment your company brands. Showcase pages are extensions of your company page, designed for spotlighting a sub-brand, business unit or service. It makes sense to create a showcase page when you want to establish a dedicated page to represent a brand, business unit or specific service. For marketing purposes, this creates a dedicated sub-product page with its own messages and audience segments to share with. 4.3. Company page management and best practice It is worth investing the time to manage and design your company page from day one, as your organisation will appear professional and credible. Before you create a new company page, check whether a page has already been started by one of your employees, ex-employees or supporters. If so, you can ‘claim‘ it and save confusion later on, as it is very difficult to get a LinkedIn company page deleted once it has been set up and employees have ‘linked’ to it. Make sure you also check for alternative or misspelled versions of your organisation’s name. Below are some best practice suggestions:  Assign administrators. Assign administrators for your company page, so that there is always someone who can access it. Develop a plan for when staff leave so that they can be removed.  Include logos and imagery. Cover image = 646 x 200 pixels. The cover image option gives you an opportunity to add an eye-catching and attractive graphic that visually sums up your organisation’s brand. You could use it to show pictures of your employees, or to display changing messages supporting campaigns you are running.  Check your employee list and consider providing employees with content so that they present a consistent view of the company. Under ‘careers’/’view all employees’, you’ll be able to see a list of everyone on LinkedIn who has listed your organisation as their current employer. A note on showcase pages Adding showcase pages for individual company brands will require more content resourcing if your goal is to develop new segmented audience for each product.13 13 Specific element of a showcase page: https://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/44864/ft/eng
  34. 34. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 34 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 17: Example of product showcase pages
  35. 35. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 35 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 5. LinkedIn Groups Setting up a group is a great opportunity for marketing professionals to build thought leadership in the same industry, make business contacts, share quality content, find answers and establish yourself in your industry niche. Groups vary in size, ranging from the huge groups of over 100,000 to more specialist groups such as the author’s group below, ‘Future Thinking in Digital Marketing’. LinkedIn allows you to join up to 50 groups by using the search feature at the top of your homepage or viewing suggestions of groups you may like. Your chosen groups are then displayed as part of your profile page. Figure 18: An example of a group page
  36. 36. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 36 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 5.1. How to set up your own LinkedIn group Once you have considered your group subject you can start a new group by filling out the fields on the ‘create a group page’ tab in groups under the ‘interest’ section of the top navigation and populate the following information:  Group name.  Group summary – enter a brief description about your group and its purpose which will appear in the group’s directory.  Group description – include a full description of this group which will appear on your group pages.  Consider developing a group logo.  Agree access approval process. The owner and manager of any group can then assign other members to be managers or moderators once you have set up a group page. 5.2. Best practice tips for running a group Running a group can be time-consuming and should be viewed as a long-term project. Here are some tips:  Keep the group open as opposed to a closed members-only group. The main difference is the restrictions of members-only group discussions which can only be seen by other group members. Open group discussion threads can be seen by anyone on the web and can be shared on other social networking platforms, making them much effective for marketing and being found.  Post regular content which fits the profile of your group members. It is important to try to post regular content, a minimum of one post a day to really build engagement. This is a vital component of an active group to encourage engagement and participation. Members also benefit. In Q1 2014 LinkedIn introduced a new way to encourage users to contribute more in LinkedIn groups by launching a ‘top contributor’ icon visible to all members and to any outsider viewing your profile.  Respond to discussions via the commenting and liking platforms. This encourages wider discussion and lets members know the kind of discussions and content you prefer, especially as the group manager.  Invite your first-degree connections to join, require approval for all members and don’t hesitate to reject members if they do not fit the group’s purpose.  Moderate posted content. Select the 100% moderation setting in the ‘manager’ tab. The downside is this might create extra work but the upside is you eradicate any spam at source.  Be the friendly guide if group members need advice and also have a practical and clear set of group rules to adhere to. Maximise the impact of your welcome message template and include useful information like the group rules.
