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Track 4_Dale Uitto_2014 Paper

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Track 4_Dale Uitto_2014 Paper

  1. 1. 1 of 24 Building a Robust Global Asset Management System: People, Partners, and Processes Dale Uitto, CMRP, REC, Global Maintenance, and Reliability Manager, Covidien LP Track 4: Organization and Leadership Abstract The key to building and sustaining a Robust Global Asset Management System is through our People, Partnerships, and robust Processes. The foundation of our system is the Governance Structure where we align, engage, and organize our People. We develop strong Partnerships with our stakeholder and focus our limited resources on critical assets. We develop robust strategic and tactical processes and roadmaps to excellence to guide and measure our journey to best in class performance. The end state is a cultural transformation where the entire facility is accountable and responsible for achieving and sustaining best in class performance. Introduction According to research conducted by Reliabilityweb.com and Uptime Magazine, and confirmed by numerous other sources, over 70% of change efforts and new reliability strategies fail to create a sustained result. There are a number of factors that contribute to the low success rate including: 1. A lack of understanding the elements of reliability as a holistic system and the ways these elements interact and interrelate 2. A lack of appreciation for the roles that culture and leadership play in the delivery of performance 3. A lack of awareness of the nature of the journey from one operating domain or maturity level to another (i.e. the transition from the reactive domain to the planned domain) Excerpt from a paper submitted at the Oct 2013 SMRP Conference. Integrity, By Terrence O’Hanlon, CMRP, CEO, Publisher Reliabilityweb.com/Uptime Magazine. Used with permission May 7, 2014. Building a risk based, Robust Global Asset Management System (Figure #1) is fundamental to achieving and sustaining best in class maintenance and reliability performance.
  2. 2. 2 of 24 Figure #1 Robust Global Asset Management System Structure As we transition from one stable operating domain (Figure #2) to another, we build stability by engaging People, building Partnerships with our stakeholders, and implementing best in class, robust and sustainable Processes. Figure #2 Stable Operating Domains
  3. 3. 3 of 24 Building a Robust Global Asset Management System is not a program. Programs last 3-5 years, cultural transformation last forever. Toyota has been implementing the Toyota Production System (TPS) for over 50 years and still has not “Arrived”. We continuously improve through an organizational structure that demands accountability and sustainability. We target specific critical assets with aggressive deployment goals, objectives, targets, and meet them. Finally, we transform our culture to where best class maintenance and reliability performance is an expectation, not the exception. We have been building our risk based Robust Global Asset Management System for five years and have seen a cultural shift toward an expectation of “Perfection is the Goal… but we will settle for Excellence”. People People (Figure #3) are the hearts and minds of our Robust Global Asset Management System, the implementers and sustainers. Figure #3 People Structure Stakeholders are People Too The key to building a Robust Global Asset Management System is understanding the stakeholder’s needs, desires and then defining them in terms of a Strategic Organizational Plans and Objectives. In many cases, our stakeholders live in a reactive world and need to be enlightened as to best in class maintenance and reliability practices. Our stakeholders come from across the enterprise, both internal, and external:  Stockholder  Corporate Senior Leadership  Corporate and Plant Leadership  Front line supervisors  Production planning  Process and manufacturing engineering  Maintenance and reliability engineering  Operators  Quality
  4. 4. 4 of 24  Internal and external customers  Federal, State and Local Regulators Governance Structure We start by creating a cross-functional Governance Structure (Figure #4) that includes corporate and plant leadership, operations, engineering, and maintenance. If we implement to fast, we risk becoming unable to sustain the system, and it fails. If we implement to slow, we frustrate in the team.  Make the stakeholders part of the solution by engaging them in system development  Implementation plans must be vetted out and approved by all stakeholders  Engage the stakeholders in the system implementation  Execute a quick wins to captivate the team  Build a stability process to hold the gains Figure #4 Cross-functional Governance Structure Capturing the hearts and minds of the People The Governance Structure builds a sustainable best in class maintenance and reliability organization by answers one fundamental question. “What’s in it for me (us)?” To answer this question we implement a sustainable Change Management process (Figure #5):  Case for Change, Why do we need to change  Vision, What is best in class maintenance and reliability  Skills, What are the skills gap we need to address  Incentives, Aligned and personalized goals and opportunities, “What’s in it for me?”  Resources, The right resources in the right places  Action plans, Engage our people in the system  Change, What we want to accomplish
  5. 5. 5 of 24 Figure #5 Sustainable Change Management Process Governance Structure Accountability and Responsibility Next, we define the team’s roles and responsibilities in the form of a RACI document (Figure #6). Figure #6 RACI Definitions Stakeholders Stakeholders are “Consulted”. Their input into the system is critical to its sustainability.  Their contribution is to endorse the system and “Lead by Example”  They are the recipients or customers of our Robust Asset Management System  Stakeholders are “What’s in it for me?” Corporate and Plant Leadership The leadership team is “Accountable” or Champion the system. Leadership makes the final decisions and has ultimate ownership of the system.  Their contribution is to endorse the system and “Lead by Example”  Leadership champion “What’s in it for me?” Frontline Supervisors Frontline supervisors are the forgotten stakeholders. They are “Responsible” for sustaining the process, specifically, Total Productive Maintenance (TPM). Too many times, we fail to recognize their contributions.  Because operators will look to them for encouragement they must have a deep understanding and be fully supported by leadership  Frontline supervisors sustain “What’s in it for me?” Operators Operators are “Responsible” for implementing Total Productive Maintenance (TPM). They look to their supervisors for encouragement, and support.  Operators implement “What’s in it for me?”
