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Winston wolf lambeth personae

A categorisation of the digital capacity of Lambeth residents

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Winston wolf lambeth personae

  1. 1. LAMBETH COUNCIL RESIDENT DIGITAL PROFILES 08.07.2015
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES OF THE CHANNEL SHIFT PROJECT Winston Wolf are working with Lambeth Council to understand how residents think and behave online. We are looking to identify their motivations and remove their barriers to using Lambeth’s digital services. We want to make residents feel comfortable choosing digital because it is the simplest way for them to achieve their goals. This understanding will change behaviour by delivering a combination of the right style and tone of messaging, alongside improvements to our websites. And, by identifying key influencers, we can ensure that as many residents as possible hear the message and choose digital by default.
  3. 3. HIGH LEVEL OBSERVATIONS
  4. 4. VULNERABLE AND LOW INCOME - 22.1% This is the most important group when considering a channel shift because they are the most disconnected. We have to consider traditional outreach channels (leaflets, posters, e-mail, carers, and support groups) to reach, educate and empower this group. One of the specific challenges we face is access. We have to find ways to encourage access even if it is away from the home. A desktop first approach is essential here because this group needs to master desktop before we expect anything else from them. MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME - 32.9%  For the older demographic in this group we have a challenge because they are somewhat disconnected digitally. Some outreach and education would go a long way to effecting a channel shift. The younger demographic are enthusiastic and confident. This means we can push the digital boundaries with them because they will enthusiastically accept a digital challenge. If we ensure that digital channels are intuitive and easy to use we should see success with this group. AFFLUENT PROFESSIONAL - 31.1%  We can assume that this group already has a digital by default mentality. If they are not choosing to interact online it is likely that they do not have rewarding experiences on Lambeth’s current channels. If we focus on ensuring all of Lambeth’s channels are best in class, intuitive and goal completion is easy we should make this group happy. In getting channels ready for this persona group we will accommodate all other persona groups when they do transact online. - There is less of an education challenge here. SKILLED WORKERS - 12.8% We have enough insight into this group to consider them but we don’t have enough information to make focused decisions. We would need to see more concrete evidence before we can confidently recommend content creation or outreach opportunities. Outlined below are the high level observations about the 4 persona groups we have identified though the research we have conducted. Each group signifies a distinct set of digital behaviours: PERSONA GROUPINGS AND OBSERVATIONS Multicultural middle income Affluent professional Skilled workers Vulnerable and low income
  5. 5. APPROACH
  6. 6. WHAT ARE WE TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION? WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? LOCATED COUNCIL SERVICES DIGITAL CONFIDENCE DEVICE PREFERENCE CHANNEL PREFERENCE MEDIA CONSUMPTION INCOME HOUSING AGE EQUALITY We have considered any ethnic or physical ability characteristics that might affect digital behaviours. This ensures a strategy can be fine-tuned. In considering income we can make assumptions about resident’s access to new technologies. If we can locate specific personas we might be able to localise the launch of a strategy most beneficial to that persona. If we know which council services each persona is most likely to use we can assess those digital services with the persona in mind. Understanding a persona’s digital confidence lets us know how much education is needed to help residents understand services. It also shows where we can pilot experimental strategies. If we know what type of housing the persona has we can make assumptions about infrastructure and access to facilities. Age plays a big part in understanding how residents behave digitally. Even within a persona people of different age groups will behave differently. This will show us, by persona, where we should take a mobile, tablet or desktop first approach to digital service design. This will tell us which channels (both digital and other) would be most appropriate to use for effective communication and amplification. This gives us a steer on what tone and style to consider when designing content and communications.
  7. 7. LOCATED COUNCIL SERVICES DIGITAL CONFIDENCE DEVICE PREFERENCE CHANNEL PREFERENCE MEDIA CONSUMPTION INCOME HOUSING AGE EQUALITY •  Ipsos Media CT Tech Tracker •  Ofcom Ethnic Minority Groups and Communication Services 20140926 •  2014 Residents Survey Corporate and Cooperative report FINAL (2) •  Digital Exclusion: Low Incomes Tax Reform Group, April 2012 •  Corporate guidance on Mosaic in Lambeth 2010 •  Lambeth State of the Borough Report 2014 •  UK 2011 Census Report •  Lambeth State of the Borough Report 2014 •  Corporate guidance on Mosaic in Lambeth 2010 •  Corporate guidance on Mosaic in Lambeth 2010 •  Ipsos Media CT Tech Tracker •  Ofcom Ethnic Minority Groups and Communication Services •  Corporate guidance on Mosaic in Lambeth 2010 •  Lambeth State of the Borough Report 2014 •  Age UK Digital Inclusion Review •  Lambeth State of the Borough Report 2014 •  Ipsos Media CT Tech Tracker •  Ipsos Media CT Tech Tracker •  Ipsos Media CT Tech Tracker •  Lambeth values, media consumption and connectedness •  Ofcom News Consumption in the UK Report •  Lambeth values, media consumption and connectedness WHAT INSIGHTS HAVE DRIVEN THESE PERSONAS?
