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Babelfish Articles August-December 2014 13-1-15

Babelfish Articles: Articles that I found interesting and thought it good to share. Items in yellow - priority reads. Ctrl-Click on article in Summary and it will take you to placemark.

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Babelfish Articles August-December 2014 13-1-15

  1. 1. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 1 Articles August- December 2014 Brian Crotty Babelfish.Brazil@gmail.com
  2. 2. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 2 Summary Depth is more effective than reach ....................................... 11 Creating engagement: Depth over reach .................................... 11 2 Powerful Trends for the TV Buyer to Consider in 2015.................... 17 Data Becomes CES Rising Star For Advertisers.............................. 18 5 Agency Leaders on Which Industry Changes Keep Them Up at Night .......... 18 Why Our Brains Don't Respond To Our Attempts At Habit Change .............. 20 Dual-screening ad tactics evolve ......................................... 21 Optimum TV ad length varies .............................................. 22 Second Screening During TV Time—It's Not What You Think................... 23 5 Things You Need to Know About Data Management Platforms................. 24 Next-Generation Product Recommendations: The Balance Between Data and Discovery................................................................ 25 Three criteria aid ad effectiveness ...................................... 33 Amex CMO Says Agencies Must Focus More On 'The Value Of Interpretation' ... 34 How Walmart Is Bridging Retail’s Digital-Physical Divide.................. 35 The Case for How-to Video Content Marketing .............................. 38 10 Things Not to Do as a Digital Analyst ................................. 40 Walmart's New System Will Buy Media for Retailer -- And Its Suppliers ..... 42 To Trigger or Target; That Is the Question ............................... 45 Beacons Score: Results Start to Come In .................................. 46 Brightroll’s New Study With Nielsen Reveals How Mobile Video Translates To TV ......................................................................... 47 Data Actually Becomes a Form of Currency in the TV Upfronts............... 48 WPP Buys a Stake in Rentrak to Sync Up TV Data with Kantar................ 49 The Future of Media Is About Business Outcomes -- Not Media Outputs ....... 50 7 Advertising Trends That Show You Exactly Where This Industry Is Headed .. 50 Predictive Personalization: How Far Is Too Far?........................... 52 7 Tips for Using Data to Maximize Content ................................ 53 The Problem With Wearable Technology, According To "Blade Runner" Designer Syd Mead................................................................. 54 Marketing is CRM at scale ................................................ 59 Video Programmatic Advertising: More Risky Than You Think?................ 60 Programmatic role will expand in 2015 .................................... 61 Will I Hit My Year-End Numbers? A Brand-Performance Forecasting Model: .... 62 How to manage budgets from day one ....................................... 74 Help Us, Princess Leia: Inside The Quest To Make Holograms Mainstream ..... 75 PSFK Recaps CES 2015 ..................................................... 81 Can Your Company Deliver What Marketing Promises?......................... 83 Wake-Up Call: Your Video Consumers Have Left The Building, Why Haven’t You? 85 10 consumer trends for 2015 .............................................. 86 Tablet Users to Surpass 1 Billion Worldwide in 2015....................... 89 Viewability is 'table stakes' ............................................ 92
  3. 3. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 3 UK Key Trends for 2015: Consumer-Focused Technologies Shift Up a Gear ..... 92 Brazil Ranks No. 10 for Retail Ecommerce Sales Worldwide................. 104 5 big trends in Australian business in 2015 ............................. 105 15 Digital Marketing Trends To Keep In Mind For 2015..................... 107 Messaging Apps Will Be Bigger Than Social Networks In 2015............... 110 Top technology to watch in 2015, from hoverboards to wearable tech, and the gadgets we really want .................................................. 111 14 Checklists, Scorecards, and Worksheets to Set Up Content Marketing Success ........................................................................ 120 Media Trends 2015: Precision TV, Everyday Memes, And Media With 'Pace And Purpose'................................................................ 122 The Next Big Thing(s) For Online Advertising: Predictions for 2015 ....... 123 Feature Phones Important for Mobile Web Use in Latin America ............. 125 The value of efficient reach: maximizing campaign audiences.............. 126 IAB Shares Their 2015 Predictions: “2015 Will Be A Big Year For Mobile” .. 127 2015 Television Advertising Predictions -- Or Guarantees?................ 129 SVOD threat 'exaggerated' ............................................... 