  6. 6. 6 of 24 Maintenance Technicians Maintenance technicians are “Responsible” for implementing, supporting, or participating in many of the attributes of the Robust Maintenance System. They look to their supervisors for encouragement, and support.  Maintenance technicians implement “What’s in it for me?” Maintenance Leadership Maintenance leadership is “Accountable” for the execution of the Robust Global Asset Management System and report up progress through the Governance Structure.  Maintenance leadership own the Robust Global Asset Management System  They define the system and “Lead by Influence”  Maintenance leadership executes “What’s in it for me?” Maintenance Engineering Maintenance engineering ensures that assets continue to fulfill their intended function through efficient and effective preventative, predictive, corrective, and emergency maintenance.  Maintenance engineering and their cross-functional teams of maintenance technician, and operators are “Responsible” for the elimination or mitigation of preventable failures utilizing Reliability Centered Maintenance, Root Cause Analysis, and Failure Reporting Analysis and Correctives Action System (FRACAS) and other Robust Asset Management System tools  Maintenance engineering is “Accountable” for maintaining Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA), and Root Cause Analysis data through the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)  The results are a reduction of unplanned downtime, improved performance, and overall asset heath  Maintenance engineering ensures “What’s in it for me?” Reliability Engineering Reliability engineering and their cross functional teams of design and project engineers are “Responsible” for Design for Reliability, utilizing the Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Safety (RAMS) process.  Reliability engineers design “What’s in it for me?” Maintenance Planners and Schedulers Maintenance planners and schedulers are a subset of maintenance engineering, but are extremely critical to the maintenance organization.  Maintenance planners and schedulers are “Responsible” for managing the CMMS and scheduling preventive, predictive and corrective maintenance, and the Implementation of Asset Management Plan
  7. 7. 7 of 24  Planners update the CMMS to reflect the Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis worksheets (FMECA), and lock in the continuous improvement gains The entire Governance Structure is “Responsible” for managing “Maintenance as a Business”. Strategic Organizational Plans and Objectives Through the Strategic Organizational Plans and Objectives the Governance Structure defines, measures, analyses, improves, and controls/validates (DMAIC) the capability and sustainability of the entire Robust Global Asset Management System.  The Executive Champion defines the Goals and Objectives (Policy Deployment) and cascades them through the Governance Structure to the Corporate and Plant Maintenance Champions Asset Management Policy From the Strategic Asset Management Plans and Objectives, the Governance Structure develops and defines the Asset Management Policy.  The team develops the vision, practices, policies, standard operating procedures (SOP), direction and actively models these values inside and outside the organization  The Asset Management Policy can be developed using the plant safety or quality policy as a starting point Strategic Asset Management Plans From the Asset Management Plans and Objectives, the Governance Structure develops and defines the Strategic Asset Management Plans (Asset Rationalization).  Defines the strategic “Change”, we want to accomplish  Defines the critical few assets (asset rationalization), money-makers and money takers we want to focus on Asset Management Objectives Finally, the Governance Structure defines the Asset Management Objectives including responsibilities, accountabilities, performance targets, asset objectives, and tactics. The Asset Management Objectives, incentives the system to achieve the Asset Management Plans  Defines the tactical, “What” we are going to do to move from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain
  8. 8. 8 of 24 Partnerships A strong partnership (Figure #7) with all stakeholders defines the Risk Framework and Risk Tolerance. Figure #7 Partnerships Structure  What risks are the stakeholders willing to except if a specific asset fails to perform as expected  If an asset fails, how will it effect sales/marketing (service levels), and finance  If an environmental control fails, how will it affect the environment or operations  When/how do we engage design and project engineering in Design for Reliability to reduce critical asset failure risk The strong partnership with all stakeholders defines the critical assets and supports the system.  With the support from our stakeholders we move from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain  We work together to breakdown the informational and operational silos  Together we “Manage Maintenance as a Business” We engage the stakeholders through cross functional teams such as Total Productive Maintenance (operations), Design for Reliability (RAMS) or TPM Early Equipment Management (design and project engineering), continuous improvement (operational excellence), and Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS). Asset Management Plans The Asset Management Plans defines the targeted assets and scope to achieve the Asset Management Objectives.  Defines the asset specific strategic and tactical plans to achieve and sustain best in class maintenance, reliability, and financial performance Asset Management Plan can include (in order): 1. Predictive and condition based maintenance 2. Precision maintenance (maintenance prevention) 3. Schedule restoration 4. Scheduled discard 5. Redesign and reliability improvement opportunities