  8. 8. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME
  9. 9. OVERVIEW •  Older residents in this group lack confidence & knowledge to use the internet. There needs to be an emphasis on education, to help them get connected •  Many of the vulnerable & lower income group lack access to the internet. For these residents, we need to advertise the free internet access in Lambeth libraries. •  Vulnerable & lower income residents are more receptive to an casual and informal tone. We should adopt this when communicating with them. •  Smartphone and tablet ownership for this group is patchy. Therefore our priority for vulnerable & lower income residents should be perfecting our channels on desktop. •  There needs to be thought about ESL residents. We should consider translating key content on the site to languages such as Portuguese, Somali, Polish and Arabic. The vulnerable and lower income group are from a variety of different backgrounds - the unemployed, elderly, and long-term disabled. They are the people most in need of the council’s services. This group contains many residents reluctant or unable to use online services. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME DIGITAL CRIB SHEET o  Younger demographic significantly more confident and able than older demographic. o  Older residents lack confidence and concerned about security. o  Older prefer face to face and printed comms. o  Young have mobile phones but majority desktop first. o  Very low tablet ownership. o  Older and unemployed lack access o  Younger residents are active social networkers. o  Informal tone and style comms preferred. o  Little access to new technologies. o  English is a second language for some in this persona. Translation should be considered. 22.1% of Lambeth population © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  10. 10. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME The vulnerable and lower income group are from a variety of different backgrounds, such as the unemployed, elderly, and long-term disabled. They are the people most in need of the council’s services. This group contains many residents reluctant or unable to use online services. INCOME £7,500 - pa HOME •  Social housing. •  Some private rental LOCATED •  Stockwell •  Brixton •  Streatham •  Norwood COUNCIL SERVICES •  Housing benefit •  Childcare DIGITAL CONFIDENCE •  The confidence varies in this group. •  Younger residents do take a digital by default approach. •  There is a serious lack of confidence and knowledge amongst older and disabled residents in particular. •  Security is a concern when using the internet. •  This group is most likely to prefer face to face or phone contact. DEVICE PREFERENCE •  Most younger residents in this group do possess smartphones. •  Tablet ownership is much rarer than for the other personae. •  There is a significant proportion of older people who lack access to the internet. •  The majority of the older residents who do have access do it via desktop. CHANNEL PREFERENCE •  Older resident prefer leaflets and letters. •  Younger residents do show a strong presence on social media, particularly Facebook. MEDIA CONSUMPTION •  The Sun •  ITV has a higher viewership here then the other resident groups Older and disabled demographics need digital education to build confidence. Desktop first approach for this audience as a whole but mobile might appeal to younger residents. Vulnerable & Lower Income residents would be receptive to a more informal tone of voice. Facebook could be a useful channel to reach younger demographic in this group. Older and disabled demographics need digital education to build confidence. Little disposable income for new technologies © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  11. 11. 20-34 •  Smartphone usage is virtually universal amongst this group. Therefore a mobile first approach would be well received. •  Tablet ownership is patchy, with less than half owning one. •  Access to Facebook is over 80%. Therefore social media would be a fruitful communication medium for this age bracket. 35-54 •  Access to the internet amongst this group is above 70%. •  Around half own a smartphone, with tablet ownership being rarer. •  Social media usage is patchy, with only around 40% using Facebook. 55+ •  Access to the internet amongst this age bracket is below 50%. •  The minority own smartphones, and tablet ownership is rare. •  Social media usage is incredibly rare, especially for those aged over 65. •  Surveys showed many older people who have access to the internet simply lack confidence or the knowledge to use the internet. Some were hesitant because of security concerns. •  Those without access need to be made aware of the free computer facilities at Lambeth libraries. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME AGE The vulnerable and lower income group can be split up into three broad groups according to age: Younger demographic might respond to a mobile first unless they pay for top up data in which case mobile transactions might take too long. Access is high but still lower than other personas. For residents without access libraries could be useful. This demographic would benefit from education and encouragement from people in their support network. Facebook could be a useful channel to reach this demographic. Any content created for Facebook should be aimed at the younger demographic in this group only. © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  12. 12. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE •  There are a large number of residents in this category who use English as a second language. •  Online services may need to cater for them through translating content to different languages used in the borough (e.g. Portuguese, Somali, Polish, Arabic). BLACK CARIBBEAN •  Black West Indian residents made up a high proportion of this group. •  Studies suggest that they have a lower internet usage than other ethnic groups (although this is more relevant to Caribbean residents over the age of 35). This could be a case of a need for digital education and publicity. LOW BROADBAND TAKE UP •  Studies suggest that White British people of the lower socio-economic classes tend to have the lowest take up of broadband, followed by Black Caribbean - Whether this is a matter of lack of education or lack of resources needs more research. AVERAGE BROADBAND TAKE UP •  Indian, Other White, & Black African in the lower socio-economic class all showed broadband take up above average. •  These groups seems to have a more progressive approach to digital, and it should be easier to persuade them to take a digital by default approach LONG TERM DISABLED •  The long term disabled (who make up 12% of Lambeth’s total population) were disproportionately likely to lack access to the internet. •  They also reported having less confidence with using the internet. LONG TERM UNEMPLOYED •  2.4% of the Lambeth population is long term unemployed. Again, they are more likely than other groups to lack access to the internet, largely for financial reasons. •  They should made aware of the free internet facilities at all Lambeth libraries. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME EQUALITY The vulnerable and lower income is a highly ethnically diverse group Translation for key content should be considered. Language could be a big barrier to use. We assume young Black Caribbean residents are more digitally sophisticated. Libraries could be a useful resource to combat this barrier. This group will be more likely to use digital channels if they are engaging and easy to use. We should consider reaching out to the support network surrounding these residents. © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  13. 13. ETHEL’S EXPERIENCE •  Ethel has received a letter from the council saying she is in arrears for her council tax. This makes her anxious and worried. Straight away she picks up the phone and calls the number on the letter. •  Ethel gets through to the operator, and asks for advice. •  The operator takes down Ethel’s details, and also asks her for an email address. However, Ethel does not have one. •  The operator is able to access Ethel’s records. They tell Ethel the amount she owes, and why she owes that amount. However, Ethel is confused and does not fully understand council policy. •  The operator tells Ethel that she can log on to the website and see the charges for herself. However, Ethel informs the operator that she has just had eye surgery, and therefore cannot use her computer. •  The operator asks whether there’s anyone who could access the internet for her. However, Ethel lives alone. •  Eventually, Ethel decides to pay her arrears over the phone using her card. BARRIERS TO USE •  Many like Ethel are more comfortable doing business over the phone, rather than on the internet. This is especially true for older residents. •  A large number of older people on lower income lack the most basic knowledge of the internet. Ethel hasn’t even set up an email account. •  Ethel’s problems are compounded by disability - poor eyesight impairs her use of computers. •  A large proportion of older people like Ethel live alone. This exacerbates their digital exclusion. •  Older people still feel more comfortable paying in person or over the phone, rather than online. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME ELDERLY Data suggest few elderly residents access online facilities due to a lack of confidence and distrust. © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  14. 14. LEONARD’S EXPERIENCE •  Leonard has received a letter explaining that he has overdue council tax bills. •  Leonard is hard of hearing and has also broken his hip. He does not have internet access and has been immobile for 2 months. •  Leonard cannot get to Olive Morris House but he does manage to make it to the nearest bank. Here, a helpful teller assists in calling Lambeth Council. •  The Lambeth Operator needs Leonard to answer some data protection questions prior to looking at his council tax records. This is very difficult but Leonard manages to confirm his personal details. •  The bank teller is then able to speak with the Lambeth operator and the three settle on a solution; Leonard will write a cheque and post it to Lambeth Council. •  Leonard’s late payment fine is lifted due to his current disability. BARRIERS TO USE •  Disabled residents like Leonard are much less likely to have access to the internet •  Disability also coincides with a lower confidence in using the internet. •  Disabled people on lower income often have financial restraints preventing them from accessing computers and assistive technology. •  Leonard is immobile and finds it a struggle to get to the library as well as Olive Morris House. •  Leonard is accustomed to using the post and feels there is no need for him to learn how to use the internet. •  People with disabilities such as Leonard often need third party support in order to access the internet. Unfortunately, many disabled residents live alone. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME LONG TERM DISABLED Long term disabled residents lack confidence and to some extent they lack access too. Digital channels could be a huge benefit to this group. © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  15. 15. DAVE’S EXPERIENCE •  Dave is on currently unemployed. He’s been in and out of work for the last few years. •  He receives a letter from the council telling him that they have overpaid his housing benefit over the last two years, and he needs to pay back the deficit. •  Dave is angry, confused and anxious about this, and believes he will struggle to pay it back. •  Dave calls the contact centre. He vents at the operator, explaining that he has very little money saved, and that he is confused as to why he has to payback his housing benefit. •  The operator takes down Dave’s details and reference number. They access his account, and see that since he worked over a certain number of hours in a particular period, his housing benefit was ineligible. •  Dave is angry at this, and doesn’t see the point of the rules. He has a heated discussion with the operator. •  Eventually, Dave calms down and realises he has to pay. He agrees a payment schedule with the operator. He gives his credit card details to pay the first instalment. BARRIERS TO USE •  Many residents on lower income like Dave either lack access to the internet for financial reasons, or lack the knowledge and confidence to use it. •  Dave is angry and confused, and he would rather talk to someone over the phone and vent rather than going through a website. •  Residents often prefer calling the contact centre for more complex queries. It can be difficult to find information from the site. •  Many prefer paying over the phone or in person than online. Some perceive online payment as less secure. VULNERABLE AND LOWER INCOME LONG TERM UNEMPLOYED Long term unemployed residents face a lack of access challenge that we must find a way to overcome. © Jason Cartwright Flickr.com
  16. 16. MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME
  17. 17. OVERVIEW •  In general, younger members of this group show a good confidence in using digital. Furthermore, the Black African demographic as a whole is incredibly proficient and enthusiastic about new technology. Therefore, these residents already practice a digital by default mentality. Furthermore, they would be highly receptive to features such as mobile first, mobile payment and apps. •  Social media may be an effective way of communicating with younger residents. However, for those over the age of 35, social media has much less of a reach. •  Black Caribbean residents over the age of 35 show a below average take up of the internet. We should attempt to communicate with and educate these residents about the benefits of digital. •  Black Caribbean residents were most likely to read The Sun. This suggests we should adopt a more informal tone when communicating with them. •  The over 65s are in particular need of help, information and education. Those with access to the internet often lack the knowledge and confidence to use it effectively •  For those with out Internet access (around half of those aged 65+), there needs to be publicity about free internet access in Lambeth libraries. MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME A high number of second generation Black African & Caribbean residents with a moderately high income, and many are self employed. There is a divide between the more able younger residents, and more hesitant older residents. There are also differences in cultural attitudes to the internet. DIGITAL CRIB SHEET o  High digital confidence levels amongst young demographic. o  Black Caribbean (we assume older) and older demographic lack confidence and are less disengaged. o  Enthusiasm is above national average. o  High smartphone ownership in younger demographic. o  Lower smartphone take up in older demographic. o  Average tablet ownership. o  Mobile first would work with young. o  High Facebook usage up to 45. o  Informal style and approach preferred. o  Young are digital natives. o  High internet access. o  English first language for most. 32.9% of Lambeth population © Robert Cutts Flickr.com
  18. 18. INCOME £35k - £50k pa HOME •  Private renters •  Home owners LOCATED •  Streatham South •  Gipsy Hill •  Knights Hill wards COUNCIL SERVICES •  Council tax •  Childcare •  Business support DIGITAL CONFIDENCE •  Younger members of this group (as digital natives) show a confidence on par with the national average. •  Data shows lower internet usage amongst Black Caribbean residents. It can be assumed that the older make up of that group plays a part in this. •  Black African residents show a confidence and enthusiasm that is well above national average. DEVICE PREFERENCE •  Smartphone ownership is high. •  Apart from older residents over the age of 65 have lower smartphone take up. •  To a lesser extent, there is also some prevalent ownership of Tablets. •  All this suggests that a mobile first approach may be received well by many in this group. CHANNEL PREFERENCE •  Facebook usage is high amongst those aged under 45. •  This quickly evaporates however, and is virtually non- existent for the over 65s. MEDIA CONSUMPTION •  Guardian •  The Times •  The Sun is the most popular paper amongst Black Caribbean residents. MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME A high number of second generation Black African & Caribbean residents with a moderately high income, many are self employed. There is a divide between the more able younger residents, and hesitant older residents. There are differences in cultural attitudes to the internet. This group is connected and enthusiastic. They would be an ideal demographic to trial new digital concepts. Mobile first is a viable option for younger residents but for the good of the whole we should prioritise desktop optimisation. Facebook should be used to reach younger residents but is not useful for accessing older residents in this group. We should adopt a more informal tone when communicating. © Robert Cutts Flickr.com