  37. 37. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 37 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 6. About Pulse: The LinkedIn Publisher Platform LinkedIn’s publishing platform, Pulse, allows individuals to write posts which are published in the Pulse section of the LinkedIn site and the LinkedIn app. Pulse posts are blog-like which means that other LinkedIn users can like, share and comment on these posts. Figure 19: One way is to select ‘Pulse’ from the ‘interests’ dropdown in the main navigation
  38. 38. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 38 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 20: LinkedIn Pulse homepage. Users can publish their own posts by clicking on ‘publish post’ in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Figure 21: Posts can also be seen published directly from the LinkedIn homepage
  39. 39. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 39 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 22: LinkedIn Pulse Editor The LinkedIn Pulse editor looks very similar to other publishing platforms. Writers are encouraged to add a landscape image, a topical and keyword-rich headline and their post. Writers can add multimedia content such as imagery and videos into posts. Similar to WordPress posts, writers can also add tags to categorise their content. The features allow you to label posts with appropriate tags such as ‘multichannel marketing’, ‘IOT’, etc. Note that posts can be published immediately or saved for publishing later. 6.1. Pulse integration within the Newsfeed How does Pulse integrate into a subscriber’s newsfeed? Pulse content is ranked, ordered and delivered based on a subscriber’s own newsfeed preferences, tailored to your professional interests on the Pulse app and accessible via the main navigation under ‘interests’. LinkedIn members can choose to ‘follow’ other LinkedIn members who publish regularly. For this reason, it can be useful to position yourself and publish content based on your area of expertise.
  40. 40. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 40 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 6.2. LinkedIn Pulse best practice The value of Pulse is twofold. Firstly, it is a great content marketing platform for writing and sharing relevant topical content, and distributing it either via your own personal network, through posting on relevant groups or distributing through posted updates. Figure 23: Published Pulse posts are added to your profile page as shown below At the time of writing, the author’s Pulse posts have achieved an average of 200 to 300 views, 20 to 30 clicks and between three and five comments per post from first-degree connections. The second benefit of using Pulse is if content is deemed to be good enough, it can be picked up and published by LinkedIn to its full network of some 400 million plus users, the impact being dramatic in terms of engagement. So how do you write content good enough to be picked up by Pulse and viewed by over 400 million users worldwide? LinkedIn is vague about how Pulse evaluates a post to distribute beyond your first-degree connections. It does however provide the following explanation in its help centre14: “Relevant and high-quality long-form posts will be naturally distributed through member engagement such as views, likes, comments, and shares. Depending on the 14 Distribution of long-form posts – LinkedIn’s Publishing Platform: https://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/47542/ft/eng
  41. 41. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 41 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 community’s engagement, some long-form posts may have better metrics and wider distribution than others. “Our goal is to match the right content with the right professional. This ensures that every member sees customised professional news and insights that inform and inspire them.” Published posts will be shared with first-degree connections and followers. This content may be shared among your connections’ followers and their first-degree connections. In addition, it may collect likes and comments. In practice, it would appear that if a post reaches a certain threshold and shares, it may get picked up by the wider LinkedIn Pulse network, making the content available more widely to LinkedIn users. While it is very tricky to be picked up by Pulse’s wider network, the activity of publishing quality content on Pulse may be a worthwhile time investment as this content can be repurposed for your company page or indeed via relevant LinkedIn Groups. The activity will allow you to measure which topics work well for you in order to allow you to refine your approach for future posts. Strategically, Pulse may offer a glimpse of where LinkedIn is headed in the future: providing a robust, easy to use content marketing platform for members to publish their own content, helping them strengthen their business connections. 6.3. About LinkedIn Elevate – harnessing the power of employees A key opportunity for marketers using Pulse is in harnessing the LinkedIn networks of employees to encourage them to publish content which can be utilised by the company to extend its reach. To meet this need, LinkedIn has created Elevate. The goal of Elevate is to enable companies to manage or curate content and deliver it to employees, who are encouraged to share the content with their own connections and via wider social network channels. LinkedIn Elevate “Lots of professionals share content – like articles, blog posts, and presentations – on social and professional networks to strengthen their professional brands. And lots of companies share content on social and professional networks to attract talent, and market and sell their products and services. But relatively few companies recognise that when they empower their employees to be social professionals, they not only change the trajectory of their employees’ careers, they change the trajectory of their businesses as well. “For example, when a LinkedIn member shares six pieces of content, on average, they receive six profile views and make two new connections, which help them strengthen their professional brands. At the same time, the company they work for receives six job views, three Company Page views, and one Company Page follower, which helps them better hire, market, and sell. Despite that, our research shows that only 2% of employees share content their company has shared on LinkedIn. Yet they drive tremendous value. They’re responsible for about 20% of the overall engagement – clicks, likes, comments, and shares – that content receives. That’s not surprising given employees have 10 times more connections than their company has followers, and people tend to be considered more authentic than companies.” Source: LinkedIn blog post15 15 http://blog.linkedin.com/2015/04/13/elevate/