130 Unilever champions 'I Function' ......................................... 131 TRENDS 2015 for the Ad, Media & Entertainment industries................. 132 GM will beam donut discounts directly to drivers......................... 134 Video Advertising: How Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and Snapchat are Changing the Rules...................................................... 135 Video Advertising in Social Media: 11 Insights to Help You Make the Most of It...................................................................... 151 WPP's Latest Latin America Shopping Spree ............................... 153 Brands Try out Gamification ............................................. 153 Google Releases Tool Predicting Path To Purchase......................... 154 The New Happy Meal: Beacons Drive Sales at McDonald's.................... 155 The Quiet Growth of Mobile Payments in the World of QSR.................. 156 eBay: Cross-Device Targeting Better for Customer Retention than Prospecting ........................................................................ 157 What Factors Affect Mobile CPM Prices? .................................. 158 An interview with: glenn fishback Head of Global Display eBay Enterprise . 160 2015 US Ad Forecast: Internet’s OK, Other Media Not So Much.............. 161 All In All, Ad Tech Is Just Another Brick In The Wall.................... 166 Agencies at risk from media owners ...................................... 167 Streaming disrupts linear TV ............................................ 168 Amazon will allow buyers to haggle with third-party sellers.............. 169 Multi-screen video increases reach ...................................... 169 The Difference Between Like and Love .................................... 170 Key Trend for 2015: The Customer Journey Moves to Center Stage ........... 171 Samsung’s Eye-Tracking Mouse Opens Computing to More Users With Disabilities ........................................................................ 173 Facebook at Work: Zuckerberg and co to create LinkedIn rival ............. 174 Online motivations vary widely .......................................... 175
  4. 4. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 4 Neuroscience backs tablet ads ........................................... 176 55% Of Consumers Say Native Advertising Is a Reliable & Credible Source of Information............................................................. 177 5 Ways to be Indispensable at Work ...................................... 181 Five Ways Job-Seekers Blow It ........................................... 182 Marissa Mired in Controversy ............................................ 185 Facebook Changes Stripes Once Again, Organic Brand Posts Now Endangered .. 185 Proving ROI In 48 Hours: How Forbes + Dell Pioneered Modern Brand Journalism ........................................................................ 186 Strategic Thinking: Why Stargazing Matters in Business................... 189 Q&A: Dennis Crowley on how foursquare is evolving for brands ............. 190 How Programmatic Can Help Creativity Flourish............................ 192 TV channels also adopt programmatic media model.......................... 193 Programmatic TV poised for take off ..................................... 194 56 Reasons Why Content Marketing Works - 2014 Edition.................... 195 Australia to advance programmatic ....................................... 199 Digital Life and Consumers – October 2014 ............................... 200 Transportation: The Next Major Market of Digital Disruption.............. 205 Google's New Email App Won't Have Ads, Will Bundle Brands' Emails ........ 206 Linkedin Ad Revenue Soars on Strength of Sponsored Content............... 207 Verizon's New Content Marketing Tech Website Hits A Snag................. 208 Youtube, Speaking the Language of TV, Wins Big Brands Like Kia ........... 209 Serving Mobile Advertising An Opportunity ............................... 211 Apple revamps mobile ads with retargeting options........................ 215 URL Masking Is Another Type Fraud Plaguing Automated Ad Buying Marketplaces ........................................................................ 216 Scoring With Gamified Content ........................................... 217 Five Predictions for How Data Will Change TV This Season................. 219 Why It's Key to Build Marketing Into Existing Products and Make Every Employee a Marketer ..................................................... 221 Meet mediamath: The Answer to Your Programmatic Prayers.................. 222 Online TV Viewers Cite Convenience As Driver............................. 227 The programmatic advertising report: Real-Time Bidding Is Taking Over The Digital Ad Market....................................................... 227 Survey Analysis: Customers Rate Their BI Platform Vendor, 2014 ........... 229 Facebook Launches Anonymous Chat App Called ‘Rooms’...................... 229 Social Sharing Reaches Peak Within 24 Hours of Major Events [Study] ...... 231 Slideshare: How Google Works By Eric Schmidt............................. 233 How the Key Trends in Marketing Play Out in Practice..................... 233 Sky explores bespoke ad rates ........................................... 235 Does How You Dress and Look Impact Your Career? Sadly, Yes............... 236 Reach your airline omni-channel customer ................................ 237 Pretargeting and Retargeting: The Future is Now!......................... 238 Upfronts Still Stunt Newfronts .......................................... 239