  19. 19. 20-34 •  Over 80% own smartphones, but around a half own tablets. •  Social media usage is relatively high, with around 80% using Facebook. •  Residents in this age bracket are digital natives, and would be receptive to a digital by default approach. 35-54 •  Access to the internet is near universal for this group (although we see a slightly lower prevalence amongst Black Caribbean). •  Smartphone ownership is over 80% for those aged over 35-44, however this dips to under 50% for those aged 45 – 54. •  Use of Facebook is high for those aged 35-44, however dips significantly for the 45 -54 group. 55+ •  Whilst there is virtually universal access to the internet, only half of the residents in this age bracket own a smartphone. •  Access to Facebook is less than 40%. •  This suggests a lack of confidence or knowledge in using digital. •  Some education may be needed for this group. 65+ •  Over half of this age group has internet access. However, studies suggest that many who do lack the confidence and knowledge to use the internet effectively. •  Overall smartphone ownership is low (around 20%), and use of social media rare. •  Therefore this group is most likely to us desktop if accessing council services online MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME AGE The multicultural middle income persona must be split up into 4 groups according to age. This is because there is a significant difference in how the 65+ demographic behaves digitally: Younger demographic would be served well if digital channels were optimised. To deliver a more rewarding experience. From this age group upwards we start to see a decline in smartphone ownership and social media activity. A little education and encouragement would allow us to affect a positive channel shift change. This demographic will be the hardest to reach and effect in this persona group. © Robert Cutts Flickr.com
  20. 20. MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME EQUALITY As the title suggest, this persona is ethnically diverse. Two of the biggest groups here though are second generation Black Caribbean and Black African. BLACK CARRIBEAN •  The Black Caribbean demographic shows a slightly lower access to the internet, especially amongst those over the age of 35. •  This is exacerbated by the fact that the make up of the Black Caribbean population is older than average. •  We should therefore be prepared to reach out to the Black Caribbean community, to educate them about using online services. BLACK CARIBBEAN DIGITAL NATIVES •  However, it must be noted that younger black Caribbean residents show little difficulty in using online services. •  In fact, data suggests that they are more enthusiastic than average about new technology, and smartphone usage. HIGH DIGITAL ACCEPTANCE •  The Black African demographic shows high enthusiasm for all things digital. •  They are more likely across all ages to be connected, desire the latest technology, and be comfortable using technology. •  Therefore the Black African demographic should be receptive to innovations such as mobile first websites, mobile payment, and apps. ENGLISH AS A FIRST LANGUAGE •  Second generation Black Caribbean and Black African (with the Black Caribbean coming from an English language background anyway) have no language barriers. This group will need education and encouragement to help them increase in confidence Translation not at issue for this persona group. Younger demographic will be closer to the national average than older residents. This is the group you should target to trial new ideas and content. You won’t alienate them easily. © Robert Cutts Flickr.com
  21. 21. SANDRA’S EXPERIENCE •  Sandra has just purchased a car, and she wants to obtain a parking permit for it. •  She books an appointment at Olive Morris House, but is not sure which documents she has to take •  Sandra instinctively calls up the contact centre. After some time on hold, she gets through to an operator, who informs her of which documents she needs. •  Sandra arrives at her appointment at Olive Morris House. After a long wait, she finally sees an observer who issues her with a parking permit. BARRIERS TO USE •  Some members of the multicultural middle income group show a lower internet usage than average. This is especially true for older and African-Caribbean residents. Therefore, their first impulse would not be to go online to use council services. •  Many residents like Sandra simply are not aware that they can apply for parking permits online. •  Even though information about what documents to bring in are available online, Sandra’s first impulse is to call in. MULTICULTURAL MIDDLE INCOME BARRIERS TO USE As the title suggest, this persona is ethnically diverse. Two of the biggest groups here though are second generation Black Caribbean and Black African. © Robert Cutts Flickr.com
  22. 22. AFFLUENT PROFSSIONALS