  9. 9. 9 of 24 6. Failure finding (preventative maintenance inspections) 7. Run to failure Based on a risk assessment matrix and criteria (likelihood, consequence, and risk tolerance) (Figure #8):  Drives the asset management decision making process, including business continuity planning and contingency planning (what if)  Based on cause, effect, and likelihood of adverse events (failures) occurring, critical asset failure risk is managed at an acceptable level  Then we can define the asset management plans that are necessary to address the risks and/or opportunities Figure #8 Risk Exposure Implementation of the Asset Management Plans The Implementations of the Asset Management Plan defines the time bound activities, and resources required to achieve the Asset Management Objectives.  Defines the activities, resources and sustainability plans we deploy  Defines the “Who”, “When”, and “How” to move from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain Asset Performance Monitoring, Evaluation, Analysis and Improvements Finally, we validate performance through Asset Performance Monitoring, Evaluation, Analysis, and Improvements.  We validate that our asset management plans are meeting the stakeholders expectation through the Plan Do Check Adjust (PDCA) process Near Certainty E=0.9 0.9 1.8 2.7 3.5 4.5 Risk Level Risk Exposure Highly Likely D=0.7 0.7 1.4 2.1 2.8 3.5 Likely C=0.5 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Unlikely B=0.3 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 Remote A=0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 Minimal Marginal Moderate Critical Catastrophic 1 2 3 4 5 Near Certainty E=0.9 1 Minimal Highly Likely D=0.7 2 Marginal Likely C=0.5 3 Moderate Unlikely B=0.3 4 Critical Remote A=0.1 5 Catastrophic Little or no cost or schedule impact Assessment Description and Recommended Action High probability of failure occurrence and unacceptable consequence. Requires risk mitigation plan High > 2.5 Ensure means of control acceptable and perform risk mitigation. Evaluate benefits of additional risk mitigation Medium 0.9 to 2.4 Events unlikely, NO failures associated with similar equipment No workaround exists, high cost (>10%), unacceptable impact to safety or scheduled Risk Exposure Risk Exposure = (Failure Probability) x (Event Impact) Associated equipment has frequent failures Able to maintenance same approach, low cost (<5%) or schedule impact Similar equipment as experience occasional failure Workaround exist, schedule recoverable, moderate cost (5-7%), potential impact to personnel safety Isolated failure associates with identical equipment Possible workaround with high cost (7-10%), unacceptable impact to safety or schedule Means of control acceptable. Minimal oversight required Low < 0.9 Failure Probability Event Impact Descriptions Failure likely to occur under any operating condition
  10. 10. 10 of 24  The Governance Structure is Accountable for the implementation and sustainability of the entire Robust Global Asset Management System o This team relentlessly drives process standardization and best practices sharing across the enterprise Processes Building Strategic and Tactical Roadmaps to Excellence The Governance Structure is accountable for the development, implementation, and sustainability of best in class maintenance and reliability strategic and tactical roadmaps to excellence. We start by benchmarking best in class process. We can accomplish this by hiring a consultant, attending conferences, or benchmarking other facilities. To create sustainable strategic and tactical best in class processes they must be: 1. Holistic 2. Robust and sustainable 3. Assignable (accountability) 4. Interactive and interrelated 5. Measurable and quantifiable through metrics and key performance indicators 6. Cultural transformational, moves from one stable domain to another 7. Transparent 8. Trainable Strategic Roadmap The Strategic Roadmap (Figure #9) defines the “Change” we want to accomplish  We want to move from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain
  11. 11. 11 of 24 Figure #9 Strategic Roadmap Strategic Plan The Strategic Plan (Figure #10) defines the processes or the “What”, we are going to implement to move us from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain. Figure #10 Strategic Plan Tactical Roadmap Finally, we develop our Tactical Roadmap (Figure #11) or Charter (figure #12), to define the “Who”, “When”, and “How” we are going to move from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain. We align the tactical roadmap with our RACI document to drive accountably and responsibility.