  5. 5. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 5 A Revisionist’s Recent History of TV and Internet Advertising ............ 242 Nielsen-Adobe Initiative Supports More Demo-Based Digital Buying ......... 246 Paypal says the future of mpay is now ................................... 248 Brands warned on recommendations ........................................ 249 Mediations on Agency Disintermediation .................................. 250 The Human Side Of The Shift to Programmatic T/V (Television/Video) ....... 250 New Google Eye Tracking Study Shows The Downfall Of The Golden Triangle .. 251 Why Growth Is Killing Digital Agencies .................................. 254 Commercial Drones Are Becoming A Reality ................................ 256 17 easy ways to be more awesome today ................................... 257 Three Things Digital-Savvy cmos Are Doing Different...................... 260 Acronym-ity: VRM Are The Three Most Important Letters You've Never Heard Of ........................................................................ 263 Smartphone Shoppers: What They Can Do vs. What They Do................... 264 The original letter that got Kwasi Enin into eight Ivy League colleges ... 266 We're Spending A Lot More Time Online Thanks To Smartphones And Tablets .. 268 Taking the No Out of Innovation ......................................... 269 Today's CMO's matter only if they don't behave like yesterday's CMO's. ... 270 Twitter to drive TV ratings beyond an 'assumption' of engagment .......... 275 Tecnisa starts using drones in construction ............................. 276 Big Data: Hype Or Hope? ................................................. 276 Professional Referral Channels: The Future Of B2B Lead Generation ........ 279 When it comes to marketing “conventional wisdom is often times wrong” .... 280 Breaking up with Facebook: Where are brands and young users going? ....... 281 Innerscope Wins Award For Research Paper on TV Vs. Online Consumer Engagement ........................................................................ 283 Virgin Atlantic Flies High on Content Innovation......................... 284 The revolution behind the blackout of labor.............................. 288 Xaxis Syncs Mobile Ads With Broadcast TV ................................ 288 Delivering a Superior Automotive Customer Experience in Developing Markets 289 Mobile Ad Networks: Capitalizing on Data Advantages...................... 295 Thinking Like a Start-Up ................................................ 297 How Will Marketers Buy and Sell Media in 2020............................ 298 Consumer Segments of Consequence in 2020: Are you prepared?.............. 302 #HASHTAG2020............................................................ 305 Six Years to Transform Marketing: Ready. Set. Go!........................ 307 Media in 2020........................................................... 310 How will consumers adjust and adapt to the digital world of 2020? ........ 311 Marketing in 2020 by those who know ..................................... 313 Of Beer, Chocolate and the Commoditization of Ad Tech.................... 315 The heart of the issue: emotional motivators rev up automotive purchase intentions around the world ............................................. 316 Rise In Cord-Cutting Creates Opportunities For Marketers................. 319 Mindshare And Blab Announce Adaptive Marketing Partnership............... 320
  6. 6. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 6 Brazil's TV Viewers Most Likely to Multiscreen with Smartphones .......... 321 A Harvard Woman Figured Out How To 3D Print Makeup From Any Home Computer, And The Demo Is Mindblowing ............................................. 322 Coca-Cola Lifts Lid on Agency Bonuses for Cutting-Edge Work.............. 327 Why Algorithms Are The Next Star Designers .............................. 328 Which Mummy tribe do you belong to? ..................................... 330 Kill Screen: How The Rules Of Social Games Are Creeping Into The Real World ........................................................................ 339 7 Jeff Bezos Quotes That Will Change The Way You Think About Business .... 341 Store Checkout 'Beep' Gets a Coke Twist in Brazilian Campaign ............ 342 How Long Will It Take for Brands to Catch Up to the Mobile Consumer? ..... 343 Programmatic splits media companies ..................................... 344 Disclosing A Mobile Fallacy ............................................. 344 Why multi-screen television moves the audience measurement goalposts ..... 346 The case for eating steak and cream ..................................... 347 10 life lessons from a Navy Seal ........................................ 348 Age Of The Customer ..................................................... 