  42. 42. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 42 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 6.4. LinkedIn Elevate’s functionality Elevate works by enabling businesses to distribute relevant content to employees to share with their networks to help boost engagement and connections for their companies. LinkedIn has provided its own definition for Elevate:16 “LinkedIn Elevate combines algorithmic recommendations from LinkedIn Pulse and human curation to line up content, and gauges audience activity to suggest the best times for employees to share posts for maximum visibility.” Elevate seems to be aimed at harnessing the wider appeal to a company’s larger pool of employees, effectively co-opting them into the larger social media marketing effort. For them, one carrot is that they can use Elevate to track how sharing content leads to more profile views and other stats. This product is supported by LinkedIn’s own data which shows that only about 2% of a company’s employees share their company’s news on LinkedIn. Regardless, collectively those employees will have ten times the connections on LinkedIn as their company employing them does. Note: LinkedIn Elevate is only available for use by employees at participating companies. In addition, the app offers analytics for employees, so they can see how much traction their shared content received, in the form of likes, comments and re-shares. Companies get to see this data too, along with job views and company page followers brought in by said content. 6.5. Considerations for making Elevate available to staff While Elevate makes it easy for companies to recommend content for their employees to share, this does not mean it is useful for every type of organisation. Rolling out Elevate for staff may require the right corporate culture where staff are effectively bought in. For this reason, it is recommended that, as with any digital marketing opportunity, this needs to be tested carefully. Remember that staff should be sharing content because they want to, not because they have been told to. There is no doubt though that if Elevate is implemented appropriately and with buy-in from all staff, it could be a useful tool both for making people aware of your business but also for hiring purposes. LinkedIn says that when a member shares six pieces of content, on average, they receive six profile views and make two new connections, while the company they work for receives six job views, three Company Page views, and one Company Page follower.17 For this reason, Elevate may be a very useful tool for exposing the company to new audiences at the very least. 16 http://thenextweb.com/apps/2015/04/13/linkedins-launching-a-tool-for-companies-to-prod- employees-to-share-content/#gref 17 http://www.itechsum.com/thenextweb/item/164658-linkedin-s-launching-a-tool-for-companies-to- prod-employees-to-share-content
  43. 43. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 43 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 7. An Overview of LinkedIn Advertising Opportunities LinkedIn is a useful tool for businesses and individuals to advertise to the LinkedIn member base. LinkedIn advertising is quite unique from SEM or display buying. Individuals use LinkedIn to better their careers, find a new job, network and connect with business contacts. As such, advertising on LinkedIn seeks to reach out to people in that headspace which means that it represents a useful tool for B2B advertising. While LinkedIn doesn’t necessarily position content at the moment that an individual is seeking that content, as is the case with search engine marketing, from a B2B point of view it offers value as it is a social network specifically for professionals and so delivers business-focused content. So, should you be looking to deliver a message to a business audience, it’s got everything you need: the right network with the right context, and from an advertising point of view, less competition than other platforms for your targets’ attention. Advertisers typically do not make the same use of LinkedIn as an advertising medium on the same scale as they make use of channels such as Google and Facebook. 7.1. Types of LinkedIn advertising: enterprise solutions LinkedIn targeting capabilities enable marketers to reach potential customers according to attributes such as industry, function, seniority and company size. LinkedIn Marketing Solutions include: 1. Onsite display ads Advertisers can use the same targeting engine used for LinkedIn ads to serve ads in a variety of sizes and formats, including rich media, to the 400+ million plus members on the LinkedIn network. Additional LinkedIn-specific formats are also available, including ads to encourage members to join groups and follow companies. a. ‘Follow company’ ads. As the name suggests, this kind of ad’s main objective is to encourage people to ‘follow’ the company on LinkedIn. b. Spotlight ads. Spotlight ads are designed to help people find a job by associating their profile picture with a company logo. These ads are effective because they show a member’s image in the ad under the headline, ‘Picture yourself at [company name]’ and their new job title under their name. This lets them visualise themselves in this position at your company.18 c. ‘Join group’ ads. As the name suggests, these ads are designed to encourage people to join LinkedIn groups. 18 http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/243440
  44. 44. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 44 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 24: Example of a ‘follow company’ ad 2. Network display ads LinkedIn also now offers off-network advertising19 which enables advertisers to extend their advertising reach across LinkedIn’s network of business publisher sites. 3. Sponsored InMails Sponsored InMail gives advertisers the ability to send a long-form message to any LinkedIn user through its InMail messaging function. 19 https://investors.linkedin.com/results-and-financials/annual-reports/default.aspx