  12. 12. 12 of 24 Figure #11 Tactical Roadmap Figure #12 Tactical Charter Governance Structure Operations Maintenance Engineering Planner and Schedulers Predictive Team MRO Accounting Phase Mode Organization TPM RCM CMMS PM/PdM Inventory Finance FMECA Process Developed (PMO) Certified Planners and Schedulers MRO management process Asset hierarchy in CMMS Asset Criticality Developed II Proactive Aligned Goals, objectives, vision TPM Steps 1 - 5, Cleaning to Inspect FMECA opportunities implemented (PMO) CMMS used for all PM/CM/EM - No WO, No Work Reliability Improvement Teams Inventory in CMMS, No WO, No Parts Managed maintenance spend, labor and materials III Predictive Individual Develop Plans (IDP), skills development TPM 1-6, Autonomous Operations FRACAS used to predict failures, RCA used to eliminate failures All historical data input into CMMS Predictive maintenance implemented Technology Managed Inventory Maintenance spend managed to the Asset Level IV Precision Total Process Reliability owned by process champions TPM 1-7, Continuous Improvement led by process champions Advanced FMECA, FRACAS and RCA integration (RCM) Labor driven standardized KPIs, metrics and reports Precision Maintenance, and Reliability Centered Lubrication Parts Kitting for PM and CM Proactive maintenance budgeting process V Strategic, Tactical Total Process Reliability owned by entire facility TPR, Autonomous management Reliability Centered Design (RAMS/TPM) CMMS drives maintenance as a business Predictive maintenance systems drives maintenance as a business Parts cost reduction and inventory reduction Proactive maintenance budgeting process to the asset level Global Asset Maintenance System Tactical Roadmap I Reactive FMECA opportunities Identified (PMO) FMECA process identifies PdM, Precision, and Lubrication opportunities Corporate and Plant Governance Structure TPM Steps 1- 3, Standards and Training Asset bill of materials Understand Maintenance budgeting process Functional Disciplines Accountability LeanMaintenance Training and Skills Development
  13. 13. 13 of 24 Conclusion We engage our People by implementing and sustaining a Robust Global Asset Management System through the Governance Structure.  The Governance Structure defines who we are as a maintenance organization and how we operate  Aligns the Organizational Plans and Objectives, Asset Management Plans, and Asset management Objectives  Defines “What’s in it for me” and incentives the system We build a strong Partnership with our stakeholder and define our Risk Framework and Risk Tolerance.  We identify the critical few assets, our money-makers and money-takers  With the support of our stakeholders, we move from a reactive to a continuous improvement domain We engage our People and Partners through Strategic and Tactical Processes  Total Productive Maintenance (operations)  Design for Reliability (RAMS), Early Equipment Management (design and project engineering)  Continuous improvement (operational excellence)  Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS)  Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM)  Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA)  Root Cause Analysis (RCA) and Failure Reporting and Corrective Action System (FRACAS) We continuously improve through the Governance Structure, and demand accountability and sustainability. We target specific critical asset with aggressive deployment goals, objectives, and targets and meet them. With the engaged people and a strong partnership, we implemented and sustained best in class process that resulted in increase Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) (Figure #13), reduced unscheduled downtime (Figure #14), and scrap rate (figure #15).
  14. 14. 14 of 24 Figure #13 OEE Figure #14 Unscheduled Downtime Figure #15 Scrap Rate
  15. 15. 15 of 24 Finally, we transform our culture to where best in class performance is an expectation and manage maintenance as a business, “Perfection is the Goal… but we will settle for Excellence”.
