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Module 3.pdf

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Module 3.pdf

  1. 1. APPLICATION OF GOOD CITIZENSHIP IN DAILY LIFE OVERVIEW  In the previous module, you learned the different aspects of self to fully understand the behaviors of individuals, then you learned also how to express your commitment in upholding the Filipino core values by supporting NSTP activities and in performing your roles as individuals.  In our next lesson, we will tackle Good Citizenship on how we apply in our daily life as a Filipino, it will specifically discuss Factors Determining Citizenship and Responsibilities of a Filipino Citizen.
  2. 2. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES ➢ After completing the study of this module, you should be able to: ➢ Understand what Citizenship is all about. ➢ Determine the different factors determining citizenship ➢ Describe how you fulfill your responsibilities as a Filipino citizen.
  3. 3. Introduction A good Filipino citizen is one who plays an active and intelligent role as a member of the community. He/she is one who fulfills his duties and obligations to the government and society. He/she possesses the traits of respectfulness, courtesy and consideration for parents and elders and for others. He/she observes punctuality, promptness, and good moral conduct.
  4. 4. You can become good citizens by living in accordance with the good citizenship values we can derive from the preamble of the 1987 Philippine constitution: “We the sovereign Filipino people, imploring the aid of Almighty God in order to build a just humane society and establish a Government that shall embody our ideals and aspirations, promote the common good conserve and develop our patrimony, and secure to ourselves and our posterity, the blessings of independence and democracy under the rule of law and a regime of truth, justice, freedom, love, equality and peace, do ordain and promulgate this constitution”.
  5. 5. 3.1 What is Citizenship? Citizenship is personal and more or less permanent membership in a political community. It denotes possession within that particular political community of full civil and political rights subject to special disqualifications such as minority. This status confers upon the individual certain prerogatives which may be denied the alien. Thus, the citizen enjoys certain exclusive rights, such as the rights to vote, to run for public office, to exploit natural resources, to operate public utilities, to administer educational institutions, and to manage the mass media. Commonly, it imposes the duty of allegiance to the political community.
  6. 6. 3.2 Factors Determining Citizenship. Modern law recognizes these modes of determining citizenship 1. Parents are citizens  JUS SANGUINIS meaning (right of blood) – that citizenship is granted based on ancestry or ethnicity, and is related to the concept of a nation state common in Europe. ➢ If a person has both parents who are citizens of a given state, the person is normally a citizen of that state as well. ➢ A person could be born outside of the physical territory of a country, but if his or her parents are citizens, then the child is a citizen as well. States normally limit the right to citizenship by descent to a certain number of generations born outside the state. This form of citizenship is common in civil law countries.
  7. 7. 2. Born within the Philippines  JUS SOLI (right of soil) which is the legal principle that a person’s nationality at birth is determined by the place of birth. Example, the territory of a given state. ➢ A person becomes a citizen of a state where he is born irrespective of the citizenship of the parents. ➢ A child born in the Philippines of foreign parents is a Filipino. - One born in the Philippines of American parents is also a Filipino Citizen. (Section 3. Philippine citizenship may be lost or reacquired in the manner provided by law)
  8. 8. 3. Marriage to a citizen Citizenship can also be obtained by marrying a citizen which is termed Jure Matrimonii. ➢Marriage of a Filipino Citizen (whether male or female) to an alien spouse does not make Filipino an alien nor the husband or wife, an alien, a Filipino. ➢The Filipino citizenship is retained unless by the act or omission of the Filipino, renouncing his or her citizenship.
  9. 9. 4. Naturalization ➢States normally grant citizenship to people who have immigrated to that state and have resided there for the given number of years. Sometimes aspiring citizen may have to pass a test, swear allegiance to their new state and renounce their prior citizenship. ➢The present Naturalization law of the Philippines is Commonwealth Act No. 473.
  10. 10. (Commonwealth Act No. 473 An act to provide for the acquisition of Philippine citizenship by naturalization, and to repeal acts numbered twenty-nine hundreds and twenty-seven and thirty-four hundred and forty-eight.) - The renunciation if the former nationality and the fact of entrance to similar relationship towards a new body politic. (Section 4. Citizens of the Philippines who marry aliens shall retain their citizenship, unless by their act or omission they are deemed, under the law, to have renounced it.)
  11. 11. Under Section 2 of the Revised Naturalization Law the applicant must possess the following qualifications for Philippine Naturalization. 1. He must not be less than twenty-one years of age on the day of the hearing of the petition; 2. He must have resided in the Philippines for a continuous period of not less than ten years; 3. He must be of good moral character and believes in the principles underlying the Philippine Constitution, and must have conducted himself in a proper and irreproachable manner during the entire period of his residence in the Philippines in his relation with the constituted government as well as with the community in which he is living;
  12. 12. 4. He must own real estate in the Philippines worth not less than five thousand pesos, Philippine currency, or must have some known lucrative trade, profession, or lawful occupation; 5. He must be able to speak or write English or Spanish or anyone of the principal languages; UNDER SECTION 2 OF THE REVISED NATURALIZATION LAW THE APPLICANT MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING QUALIFICATIONS FOR PHILIPPINE NATURALIZATION.