  45. 45. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 45 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 25: Example of a sponsored InMail branded by Econsultancy in association with Adobe The information in the following table has been sourced from LinkedIn’s marketing material20 and represents a comparison between onsite display ads and network display ads. As the names suggest, onsite display ads will only appear on LinkedIn whereas network display ads will appear on LinkedIn, LinkedIn properties like SlideShare and its wider publishing network. Table 3: Onsite display ads and network display ads comparison Onsite displays ads Network display ads Targeting options Location Company (size, industry, name) Job (title and seniority) Other options include targeting based on: schools, groups, gender, age Custom segments Location Company (size, industry, name) Job (title, seniority) Supported ad units 300x250, 160x600 Native ads in 300x250 size 3300x250, 160x600, 728x90, 300x600, 336x280 Inventory LinkedIn LinkedIn SlideShare LinkedIn publisher network Ad exchanges Campaign analytics Impressions Clicks by audience Site analytics by audience Actions by audience Visitor index and trends Impressions Clicks Actions New visitor and funnel impact Site analytics by audience Actions by audience Visitor index and trends 20 https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/business/marketing-solutions/regional/en- uk/Site%20Assets/PDFs/productsheets/Display%20Advertising_UK%20.pdf
  46. 46. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 46 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 It is worth pointing out that onsite display ads and network display ads do not need to be treated as mutually exclusive. They can both be used effectively for top-of-the-funnel marketing. 7.2. Sponsored updates Sponsored updates are content-rich promoted updates that enable advertisers to share and amplify content marketing messages to a targeted audience. Sponsored updates appear in the desktop, tablet and mobile streams of targeted members’ LinkedIn newsfeeds.21 Sponsored updates are useful to get the company’s message directly onto a user’s home feed. This offering is comparable to sponsored content on Facebook and so is a useful tool for amplifying useful content. Like LinkedIn advertising, sponsored updates are targeted which means that content can be targeted at the right audience. This means that messaging can be tailored depending on the target audience e.g. senior sales analysts, sales managers, chief information officers etc. Sponsored updates are useful for:  Targeting useful content to the appropriate target audience (via desktop and mobile).  Attracting new followers to the company page (and boosting engagement).  Test messaging to ascertain what kind of messaging attracts the most activity. Figure 26: LinkedIn sponsored content sample 7.2.1. Company updates, direct sponsored content and sponsored updates Let’s begin with company updates. A company update is simply a message posted on the LinkedIn company page by a company page administrator. These are unpaid and so are not targeted. The updates will appear on the company page and in the newsfeeds of LinkedIn users who follow the company. Direct sponsored content and sponsored updates are different from company updates as these are targeted and must be paid for. 21 http://investors.linkedin.com/annuals.cfm
  47. 47. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 47 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 7.2.2. The difference between direct sponsored content and sponsored updates Sponsored updates  Sponsored updates are like an extension of a company page update except that they are sponsored to extend reach.  Sponsored updates allow advertisers to distribute company updates to targeted LinkedIn members outside of their company page visitors and followers.  Sponsored updates will appear in the feed of targeted LinkedIn members as well as on the company page.  Sponsored updates are managed via LinkedIn Campaign Manager on either a cost per thousand impressions (CPM) or cost per click (CPC) model. Direct sponsored content  Direct sponsored content is like a sponsored update except that it does not appear on the company page. The content looks like a normal sponsored update in the newsfeed except that only people targeted by the campaign will be able to see it.  Direct sponsored content allows advertisers to create their own content to sponsor on behalf of the company, without changing the tone of their company page and without first posting a company update. According to LinkedIn, direct sponsored content “allows your company to personalise, test, and improve your company’s messages to improve the performance of your content for a targeted audience without cluttering the company page”.22  Direct sponsored content updates are managed via LinkedIn Campaign Manager on either a cost per thousand impressions (CPM) or cost per click (CPC) model.  Direct sponsored content updates do not necessarily have to be created by administrators of the company page. They do however require permission from the company page administrator.23  Direct sponsored content has a character limit of 160 and doesn’t currently support rich media such as images, presentations or documents. 22 https://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/50999/~/difference-between-direct-sponsored- content-and-sponsored-updates 23 https://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/50244
  48. 48. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 48 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 7.3. LinkedIn Ads LinkedIn Ads is a self-service platform that enables advertisers to create their own text-based ads and targets them to LinkedIn members. Like sponsored content, ads can be targeted to people based on their profile information. 7.4. Who can be targeted with LinkedIn advertisements and sponsored content? LinkedIn ads are highly targeted. Targeting options within LinkedIn are robust and well-suited to the professional audience on LinkedIn. Targeting options focus on professional affiliations, rather than personal attributes/interests/likes in comparison to Facebook. Ads can be targeted based on the following criteria: 1. Geographic location: United States, United Kingdom, Ireland etc. 2. Industry: banking, insurance etc. 3. Company name/industry/size 4. Job title: Sales Manager, Sales Director, Sales Analyst, Chief Information Officer etc. 5. Job seniority 6. Job function 7. Listed skills: sales management, data analysis, data mapping etc. 8. Member schools 9. Fields of study 10. Degree 11. Groups: ‘Business Intelligence Group’, ‘Sales and Marketing Analysts’, ‘Marketing and Sales Analysts’ etc. 12. Gender 13. Age: 18 – 24, 25 – 34, 35 – 54, 55+ These targeting options can be blended in order to create tightly focused campaigns which zero in on your target audience. Note that LinkedIn targeting operates under the inclusion method. This means that for every layer of targeting (location, job title etc.) that is added to the campaign, the target audience will get narrower (and thus more focused).