357 SMG, Twitter Find (Surprise) Twitter Is Impacting TV..................... 360 SAP Marketing VP Bolts to Content Marketing Startup newscred ............. 360 Comparing Ad Automation To Wall Street Exchanges......................... 361 The Slide That Launched a Thousand Arguments at Cannes................... 362 The Most Ambitious Artificial Intelligence Project In The World Has Been Operating In Near Secrecy For 30 Years .................................. 364 10 Breakthrough Innovations That Will Shape The World In 2025 ............ 366 2015 Economic Outlook – Brazil .......................................... 376 Native Advertising Comes to E-Commerce .................................. 377 Follow the tips below to use whatsapp: .................................. 378 Google's Smart Contact Lenses Are Going to Become a Real Thing ........... 379 In-Car Wi-Fi Will Create Opportunities for Advertisers Down the Road ..... 380 Heartbeat replace passwords on smartphones .............................. 381 TV Consolidation: Bringing the Long-Term Back Into Focus................. 382 Why Marketers Love Big Data & Hadoop .................................... 385 How to come back to work after a vacation without being miserable ........ 387 The characteristics that André Esteves search in young................... 388 L'Oréal app provides direct contact ..................................... 389 Dr Adam Fraser says the ‘Third Space’ is crucial for work/life balance ... 390 The 4 Cs of Customer Engagement: The People Want Content!................ 391 Implications Of The Meeker Report: The Rising Role Of Translation ........ 392 US programmatic to expand abroad ........................................ 393 Video ads should reach $ 5 billion by 2016 .............................. 394 Pepsico champions design ethos .......................................... 395 5 trends for online advertising in Brazil ............................... 396 Rebooting youtube....................................................... 397 10 Toxic Relationships Mentally Strong People Avoid...................... 402
  7. 7. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 7 Paying with cash or card replaced by smartphones at register ............. 406 Do You Really Believe In The Second Screen? ............................. 409 What Makes A Great Pinterest Or Instagram Image?......................... 410 Storytelling plays key role for GE ...................................... 412 What Makes A Great Pinterest Or Instagram Image?......................... 412 Emerging trends in mobile and what they mean for your business ........... 414 WPP Media Agency Group to Offer Flexible Alternative to Xaxis ............ 416 An Open Letter to My Son's Kindergarten Teacher.......................... 418 16 Key Trends in Digital Marketing cmos Should Embrace................... 420 German Minister Wants to Outlaw Late-Night Work Email.................... 422 Venda de tablets pode superar a de pcs .................................. 424 Reckitt targets eshopper emotions ....................................... 425 Australian measurement data questioned .................................. 425 Blurred creativeand Media Lines Are Good For The Bottom Line ............. 428 Data vs. Insights – They’re Not the Same, Not Even Close................. 429 2015 Planning - Big Budget Considerations for Every CMO.................. 432 These 3 Digital Marketing Trends Are About to Change Advertising ......... 435 TV Still Dominates World Media Use ...................................... 437 This Wallet Connects With Your Phone So You'll Never Lose Either Of Them Again Call it the Internet of things you hate losing..................... 439 How To Manage Up (Can I Lead My Boss?) .................................. 440 How you’re being fooled by Ikea ......................................... 441 10 Rules To Manage Your Boss (via The Smart Manager)..................... 444 Why mailchimp Is Killing Auto-Responders: The Rise of CRM................ 445 Rentrak On Track To Gather Data From 26M Set-Top Box Homes............... 446 China plans its own PC system ........................................... 446 The 5 Top Trends in Brazilian Media ..................................... 447 Next in Cross-Screen Marketing: Attribution, Please...................... 448 Programmatic Is Awesome and It’s OK to Be Afraid......................... 449 Why Audience Buying is another failed digital marketing path ............. 450 Eight trends shaping digital marketing in the auto industry.............. 451 Google hits back at News Corp blog ...................................... 454 Lego Customer Journey ................................................... 456 Facebook solves cookie question ......................................... 456 My Car Won't Talk To Me ................................................. 458 Most People Want Smartwatches To Track Their Activities.................. 459 The Battle to Own Branded Content ....................................... 460 Brands focus on big charity partners .................................... 461 BBDO tops ranking of world's smartest agencies........................... 462 Negotiation tactics to help you score what you want while travelling ..... 463 FBI’s facial recognition system will combine faces of criminals and ordinary citizens................................................................ 466 Next-Gen Social Analytics Are Transforming Digital Marketing ............. 471 Trading desks come to Brazil ............................................ 472
