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By Anthony P. Carnevale, Martin Van Der Werf,
Michael C. Quinn, Jeff Strohl, and Dimitri Repnikov
November 13, 2018
Overview
•  The US public higher education system is racially
stratified.
•  Whites are given a first-class education in w...
Selective vs. open-access colleges
in the United States
•  Our tax-funded public colleges enroll more than 75 percent of c...
Public colleges are racially separate
and unequal
•  Whites have 64 percent of
the seats in selective public
colleges even...
•  The graduation rate at
selective colleges is 85
percent, while the graduation
rate at open-access colleges
is just 51 p...
•  SAT/ACT scores often reflect
the quality of schooling and
the level of parental education
of the test-taker, factors th...
Selective public colleges have more
resources than open-access public
colleges
•  The gap in instructional and
academic su...
Selective public colleges in 15 states get at least twice as
much public funding as open-access public colleges
•  In Cali...
•  Latinos are proportionately
represented at selective
public colleges only in
Florida.
•  Blacks are
underrepresented at...
Conclusion
•  Our separate and unequal public higher
education system exacerbates gaps in
educational attainment between W...
11
cew.georgetown.edu/SUStates
More Information
cew@georgetown.edu
Facebook.com/
GeorgetownCEW
linkedin.com/company/
georg...
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Our Separate & Unequal Public Colleges: How Public Colleges Reinforce White Racial Privilege and Marginalize Black and Latino Students

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Our Separate & Unequal Public Colleges: How Public Colleges Reinforce White Racial Privilege and Marginalize Black and Latino Students, shows that the elite public four-year colleges do not represent the populations they are supposed to serve.

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Our Separate & Unequal Public Colleges: How Public Colleges Reinforce White Racial Privilege and Marginalize Black and Latino Students

  1. 1. By Anthony P. Carnevale, Martin Van Der Werf, Michael C. Quinn, Jeff Strohl, and Dimitri Repnikov November 13, 2018
  2. 2. Overview •  The US public higher education system is racially stratified. •  Whites are given a first-class education in well-funded selective public colleges. •  Blacks and Latinos are funneled into overcrowded, underfunded open-access public colleges. •  Graduation rates between selective and open-access colleges differ widely. •  Standardized test scores are poor predictors of graduation rates. •  Selective public colleges receive more funding than open- access public colleges. •  Almost every state has unequal proportions of Blacks and Latinos enrolled in selective public colleges compared to their share of the college-age population. 2
  3. 3. Selective vs. open-access colleges in the United States •  Our tax-funded public colleges enroll more than 75 percent of college students. •  Selective public colleges comprise 170 selective colleges whose students have median SAT scores ranging between 1150 and 1600. •  Open-access public colleges comprise 1,100 two- and four-year colleges that admit students who have evidence of high school graduation or its equivalent. 3 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  4. 4. Public colleges are racially separate and unequal •  Whites have 64 percent of the seats in selective public colleges even though they make up only 54 percent of the college-age population. •  Blacks are 15 percent of the college-age population, but only 7 percent of freshmen at selective public colleges. •  Latinos are 21 percent of the college-age population, but only 12 percent of freshmen at selective public colleges. 4Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce44 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  5. 5. •  The graduation rate at selective colleges is 85 percent, while the graduation rate at open-access colleges is just 51 percent. •  Black and Latino students graduate from selective colleges at almost the same rate (81%) as White students (86%). 5 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce Graduation rates differ substantially between selective public colleges and open-access public colleges
  6. 6. •  SAT/ACT scores often reflect the quality of schooling and the level of parental education of the test-taker, factors that overwhelmingly favor Whites. •  A student who scores just above average on the SAT (1000-1099) is about as likely to graduate as a student who scores in the top quartile (1200 and above). •  Only 19 percent of high- scoring Blacks and Latinos enroll in selective colleges. 6 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce Standardized test scores are not strong predictors of college graduation
  7. 7. Selective public colleges have more resources than open-access public colleges •  The gap in instructional and academic support spending per student between open-access and selective public colleges has grown from $8,800 in 2005 to $10,600 in 2015. •  Open-access colleges have only 2.7 full-time faculty members per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) students. •  Selective colleges, meanwhile, have 6.8 full-time faculty members per 100 FTE students. 7Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce7 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  8. 8. Selective public colleges in 15 states get at least twice as much public funding as open-access public colleges •  In California, selective public colleges spend five times as much as open-access public colleges on instructional and academic support per student. •  Selective public colleges increased spending the most in Illinois and Connecticut between 2005 and 2015. •  Open-access public colleges in Wyoming, Wisconsin, and Alaska receive far more state and local government funding per FTE student than any other state. 8Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce8 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  9. 9. •  Latinos are proportionately represented at selective public colleges only in Florida. •  Blacks are underrepresented at selective public colleges in every state with a sizable Black population, although Kentucky comes close to proportional representation. 9 Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce Latinos have been gaining access to selective public colleges in almost every state, but Black representation in selective public colleges has declined
  10. 10. Conclusion •  Our separate and unequal public higher education system exacerbates gaps in educational attainment between Whites and Blacks and Latinos. •  Enrollment at selective public colleges should reflect a cross-section of each state’s college-age population. •  Colleges should end the overreliance on standardized test scores to decide who gets into selective public colleges. •  Policymakers should allocate more state and federal spending to education at open-access public colleges where the financial needs are greatest. 10
  11. 11. 11 cew.georgetown.edu/SUStates More Information cew@georgetown.edu Facebook.com/ GeorgetownCEW linkedin.com/company/ georgetowncew @GeorgetownCEW Slideshare.net/ CEWGeorgetown YouTube.com/ GeorgetownCEW

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