  13. 13. 6. He must have enrolled his minor children of school age in any of the public or private schools recognized by the Bureau of Public Schools of the Philippines where Philippine history, government and civics are taught or prescribed as part of the school curriculum, during the entire period of the residence in the Philippines required of him prior to the hearing of the petition for naturalization as Philippine citizen. UNDER SECTION 2 OF THE REVISED NATURALIZATION LAW THE APPLICANT MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING QUALIFICATIONS FOR PHILIPPINE NATURALIZATION.
  14. 14. Under Section of 4 of the Revised Naturalization Law, the following persons cannot qualify for Philippine citizenship of the Revised Naturalization Law 1. Persons opposed to organized government or affiliated with any association or group of persons who uphold and teach doctrines opposing all organized governments; 2. Persons defending or teaching the necessity or propriety of violence, personal assault, or assassination for the success and predominance of their ideas;
  15. 15. Under Section of 4 of the Revised Naturalization Law, the following persons cannot qualify for Philippine citizenship of the Revised Naturalization Law 3. Polygamists or believers in the practice of polygamy; 4. Persons convicted of crimes involving moral turpitude; 5. Persons suffering from mental alienation or incurable contagious diseases;
  16. 16. Under Section of 4 of the Revised Naturalization Law, the following persons cannot qualify for Philippine citizenship of the Revised Naturalization Law 6. Persons who during the period of their stay in the Philippines, have not mingled socially with the Filipinos, or who have not evinced a sincere desire to learn and embrace the customs, traditions, and ideals of the Filipinos; 7. Citizens or subjects of nations with whom the Philippines is at war; and 8. Citizens or subjects of a foreign country other than the United States, whose laws do not grant Filipinos the right to become naturalized citizens or subject thereof.
  17. 17. Under Section of 4 of the Revised Naturalization Law, the following persons cannot qualify for Philippine citizenship of the Revised Naturalization Law 9. Persons who during the period of their stay in the Philippines, have not mingled socially with the Filipinos, or who have not evinced a sincere desire to learn and embrace the customs, traditions, and ideals of the Filipinos; 10. Citizens or subjects of nations with whom the Philippines is at war; and 11. Citizens or subjects of a foreign country other than the United States, whose laws do not grant Filipinos the right to become naturalized citizens or subject thereof.
  18. 18. 3.3 Citizens of the Philippines Under the present Constitution, the following are considered citizens of the Philippines: a. Those who are citizens of the Philippines at the time of the adoption of this Constitution. b. Those whose fathers or mothers are citizens of the Philippines. c. Those born before January 17, 1973 of Filipino mothers, who elect Philippine citizenship upon attaining the age of majority. d. Those who are naturalized in accordance with law.
  19. 19. 3.3 Citizens of the Philippines Hence, based on Article IV, Section 1 (2) of our 1987 Constitution, the basic rule on citizenship in the Philippines, irrespective of the place of birth, is that a person born of either a Filipino father or a Filipino mother shall be considered a Philippine citizen following the jus sanguinis rule. Unlike the rule in American law, however, where the Congress cannot strip a person of his citizenship absent his voluntary renunciation, our Constitution expressly provides that 'Philippine citizenship may be lost or reacquired in the manner provided by law. “Thus, our Congress can provide for specific grounds that could result in loss of one's Philippine citizenship such as those provided under Commonwealth Act No. 63.
  20. 20. 3.3 Citizens of the Philippines Alexander L. Lacson is a Filipino bestselling author of patriotic books, a poet, lawyer, businessman, civil society leader, and NGO leader. He is best known as the bestselling author of the book "12 Little Things Every Filipino Can Do to Help Our Country. After Lacson and his wife chose to stay in the Philippines instead of moving abroad, they decided to promote the idea that conditions in the Philippines could be improved if individual Filipinos stayed in their homeland and took action. Lacson reasoned: "The answer is in us as a people; that hope is in us as a people. When he published a 108-page book titled 12 Little Things Every Filipino Can Do to Help Our Country, it struck a nerve among many Filipinos.
  21. 21. The 12 "little things" are: 1. Follow traffic rules. Follow the law. Whenever we are on the road obeying traffic rules and using common sense are essential. Traffic rules are in place to help protect you and others while operating a vehicle on the road. Be mindful of the following; Observe speed limit, be mindful of traffic signs and signals, signal your intentions and pass with care and only where allowed.