  16. 16. 16 of 24 Appendix 1 Process Strategic Plan Definitions From the Strategic Plan (Figure #16) we define each maintenance and reliability process element and the expected performance improvements. This standardizes the process and eliminates the check the box mentality. Figure #16 Strategic Plan Level 1: Governance Structure: Organization and Leadership The Governance Structure is accountable for the development, implementation, and sustainability of best in class maintenance and reliability strategic and tactical processes.  Through Aligned Goals and Objectives we incentivize our People  Build Partnerships to define our critical few assets through asset rationalization, the money-makers and money-takers  Conduct assessments and value stream mapping exercises to measure our gap to best in class performance  Through the catch ball (feedback loop) process, optimize our system continuously Level 2: Computerized Maintenance Management System Utilization, Optimization, and Work Management CMMS Identify all assets, sub-assets, and locations in the CMMS using a standardized hierarchy (ISO 14224).  The CMMS is highly interrelated with Reliability Centered Maintenance, Root Cause Analysis (RCA) and Failure Reporting and Corrective Action System (FRACAS)  Historical data is input, managed and Pareto’d through the CMMS (Labor, MRO, Root Cause, and Downtime)
  17. 17. 17 of 24  The historical data is used to make replace or repair decisions (life cycle cost) and drive asset management continuous improvement Resources and Discipline The maintenance leadership must be certified professionals. Externally recognized certification brings credibility to the team.  Every facility should have Certified Maintenance and Reliability Processional (CMRP), Certified Maintenance and Reliability Technicians (CMRT), Certified Lubrication Engineers and Technicians, Certified Professional PM Planners (UMUG), and Certified Predictive Maintenance technicians Planning and Scheduling PM planners and schedulers are responsible for the preventative, autonomous, predictive, and corrective maintenance.  All activities scheduled at least four weeks in advance Planning and scheduling includes, estimated resources (labor and crafts), MRO parts (kitted) and tools in advance of the maintenance activity Metrics The organization defines the type of behaviors and actions expected before implementing any metrics. Metrics must be link to the Strategic Organizational objectives thereby validating the execution of the strategy and tactical plans, “You are what you measure”. Three key points about metrics: 1) Measure Everything Strategic and Tactical Asset Management Plans must be measurable and quantifiable  There must be a correlation to the strategic (what), tactical (how) and the operational results  Execution must be a priority and reviewed weekly to demonstrate criticality o The speed at which organization executes the strategic objective is proportional to the frequency of the reviews  Metrics are used to identify patterns, monitor system performance, and drive continuous improvement, they are the lagging indicators of the Robust Global Asset Management System  Process implementation is the leading indicator of the Robust Global Asset Management System 2) Assign Everything Use the CMMS system to assign everything and hold the owner accountable  No shared responsibilities, then “nobody” does it  Clear and consisted deliverables, fixed dates, and performance metrics to the lowest manageable level
  18. 18. 18 of 24 3) Transparency Review the plans, goals, objectives, metrics, and implementation progress weekly. Share down to the maintenance technician and operator level. This support “What’s in it for me?” Preventative and Corrective Maintenance All preventative workorders are compliant with NASIC standards, North American Industry Classification System.  All work is planned at least four weeks in advance  All workorders are completed by the person(s) doing the work and historical data is added, labor, craft, MRO, downtime Create all corrective (repairs) workorders as related workorders.  This measures the effectiveness of the preventive maintenance system  All work is planned at least four (4) weeks in advance, where possible  All workorders are completed by the person(s) doing the work and historical data is added, labor, craft, MRO, downtime, root cause  Corrective workorders are reviewed to determined root cause and corrective action MRO Inventory Strategy All MRO parts are issued and managed through the CMMS; stock, non-stock, and order on request.  A workorder is required to obtain any MRO parts  Critical spare parts identified and managed (ABC Analysis)  Parts cost is tracked to the asset or sub-asset level.  MRO spend is review weekly  Asset (MRO) bill of materials are validated for accuracy Management Engagement Operations management must have a balance approach, focusing on both the inputs (maintenance) and outputs (productivity and quality). Focusing on one or two will result in overall poor performance. Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) is a three-legged stool, Quality, Productivity, and Availability.  A traditional manager tries to manage production by manipulating the results o This is like driving while looking through the rearview mirror (output focused)  The lean manager, manage the means (inputs) o The process itself actually leads the results