  23. 23. OVERVIEW •  Affluent professionals are highly likely to use online council services by default. All we need to do to cultivate this is provide efficient and user friendly online channels. •  There may need to be some element of persuasion for the older affluent residents. However, since the majority are already connected, this is a matter of communication and education. •  Affluent Professionals have high smartphone and tablet ownership, and are accustomed to using these for online shopping and banking. We should therefore consider a mobile first approach, and utilise mobile payment. •  We should adopt a professional and friendly tone of voice when communicating to this group. This is in accordance with their preference for broadsheets and high end programming such as Radio 4. •  Social media, especially Twitter, should be utilised for communicating with the younger affluent residents. DIGITAL CRIB SHEET o  High digital confidence levels. o  Black Caribbean, Pakistani, Bengali lag behind the group in terms of digital sophistication. o  Mobile first for younger demographic. o  Most likely to own tablet devices. o  Active social networkers. o  Facebook most used social channel. o  Most likely to have access to new technology. o  Respond to a more serious/formal tone. o  Black African most enthusiastic about to adopting new technology. o  Older demographic more likely to pick up the phone. AFFLUENT PROFESSIONALS Affluent professionals occupy the AB socio-economic grouping. As a a group they are diverse in terms of age, encompassing young high fliers, all the way up to wealthy seniors. Of all the groups, they are largely the most confortable using online services, and the most receptive to change. 31.1% of Lambeth population © Tom Bastin Flickr.com
  24. 24. AFFLUENT PROFESSIONALS Affluent professionals occupy the AB socio-economic grouping. As a a group they are diverse in terms of age, encompassing young high fliers, all the way up to wealthy seniors. Of all the groups, they are largely the most confortable using online services, and the most receptive to change. INCOME £50k + pa HOME •  Affluent professionals are typically home owners. •  Some also rent privately. LOCATED •  Thames-side part of Bishops ward •  Crescent Lane and Elms Crescent in Clapham •  Dulwich border area of Thurlow Park COUNCIL SERVICES •  Landlords •  Registrars Request Copy Certificate •  Council Tax •  Recycling •  Parking services DIGITAL CONFIDENCE •  Very comfortable transacting digitally. •  Younger residents are Digital Natives so are very comfortable transacting online and would take a digital by default approach. Best in class channel design will improve uptake and reduce laziness in this group. DEVICE PREFERENCE •  Majority have smartphones. •  Use smartphones for banking and shopping. •  Two-thirds own a tablet. CHANNEL PREFERENCE •  Given their comfort levels we should communicate with them through email and the council website. •  Prolific social networkers. •  Younger professionals prefer Facebook and Twitter. MEDIA CONSUMPTION ‘High end’ media: •  The Times •  The Guardian and •  BBC Radio 4. A mobile first approach would be sensible for this demographic. Tablet devices should be considered. Facebook and to a lesser extent Twitter would be useful communication channels for this group as a whole. A mobile first approach would be sensible for this demographic. This suggests that we should adopt a more formal tone when communicating with them. Disposable income allows access to new technologies. © Tom Bastin Flickr.com
  25. 25. 20-34 •  These younger professionals are high earning and typically single. •  In terms of living, they are most likely to rent privately. •  They are fundamentally digital natives, with virtually universal smartphone ownership, and majority tablet ownership. Therefore a mobile first approach would be relevant for them. •  In terms of social network, most are on Facebook, and a large proportion are on Twitter. These channels could be an effective medium of communication. 35-54 •  This group is largely made up of couples of families with children. They have high earnings. •  In terms of housing, there is a higher prevalence of home ownership, along with private renting. •  Again, young professional families are very comfortable with technology, with large smartphone ownership, and a significantly high tablet ownership. Therefore, we should aim to make our channels easy to use on tablet devices. •  Facebook is the social channel of choice for young professionals. 55+ •  These wealthy residents often have families, and the majority own their homes (many outright) •  As they are older, they’re online usage is less prolific than the other groups. Whilst the overwhelming majority have internet access and most use smartphones, comparatively few are active on social media. Furthermore, they are more comfortable using the phone to access services. •  Therefore, affluent seniors may need education and help in order to persuade them to adopt a digital by default outlook. AFFLUENT PROFESSIONALS AGE The affluent professional persona can be split up into three broad groups according to age: This is the group most likely to embrace new technologies due to disposable income (fewer large financial commitments). Some education and encouragement should yield results for Lambeth council. Social channels are not going to be effective to reach this demographic. © Tom Bastin Flickr.com