  22. 22. The 12 "little things" are: 2. Whenever you buy or pay for anything, always ask for an official receipt. It is very important to ask for an official receipt for it will help you separate chargeable and non-chargeable income and identify your actual deductions if there is any. It can also help you to keep track of deductible expenses most especially in business, keeping receipts of all your transactions will help you claim all of your possible deductions.
  23. 23. The 12 "little things" are: 3. Don’t buy smuggled goods. Buy local. Buy Filipino.  A good Filipino citizen we are obliged to support our own products as for buying local products means that you support yourself too, when you spend your money on a locally-owned business instead of a multinational brand, your money goes to purchasing other service providers, farms, and businesses which strengthens the country’s economic base. (….)  As a consumer, you’ll have access to wider options when you shop from locally owned businesses, who are more in tune with what the community needs and wants at a fair price. International companies develop products based on sales targets and profits more importantly, without keeping the diversity of the community in mind. This is why more Filipino businesses are creating unique, thoughtful products to cater to a smaller niche but with a bigger impact. Be wiser and think about the next time you’re making a decision about where to spend your money. Going local is always the better choice.
  24. 24. The 12 "little things" are: 4. When you talk to others, especially foreigners, speak positively about us and our country.  Essentially, we Filipinos can be proud of our humanity. We are a highly- relational people, proficient in emotionally and socially connecting with others. Our innate humanity is very much apparent in the caring ways we interact with those close to us including others outside our kin circle. In fact, this trait is one of the distinct assets of millions of Filipino doctors, nurses, care givers, and nannies who work abroad. Aside from which, we Filipinos are creative though being creative is not an exclusive trait possessed only by Filipinos, what makes ours distinct is the artistry, expressiveness, spontaneity, and humor that altogether define Filipino creativity. (….)
  25. 25. The 12 "little things" are: 5. Respect your traffic officer, policeman, and soldier. There is nothing like the power of respect. It makes a person proud. It makes one feel honorable. At the same time, courtesy to others is good manners. It is class and elegance and kindness. It is seeing the value and dignity in the other man. It is, in fact, a mark of a most profound education.
  26. 26. The 12 "little things" are: 6. Do not litter. Dispose of your garbage properly. Segregate. Recycle. Conserve.  Do not litter. Dispose your garbage properly. Segregate. Recycle. Conserve. As Louis Armstrong says in his song: "I see trees of green, red roses, too, I see them bloom for me and you and I think to myself, what a wonderful world."
  27. 27. The 12 "little things" are: 7. Support your church. ➢ You can see your church become more fully effective by becoming part of the solution. Be the change you want to see. Here are five ways you can help to support your church.
  28. 28. The 12 "little things" are: Support your church. ➢ Be Committed. The best way to make your church better is to be there consistently and faithfully. ➢ Be on Time. Get up early on Sunday morning and be at church on time. If we were as punctual at work as we were at church, I wonder how long many of us would keep our jobs. If you’re supposed to serve in a particular area, make a special effort to not only be on time, but be early. Give the attention to that ministry that you would to something you value such as your job or your favorite hobby.
  29. 29. The 12 "little things" are: Support your church. ➢ Be Positive. Come to church with a smile. I’m not saying be plastic or inauthentic. If you’re suffering through a crisis, the church should be the first place to cry. Come ready to love and forgive and hug and forbear. Come to church ready to forgive small and big slights. Also, be pro-church. ➢ Be Prepared You can prepare with prayer. Before you walk in the doors, you might pray for your pastor and the staff. Pray for the Spirit’s presence to be strong in the service and in the preaching. Bathe the entire church body in prayer. Think of some of the neediest members in your church and commit their needs to prayer.
  30. 30. The 12 "little things" are: 8. During elections, do your solemn duty. During elections, do your solemn duty. -- Honesty, more than a masteral or doctorate degree, is what gives credibility. And credibility is essential because it is a leader's link to the people. It is what makes the people look to one direction, follow a common vision, and perform a uniform act. In short, credibility is what makes people follow the leader.
  31. 31. The 12 "little things" are: 9. Pay your employees well. No exercise is better for the human heart than to reach down and lift someone else up. This truly defines a successful life. For success is the sum, not of our earthly possessions, but of how many times we have shown love and kindness to others.
  32. 32. The 12 "little things" are: 10. Pay your taxes.  In 2003, P83 billion was collected from individual income taxes. But 91 percent of this amount came from salaried workers from the government and private sector, people who had no choice since their income taxes were withheld mandatorily. Only P7 billion of the P83 billion came from businessmen and professionals like doctors, lawyers, accountants and architects, among others.
  33. 33. The 12 "little things" are: 11. Adopt a scholar or a poor child. You can make a difference in the future of our country by making a difference in the world of children.
  34. 34. The 12 "little things" are: 12. Be a good parent. Teach your kids to follow the law and love our country. Today's children will someday rule and lead this world. But whether they will be bad rulers or good leaders will depend largely on how we raise them today. Our future is in the hearts and minds of our children.

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