  19. 19. 19 of 24 Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) Reliability Centered Maintenance is highly interrelated with the CMMS, Workorder Execution and Review, Preventative Maintenance Optimization (PMO), MRO Inventory management, Root Causes Analysis (RCA), Total Productive Maintenance (TPM), Maintenance and Reliability Kaizens, Failure Reporting and Corrective Action System (FRACAS) and Design for Reliability (RAMS). Using a standardized Reliability Centered Maintenance process, review all production, auxiliary, and facilities asset management plans.  Verify compliance with NASIC standards, North American Industry Classification System  Increase the value add tasks, identify and eliminate non-value tasks,  Identify and eliminate or mitigate preventable failures (plan for every failure)  Identify MRO parts (plan for every part), Asset Bill of Material, Critical Spare parts (ABC analysis), Max/Min adjustments, order on request  Identify specialized tools  Identify Predictive maintenance (PdM) opportunities  Identify schedule discard/restoration (FRACAS) opportunities  Identify redesign and reliability engineering opportunities  Defined TPM (evident failures) activities  Define run to failure components (plan for every failure) Total Productive Maintenance Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is defined as focused, self-directed, cross-functional teams working together to improve the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) of assets and processes within their work area.  TPM teams with the support of the front line supervisor, maintenance, and engineering, independently (autonomous) maximize the asset reliability through data collection and continuous improvement that eliminate or manage the seven (7) major losses  TPM teams are engaged in advance asset care, cleaning and housekeeping, lubrication, basic troubleshooting setup and adjustment, changeover (SMED) and basic repairs. The team require minimal support from maintenance and other team members (true autonomous)  Frontline Supervisors supports the team and are “Accountable” for sustainability and team performance  An audit process validates process compliance and sustainability Total Productive Maintenance 7 Steps 1. Develop and train cleaning, lubrication, repairs, troubleshooting, workplace organization, housekeeping and visual factory standards
  20. 20. 20 of 24  Team developed, Rules Before Tools 2. Train and implement autonomous workplace organization and housekeeping practices and standards 3. Advance training for preventative maintenance, inspections and CMMS 4. Implement standardized deep cleaning to inspection 5. Eliminate sources of contamination and inaccessible areas 6. Implement advanced autonomous maintenance (AM), inspections and repairs (basic repairs. trouble shooting, lubrication, setup, adjustments and changeovers) standardized through the CMMS 7. Conducts advance continuous improvement kaizens (Operator Led Reliability, OLR) Workorder Execution Review Conduct weekly preventive, predictive, corrective, and emergency maintenance post mortems with the objective to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of the asset management plans, frequency, and resources (labor).  Identify maintenance and reliability continuous improvement opportunities  Optimize and improve the Asset Management Plans, Plan, Do, Check, Adjust (PDCA)  Preventable failures identified and elimination/mitigation action plans put in place through the Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) and Management of Change (MOC) processes. Level 3: Asset Maintenance and Reliability Engineering Predictive Maintenance Predictive (PdM) maintenance is the integration of technology and tools to measure the health of the assets. Predictive maintenance tools can identify potential failures before they occur (ISO 13372).  Related corrective maintenance workorders, observational workorders written and tracked to rapid completion Reliability Improvement Team (Reliability Kaizens) Through the Robust Global Asset Management System toolset, we identify maintenance and reliability continuous improvement opportunities and quickly complete Kiazen events to eliminate or mitigate the risk of failure. Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Root cause analysis is the immediate reaction to a preventable failure occurrence that meets the trigger (Figure #17).  Using standardized root cause analysis processes, we identify the failures latent root cause and implement elimination/mitigation action plans through the Management of Change (MOC) process
  21. 21. 21 of 24 Figure #17 Root Cause Analysis Reaction Tree Root Cause analysis is highly interrelated with the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), Reliability Centered Maintenance, Preventative Maintenance Optimization, Reliability Kaizens, and Failure Reporting and Corrective Action System (FRACAS).  If we fail to conduct thorough failure root cause analysis, corrective maintenance becomes a simply a parts changing exercises, and preventable failures occur and reoccur (run to failure)  We cannot simply install new components; we must identify and implement the appropriate countermeasure to prevent reoccurrence Precision Maintenance Precision maintenance is the integration of technology and tools to optimize component life, maintenance prevention. Utilize precision maintenance tools where appropriate to eliminate potential failures.  Precision lubrication includes calculated volume, frequency, and lubricant type o Each point has visual factory labels in place to drive error proofing  Precision maintenance includes shaft/pulley/coupling alignment, precision measurement, and precision leveling Root Cause Failure Analysis (Advanced RCM) Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) (Figure #18) is the cultural transformation where we will not accept preventable failures.  Reliability Centered Maintenances is not “set it and forget it”, it is evergreen  When failures occur, we complete a Kiazen to quickly (nimble process) adjust the asset management plans to eliminate the failure (PDCA)  We complete yearly failure reviews to identify and eliminate preventable failures that have occurred