  26. 26. AFFLUENT PROFESSIONALS EQUALITY Data suggests that the majority of the Affluent Professionals persona is White British. AFFLUENT WHITE BRITISH •  Affluent White British have a broadband take up of 80%, a figure which is on par with average for the population. •  Younger affluent White British residents are amongst the most comfortable with digital. AFFLUENT BLACK CARIBBEAN •  Affluent Black Caribbean residents have a slightly lower broadband take up then other ethnic groups (78%) . •  Data suggests Black residents lag behind in terms of digital, although this may be due to the older make up of the group. AFFLUENT BLACK AFRICAN •  Affluent Black Africans have a broadband take up above average (83%) . •  They are in general very enthusiastic in their take up of new technology. AFFLUENT WHITE OTHER •  Affluent White Other have a broadband take up above average (83%) . •  Overall, White Other show a higher take up of new technology such as Tablets than their White British counterparts. AFFLUENT ASIAN •  There are variations in this group. Affluent Indians have a broadband take up and adoption of new technology well above the average. •  However, affluent Pakistanis and Bengalis lag behind in internet usage. AFFLUENT MIXED ETHNICITY •  This group has the highest take up of broadband, and data shows it to be the most enthusiastic for new technology such as smartphones and tablets. Best in class channels should help drive more of this demographic online. The younger demographic could be closer to the national average. With disposable income this group will embrace any digital channel or new technology to transact online. Tablet should be taken into account but a well designed responsive desktop experience should render well on tablet. © Tom Bastin Flickr.com
  27. 27. JOHN’S EXPERIENCE •  John has received a Penalty Charge Notice for his vehicle. He is convinced that he has been unfairly penalised. •  Feeling angry and agitated, he instinctively calls the contact centre and vents at the operator, explaining that he has been unfairly charged. •  The operator takes down John’s details and ticket number. The operator is able to use this to log on to the online system which has CCTV footage of the incident. •  The operator tells John about the nature of the CCTV footage, and encourages John to log on for himself and have a look. •  Whilst staying on the line, John goes on the website the operator has told him about. The operator talks him through how to log on. •  He sees the CCTV footage, and realises he was actually in the wrong. •  John asks if he can pay via phone. The operator tells him he can. John tells the operator his credit card details, and payment is processed. BARRIERS TO USE •  John’s first impulse is not to go online. When people are angry or anxious, they are more likely to want to talk to someone to vent. •  John is not aware that he can see CCTV footage of the incident online. •  Some older affluent professionals like John have a slight lack of confidence and knowledge when using the internet. On top of this, the user experience on the site is not as good as it could be. Therefore John needs to be talked through the logging on process. •  John feels more comfortable paying there and then over the phone. He feels this is a more secure method. AFFLUENT PROFESSIONALS BARRIERS TO USE Data suggests that the majority of the Affluent professionals persona is White British © Tom Bastin Flickr.com
  28. 28. SKILLED WORKERS
  29. 29. OVERVIEW •  Skilled workers aged 55 - 64 mostly have internet access, but few have smartphones. For this group, we have to concentrate on desktop. There also needs to be some education on how to use digital. •  The over 65s often lack access to the internet. They need to be made aware of free internet facilities at Lambeth libraries. For those who do have access, they need education in order to make them confident in using online services. •  Young females skilled workers are highly prolific on social media. Therefore Facebook could be a good way to communicate directly with this group. •  Skilled workers are most likely to read The Sun. We should reflect this when communicating with them by adopting a more informal tone. KEY INSIGHTS o  We are lacking insights for this group o  We would like to suggest more research is carried out to better define this audience. SKILLED WORKERS This is the smallest demographic (12.8%). They work in a range of sectors, and have a multi-ethnic makeup. Younger members of this group tend to have a sound proficiency in digital. As a whole though. Skilled workers (especially older ones) tend to lag behind in terms of adopting digital. 12.8% of Lambeth population © Steve Cadman Flickr.com
  30. 30. INCOME £? HOME •  Private renters •  Social housing LOCATED •  Streatham South •  Gipsy Hill •  Knights Hill wards COUNCIL SERVICES •  Council tax •  Parking services DIGITAL CONFIDENCE •  Younger members of this group tend to have a fairly high confidence in using the internet, and are digital natives. •  Older skilled workers tend to lag behind those of similar ages in other groups in terms of access to the internet, and use of technologies. •  There may need to be a campaign of education here. DEVICE PREFERENCE •  The majority of of Skilled Workers in most age groups own smartphones, albeit a lower proportion than other groups. •  The minority own tablets. •  In fitting with wider patterns, ownership of both fall off dramatically for those aged 55+. CHANNEL PREFERENCE •  Male skilled workers tend to use social media less. •  Female skilled workers use Facebook far more than the overall average. •  Facebook could be a good platform for communicating with younger female residents. MEDIA CONSUMPTION •  The Sun •  This suggests we should adopt a more informal tone when communicating with them. SKILLED WORKERS This is the smallest demographic (12.8%). They work in a range of sectors, and have a multi-ethnic makeup. Younger members of this group tend to have a sound proficiency in digital. As a whole though. Skilled workers (especially older ones) tend to lag behind in terms of adopting digital. © Steve Cadman Flickr.com