  8. 8. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 8 How One-Touch Payment May Solve Retail’s Mobile Challenge................ 474 Eric Schmidt-Backed Datorama Wants To Make Madison Avenue More Agile, Less Tied Up In Infrastructure ............................................... 475 Facebook Relaunches Atlas Ad Platform, Addresses Metrics Challenge ....... 476 Beacons: The Opportunity For Rich CRM ................................... 477 Where Segmentation Fails ................................................ 479 Programmatic hits tipping point ......................................... 481 Emerging markets drive device growth .................................... 483 Ello is the anti-Facebook, but will it last?............................. 484 HIGHLIGHTS | Price Versus Perceived Value: The Demand for Smartwatches and Other Wearable Technology ............................................... 485 Study: People Are Not Most Attentive When Watching TV at Home / Better recall on smartphones ................................................... 486 Carl Icahn: Now paypal Needs To Buy Or Merge With Another Payments Company 488 Brand experience tops reputation ........................................ 489 Agency Execs: Programmatic TV Will Pick Up In 2015....................... 490 Pact Includes Content Pilots ............................................ 490 Data Tidal Wave: Opportunity and Responsibility.......................... 490 A pioneering woman in venture capital on why you shouldn't have a career plan ........................................................................ 492 Seven Surefire Strategies To Retain Your Clients......................... 494 Why I regret being a nice boss .......................................... 495 5 Ingredients for an Analytical Organization............................. 497 Ready for a Vice Talk Show? Vice News to Develop Scheduled Live Shows With Skype................................................................... 499 Site speed is vital for e-tailing ....................................... 500 Havas' Bollore: Size Doesn't Matter; Innovation Does..................... 501 The End of the Agency? .................................................. 502 Four Steps To Ease Marketers Into Programmatic Buying.................... 503 Dwell time a proxy for engagement ....................................... 505 What Really Makes a Digital Ad 'Premium?' Three Ways Advertisers Can Get More Bang for Their Premium Buck ............................................. 506 AOL And Publicis Groupe’s Programmatic Video Expansion Aligns As Market Shifts.................................................................. 507 Will the future of sports reporting include sports reporters?............ 508 Why It's So Hard To Detect Emotion In Emails And Texts................... 510 Google Now Is The Smartest Virtual Assistant............................. 516 The Myths And Realities Of Advertising Algorithms........................ 516 Programmatic Is Growing Up .............................................. 520 How leaders deal with moments of existential crisis...................... 521 IPG Begins Buying Local Broadcast Programmatically: Can Target, Retarget Viewers In Near Real-Time ............................................... 523 The Quest to Put More Reality in Virtual Reality......................... 524 Bringing In The Big Guns: Helping The C-Suite Go Programmatic ............ 528 Guided Meditation Offers Relaxing Virtual Reality........................ 529
  9. 9. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 9 The Home Page Is Dead and Microsites Are the Future - What That Means for New gtlds................................................................... 531 The Top 10 Tech Trends among Brazilians in 2014.......................... 533 The 'Internet of Things' Will Be The World's Most Massive Device Market And Save Companies Billions Of Dollars ...................................... 534 The Next Big Step in Asset Identification is Here -- Charlene Weisler .... 534 The Biggest Trends Shaping The E-Commerce Industry Ahead Of The Holidays . 536 Beacons Enter the World of Sports, Airports & Now a Car Show ............. 538 Marketers Agree: Data, Analytics Key In Marketing - But Not All Use It ... 539 Global Agency Media Deals: Trust Us Because We Are Big (And Thus Biased) . 540 Finally, Google Releases Data On Voice Search............................ 542 Pepsi's CMO Talks Mobile ................................................ 543 A Powerful Cocktail: Mixing Retargeting With Content Marketing ........... 544 Devices And OTT Lead Video Consumption Growth............................ 545 Broadcast Prime Highest ROI, Nielsen Undercounting as Much as 20% -- Bill Harvey.................................................................. 546 Marketing searches for new executive profile............................. 