  22. 22. 22 of 24 Figure #18 Reliability Centered Maintenance Process Flow FRACAS (Failure Prediction) FRACAS (Failure Reporting and Corrective Action System) is highly interrelated with the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), Root Cause Analysis, and Reliability Centered Maintenance.  The CMMS records all asset component failures and their root cause. Over time, normal wear failures can be tracked and trended  Once failures are predictable, we move to scheduled replacement, scheduled repair maintenance Level 4: Resource Effectiveness and Efficiency Wrench Time Analysis (Labor Utilization) Wrench time analysis is a Kiazen event focused on measuring and improving maintenance wrench time or labor utilization.  Using the CMMS to measure labor utilization can be deceiving since non-value activities are included  Visual observations and discussion is the best method for measuring wrench time o Take care to avoid the Hawthorn Effect Craft Skill Enhancement The maintenance and reliability organization must map its available resources to the planned activities to determine the skills gaps.  Use the gap analysis to develop Individual Development Plans (IDP) for the affected maintenance team members, hourly and salary  The entire organization must have appropriate awareness of the Robust Global Asset Management System o Tailor the awareness training to the role and relationship to the organization
  23. 23. 23 of 24 Optimized Work Flow (Future State Value Stream Map) Implement the future state value stream processes. Develop a new future state map.  The process results in improved maintenance process flow and reduction in Mean Time to Repair (MTTR) Life Cycle Analysis Understanding the Life Cycle Cost or Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is critical to all phases of an assets life. Acquisition and Creation  We engage our reliability engineers and cross-functional team of design and project engineers in the Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Safety (RAMS) process  The objective is to acquire and install long-term cost effective assets o It may not be the lowest initial cost Utilization and Performance  We engage our process engineers and operators (TPM) to optimize performance of the asset throughout its life cycle Maintenance  We engage our maintenance engineers and operators (TPM) to ensure that assets continue to fulfill their intended function through efficient and effective preventative, predictive, autonomous, corrective, and emergency maintenance Disposal and Replacement  Finally, we dispose of an assets once the cost of operations and maintenance exceeds its replacement asset value (RAV), deprecation value or its useful life is reached At each stage of the process, we make informed asset investment decisions based on data; balancing risk, opportunity, performance, and life cycle cost. Level 5: Reliability Centered Design Engineered Reliability, Design for Reliability (TPM - Early Equipment Management) Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Safety (RAMS) is a symbiotic relationship between the OEM supplier and the facility. Build the process on proven best in class practices, failure data sharing, and trust. Design and install assets for ease of maintenance and reliability. Level 6: Total Process Reliability, Maintenance as a Business, Performance Culture Total Process Reliability is the effective control and governance of physical assets through a managed risk and opportunity maintenance structure resulting in:  Improved financial performance – ROI and cost reduction without sacrificing short or long-term performance
  24. 24. 24 of 24  Informed asset investment decisions – informed investment decisions that balances cost, risk, opportunity, performance and life cycle cost  Managed risk – Reduced financial losses, improved safety, good will and reputation, minimized environmental impact (RCM and Risk Based Maintenance)  Engagement - Aligned and engaged people, and partnerships to support and sustained best in class processes The end state is a cultural transformation where the entire enterprise is accountable and responsible to achieve best in class maintenance and reliability performance. Contact information Dale Uitto, CMRP, REC, Dale.uitto@yahoo.com Andrei Dynnik, CMRP, dag959@yahoo.com Key Words: asset management, autonomous maintenance, culture change, critical equipment, partnerships, process, people, governance structure, TPM, critical assets, culture, definitions, roadmap, tactical, strategic, maintenance strategy, maintenance vision, maintenance management, maintenance process, reliability centered maintenance, risk based maintenance

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