  31. 31. 20-34 •  Access to the internet virtually universal in this age group. •  Smartphone ownership is around 80%. This is below the average of comparable ages for the other personas, suggesting new technology has less of a penetration. •  Social media usage is lower than average for men. •  However, females aged 15 – 24 showed the highest usage of any group (91% use Facebook). •  Therefore social media could be a good channel to communicate about services affecting young female skilled workers. 35-54 •  Internet access is high, at around 90%. •  Smartphone ownership is more patchy, with just over half of those aged 45 – 54 owning a smartphone. •  Less than half of 35 – 54s own tablets. •  Therefore this group will most likely access council services via desktop. 55+ •  The majority in this age group do have internet access (over 80%). It seems clear that their confidence use of new technology is limited. •  The minority own smartphones, and even fewer tablets. •  Use of social networks is also rare. •  This group may need education about using digital. Furthermore, we should concentrate on a desktop approach for them. 65+ •  Well under half of over 65s have internet access, and only small minority own smartphone or tablets. •  Social media usage is also extremely rare. •  Studies suggest that this age group lacks confidence and knowledge with digital. We should concentrate on educating those who do have internet access. •  For the majority who lack internet access, we need to make them aware of free internet access at Lambeth libraries. SKILLED WORKERS AGE The skilled worker persona must be split up into 4 groups according to age. This is because there is a significant difference in how the 65+ demographic behaves digitally: © Steve Cadman Flickr.com
  32. 32. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS
  33. 33. Users with reduced sight or hearing often struggle to consume the content on websites. This is a particular problem for the elderly, who are more likely to suffer from such disabilities. There are some basic guidelines that can make content more accessible for them: •  Use easy to read fonts •  Use increased line spacing •  Ensure sufficient contrast between fore- and background •  Allow increasable clickable area of targets •  Provide transcriptions and captions for audio content for the deaf Screen readers are a type of assistive technology software. They can read out text, labels and descriptions from a site. On top of this, many are able to bring out transcriptions for videos and audio. There are some key guidelines to follow to make sure sites work well with this software: •  Avoid tables (the software can only read from left to right and is not able to understand the table) •  Add useful descriptive text to links •  Include text description for images (alt tags) •  Place relevant links under an image DIGITAL FOR VISUALLY IMPARED AND DEAF RESIDENTS
  34. 34. It is imperative content takes into account the visual stress experienced by some. Here are some best practice guidelines for designing websites and content for residents with Dyslexia: DIGITAL FOR DYSLEXIC RESIDENTS •  Font face & size needs to be deeply considered to facilitate ease of reading. Refrain from using italics or underlining, instead use bold to emphasize text. •  Plain and evenly spaced sans serif fonts are preferable. Serif fonts pose a problem as the decorative flair at the end of the letter stroke can obscure the letter shape making it harder to distinguish what the words are. •  Avoid the use of justified text, large uneven spaces between words and increased white space will make it difficult for someone with dyslexia to follow sentences without distraction and a consequence may cause them to lose their place. •  Where possible use visuals to increase comprehension and break apart text. •  UX minimalism – reduce clutter and noise opting for clean, straight- forward layouts enabling the user to focus on a specific task. •  Navigation must be extremely easy to use. Help the user to orient themselves and visually navigate pages with a clear content hierarchy. •  Simplicity is key, avoid the use of complex language. Concise bullet points or numbered lists are preferable over continuous paragraphs.
  35. 35. Semi literate users struggle to consume text-heavy websites. This problem manifests across age groups and needs to be addressed on the site interface. There are some basic guidelines that can make content more accessible for semi literate residents: DIGITAL FOR SEMI LITERATE RESIDENTS •  Avoid using too much text and display information graphically where possible. •  Semi-abstract cartoons and photo realistic graphics assist semi literate residents with interpreting information. •  Differences in culture and religion cause different interpretations of graphical elements and may lead to misunderstanding. Be aware of this when using images to portray messages. •  Audio capabilities assist semi literate residents immensely when interpreting website information. Consider including this feature where possible. •  Include an onscreen help feature that users can resort to, should they feel the need.

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