548 The Car IS the Information Superhighway ................................ 549 Samsung announces new super fast Wi-Fi technology........................ 552 Behind The Velvet Rope: Private Marketplaces Suffer Growing Pains ........ 553 Facebook's New Emerging Market Mobile Strategy Is A Win For Brands ....... 557 Programmatic is good for creativity ..................................... 558 Learning from the State Department ...................................... 559 How to Reject People and Hire Them Later: A Handbook..................... 560 The Five Deadliest Career Mistakes ...................................... 563 Yes, You Can Manufacture Creativity. Here's How.......................... 568 Mcdonalds announces that 'Happy Meals' will now be accompanied by books, not toys.................................................................... 570 Global agency benchmarking and negotiation – Case study.................. 571 The Shared View of the Customer Journey: The Key to Marketing Success .... 572 Online video boosts offline sales ....................................... 574 You've tried everything to organize your priorities better, and still end up scattered. Try these outside-the-box ideas for sorting your day. ......... 575 It's The Algorithms' World, And We're Just Living In It.................. 577 Few Familiar With 'Internet Of Things' .................................. 578 Online PR: Should You Pitch or Ignore These 6 HARO Personas? ............. 578 Don't Just Target The Moment: Be A Companion On The Journey.............. 581 Everything You Need to Know About Finding and Nurturing Leads ............ 582 The Future of Across-Screen Advertising: Part II......................... 583 6 Ways to Prove You're a Genuine Superstar at Work....................... 585 The secret tricks airports use on you ................................... 587 Teams Can’t Innovate If They’re Too Comfortable.......................... 594 Emerging Asia open to m-commerce ........................................ 595 Ericsson consumerlab: Urbanization drives m-commerce interest in emerging Asia.................................................................... 596
  10. 10. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 10 The Latest in Wearable Tech: Electronic Music-Inspired Clothing.......... 598 How Can Brands and Agencies Succeed Together?............................ 600 Generation Y: How to stay happy in one job .............................. 606
  11. 11. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 11 Depth is more effective than reach 12 January 2015 LONDON: Marketers prepared to look beyond the traditional reach approach can generate a greater return on investment using a depth strategy which creates greater and more sustainable impact by generating advocacy and driving repurchase. These are the conclusions of Omaid Hiwaizi, chief strategy officer, UK at Geometry Global, and Dan White, chief marketing officer at Millward Brown Europe, who explain their findings in the current issue of Admap. They have developed a mathematical equation to address the primary and secondary marketing effect of a brand activity and to understand the reach of each and their impact per channel: effect of activity = (Reach of activity × impact per encounter) + (Reach of advocacy generated × impact per encounter). Inputting Millward Brown data revealed that, for a mainstream consumer brand with a target audience of 10m, a reach strategy yielded a 2.1% brand impact, while a depth strategy returned a figure of 2.6%. They argued that such results challenged conventional wisdom around marketing communications approaches. Depth strategies drive the effects of advocacy and brand video-sharing, but the authors conceded that much depended on the quality of the creative. "Just 15% of word-of-mouth campaigns reach over 42% of the total audience, they noted. "Brand videos do have the opportunity to achieve significant reach, with the 15% most viewed videos achieving an average of 454,000 views." Red Bull is a striking example of a brand built through depth of engagement, with last year's Red Bull Stratos event – where Felix Baumgartner became the first person to break the sound barrier with a freefall jump from 128,000 feet above the Earth – something that will continue to be talked about and distributed socially for a long time afterwards. "By reimagining success in terms of brand impact, the spotlight shifts to the unquestionable power of great creative ideas in driving greater returns," they write, while suggesting that there is an opportunity for agencies and brands to change their ways of working to increase the frequency of these 'hit' ideas which work across multiple channels. "As broadcast media continues to fragment, this new standard will cease to be 'nice to have', and become mandatory for work to generate a return." Data sourced from Admap Creating engagement:Depth over reach Omaid Hiwaizi and Dan White Geometry Global and Millward Brown Europe Admap: January 2015 This article argues that brands should aim for deeper brand experiences and audience engagement as this is a more effective way of building a brand, and sets out a measure to compare different types of brand activity.