  49. 49. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 49 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 27: Overview of LinkedIn Campaign Manager
  50. 50. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 50 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 Figure 28: LinkedIn attributes decreasing audience size 7.4.1. Anatomy of a LinkedIn text advertisement LinkedIn ads are different to those run through AdWords because they include a photo and are not search-based. That means that while ads are highly targeted, they don’t relate to content that the LinkedIn user may be searching for at that particular moment. For this reason, LinkedIn ads have an average click-through rate of .025%. These ads appear in a number of places, such as the side and footer of the LinkedIn homepage. Figure 29: LinkedIn ad, right-hand side of newsfeed, tall format Figure 30: Anatomy of a LinkedIn ad, long-form format 1. Headline. 25 characters. This is an incredibly limited number of characters to grab somebody’s attention and so needs to be short and snappy. One tactic is to use headlines that are catered to each target segment. For example, ‘Attention sales managers’ etc.
  51. 51. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 51 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 2. Ad copy. 75 characters to provide a brief description of what is being offered. Ideally, the 75 characters should also include a call to action. Figure 31 uses the description: ‘Migrate MapPoint data to eSpatial’s cloud based mapping solution today’. This is descriptive and contains a call to action. 3. Destination URL. A landing page for each campaign is recommended. Landing pages should ideally be tailored to the ad that the LinkedIn member has clicked. For tips on creating successful landing pages, see Econsultancy’s blog post on ‘12 essential PPC landing page success factors’: https://econsultancy.com/blog/62415-12-essential-ppc-landing-page- success-factors/. 4. Image. Unlike Google AdWords, LinkedIn ads contain small pictures. That means there is the option to upload an image which LinkedIn will automatically resize to fit the 50 x 50 pixel thumbnail square. Ads with images get up to 20% more clicks. There are typically three types of images advertisers on LinkedIn default to: images of people, their product or their logo. 7.5. Lead Accelerator (no longer active) Once your other acquisition channels higher up the funnel had done their jobs, LinkedIn Lead Accelerator was meant to enable you to nurture your prospects, design campaigns and maximise your chance of achieving lead conversions, pipeline contribution and customer acquisition. Figure 31: Measuring the impact of your programmes at every stage of the purchase process LinkedIn Lead Accelerator “When I ran marketing at a mobile start-up, we routinely compared the impact of each channel at each funnel stage. We plotted channels along two dimensions: volume of names and cost per lead. LinkedIn topped all other lead sources – across both dimensions and at every stage of the funnel. When it came to content distribution and lead generation, LinkedIn quickly became the first dollar budgeted each quarter.”24 Joe Chernov, former VP of Marketing at Kinvey, now VP of Content at HubSpot Note that Lead Accelerator was deactivated in early 2016. Industry reports indicate that LinkedIn is pushing Lead Accelerator’s functionalities into sponsored updates. 24 http://www.slideshare.net/linkedineurope/sophisticated-marketers-guide-uk
  52. 52. Guide to LinkedIn Marketing Solutions Page 52 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Copyright © Econsultancy.com Ltd 2016 7.6. Getting started with LinkedIn advertising LinkedIn ads can be managed via Campaign Manager25. Campaign Manager can be used for:  Text ads.  Sponsored updates. Campaign Manager will let users set up advertising accounts as well as create and manage campaigns. This includes entering conditions such as campaign start and end dates as well as managing ad spend. Anybody with a LinkedIn profile can get started with LinkedIn advertising via the Campaign Manager: https://www.linkedin.com/ad/start. Figure 32: LinkedIn Campaign Manager can be accessed via the ‘business services’ option in the LinkedIn navigation menu Within the LinkedIn Campaign Manager interface, the process of creating campaigns is intuitive as LinkedIn effectively guides users through each stage of the process. Figure 33: LinkedIn Campaign Manager Interface. Start a campaign by clicking on ‘create campaign’ 25 https://www.linkedin.com/ad/start

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