  12. 12. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 12 • One example of a brand that uses deep brand experiences is Red Bull, which uses a distinctive marketing strategy built around interesting and inspiring events. • Moving focus to depth rather than reach demands new marketing metrics, which are by necessity more complex than reach metrics. • The value of primary and secondary impacts of brand activity is analysed using existing data from Millward Brown, finding that a depth strategy is more effective. • Both reach and depth strategies are likely to generate a positive ROI, but depth strategies create a greater and more sustainable impact by driving advocacy. While both reach and depth approaches are likely to glean a return on investment, the nature of depth strategies will allow brands employing them to create greater and more sustainable impact by generating advocacy and driving repurchase. Since the early 1990s there have emerged a plethora of different brand-building media and touchpoints – ranging from personalised direct mail, experiential events, shopper marketing, digital media and platforms through to social media – which are now available at scale. While the marketing communications industry has traditionally concerned itself with the efficient delivery of optimised messages to target consumers, this growth of digital and the strategic maturity of below- the-line communications has torn up the rule book, creating an unprecedented opportunity to provide more immersive, participatory and even profound experiences for consumers, and empowering brands to have a much more significant role to play in people's lives. These media have a deeper effect on the audience through being more experiential – multisensory and immersive – resulting in deeper, more vivid memories, which result in more frequent recall. They're better conceived as branded experiences, whichever touchpoints are utilised, and as such should have an interesting story, which the audience can easily share. We do not study the specific psychological and physiological impacts of these media in more detail here. This is the subject for another article in its own right.
  13. 13. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 13 Red Bull: through events such as Red Bull Flugtag, it builds a depth of engagement with customers Crucially, because these media enable brands to connect directly with people and influence their behaviour, the success of strategies employing them is naturally quantified in a more direct, scientific and transparent way. Where once – dispossessed of a better alternative – planners appraised communications in terms of their reach, evaluation models are now available which gauge the depth of engagement and response a campaign has elicited among its primary audience (how much it mattered to them, how long it affected them and how exactly it influenced their propensity to buy) as well as the secondary audience which results from the word-of-mouth effect of deep engagement. In our view, the best example of a brand built through depth of engagement is Red Bull. Since its launch in 1987, Red Bull has focused on a distinctive depth-based marketing strategy to deliver its 'gives you wings' idea, with digital and social integrated into a series of interesting and inspiring events including Red Bull X-Fighters and Red Bull Air Race, where the world's top motocross riders and pilots respectively show off their tricks in front of tens of thousands of spectators, and which then reach an audience of tens of millions. They focus on authentic relationships with key athletes and with passionate fans – giving fans opportunities to take part through events such as the Red Bull Flugtag competitions, where fans can comically fly their home-made human-powered aeroplane creations. Red Bull has also directly engaged its audience in promotion and sampling through a multitude of initiatives – the Red Bull Wings Team sampling squads, the Student Brand Manager Programme – and generated content via the Red Bull Bedroom Jam (musicians) and Red Bull Reporter (young reporters at events). Indeed, Red Bull has shown that initiatives such as the Red Bull Wings Team have a measurable effect on brand launches and take-up. The pinnacle of Red Bull's depth approach was perhaps Red Bull Stratos. On 14 October 2012, Felix Baumgartner became the first person to break the sound barrier with a freefall jump from 128,000 feet above the Earth that reached a speed of 833.9 miles per hour. Some 8 million people watched live via YouTube and the video has been viewed over 10 million times subsequently. This represents around £100 million in worldwide media value and Red Bull Stratos will continue to be talked about and distributed socially for a very long time. This represents extraordinary global reach. Red Bull's different approach has been well documented, with Nancy F Koehn, professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, commenting: "In terms of attracting new customers and enhancing consumer loyalty, Red Bull has a more effective branding campaign than Coke or Pepsi. Red Bull is building a beverage brand without relying on the essential equipment of a mass-marketing campaign. Perhaps the indispensable tools of marketing aren't so indispensable after all." (Brand New: How Entrepreneurs Earned Consumers' Trust from Wedgwood to Dell, Harvard Business School Press, 2001) Despite this, why then do agencies and clients continue to have challenges in embracing these new opportunities to find better ways to build brands? First, tipping the scales in favour of depth strategies will almost certainly serve as a catalyst for industry revolution. It sets a new framework for effectiveness for brands and agencies to value experience over reach. It brings a whole new set of priorities to the fore and with them an onus on the industry to behave differently. How should we, therefore, value these lower-reach immersive experiences versus higher-reach shallow experiences such as TV viewing or reading the press? While the cost per contact is likely to be orders of magnitude more, and the reach orders of magnitude less, the effect on the recipient will be stronger and longer lasting.
  14. 14. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 14 Understanding reach is simple and the typical KPIs well established, focusing on cost-per-contact. Depth of experience is more complicated, measured by the enduring impact it can have on the recipient, specifically placing a brand as part of a human relationship and shaping how they relate to the world around them. These mental patterns create opportunities for recall and advocacy, that have a significant role in driving frequency of purchase and penetration of a brand, which is ultimately more valuable. Our intention is to provide the tools to provoke a more intelligent, grounded and practical conversation about the true success of multidiscipline communications. To effect this, a fair comparison must be made between these very different kinds of brand activity, and a number of considerations and variables assessed. A common currency is needed to compare brand-building effects, one that can be applied fairly to any type of brand encounter and has been proven to relate to actual purchasing behaviour. The ideal currency should work for brand encounters that have a large and long-lasting impact on behaviour as well as those having a weak, transient effect. For this reason, brand predisposition measures that have been proven to relate to individuals' subsequent purchasing behaviour have been used in the calculations in this paper. We have chosen Millward Brown's Brand Power score – a generalised measure of consumers' predisposition to choose one brand over another. Crucially, this doesn't simply measure sentiment or attitude but also propensity to buy; indeed, there is almost a one-to-one relationship between changes in Brand Power and changes in Volume Share. For example, word of mouth creates three times more impact with each person it reaches than does TV advertising, but TV typically reaches three times as many people (Figure 1). The final dimension is the effect of marketing activity on a secondary audience via advocacy. We need to quantify effect on people who encounter the message initially and also the effect on other people who hear about the brand or its content through advocacy and sharing.
  15. 15. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 15 Estimating the prevalence of advocacy is complex. Certain categories naturally enjoy far higher levels of conversation than others. Millward Brown's Social Pulse metric demonstrates this – putting electronics and automotive far ahead of categories such as FMCG and personal care, which reflects the due diligence people apply for predominantly rational purchases. Sharing of branded content, however, does not follow this category pattern. The 10 most viewed brand videos on YouTube in 2013 included personal care (Dove), soft drinks (Pepsi), retail (Kmart), insurance (GEICO) and household products (Poo Pourri). What unifies these is the power of their creative ideas, which clearly can transcend traditionally staid and passive category norms to create depth experiences. Millward Brown recently analysed the characteristics of brand videos that achieve this. Common traits of viral successes include being: highly original and distinctive; very enjoyable to watch, highly involving; loaded with social currency (i.e. people want to be the person who shares it with others); and well branded (hence easier to describe). For example, in 2013 Unilever's Dove campaign 'Real Beauty Sketches' was one of the viral success stories of the year, attracting over 62 million views to date with its emotionally powerful message which felt true to the brand. According to Millward Brown's CrossMedia database, online video has an incredibly strong brand impact per encounter, but relatively low reach. Dove's campaign proves that truly creative and contagious depth strategies have the potential to create extraordinary reach. We have developed an approach to assimilate the primary and secondary marketing effect of a brand activity, understanding the reach of each and their impact per channel: Effect of activity =
  16. 16. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 16 (Reach of activity × impact per encounter) + (Reach of advocacy generated × impact per encounter). For an established mainstream consumer brand then, with a target audience of 10 million, how do the two strategies compare using the Brand Impact metric when considering similar spend and creative input? Using Millward Brown's benchmarks, the differences are surprising. A reach strategy (to include TV, press, online display and price promotion) yields a 2.1% brand impact. A depth strategy meanwhile (comprising sampling, Facebook engagement, Facebook advocacy, shared brand videos and themed promotions) returns a 2.6% brand impact penetration on the overall audience figures – challenging conventional wisdom around marketing communications approaches. The large volume of people who are exposed to a reach strategy message (even at a low impact level per exposure) drive its significant impact. It owes its resilience to sheer economies of scale, which have a tendency to augment overall figures by providing an enormous quantity of encounters (75% of the total target) at a shallow brand impact per encounter (4.7%). While most reach strategies preclude a strong brand impact per exposure, 'depth strategies' drive the effects of advocacy and brand video-sharing. These, of course, are highly variable and depend on the quality of the creative – just 15% of word-of-mouth campaigns reach over 42% of the total audience. Brand videos do have the opportunity to achieve significant reach, with the 15% most viewed videos achieving an average of 454,000 views. In short, while both approaches are likely to glean a return on investment, the nature of depth strategies will allow brands employing them to create greater and more sustainable impact by generating advocacy and driving repurchase. By reimagining success in terms of brand impact, the spotlight shifts to the unquestionable power of great creative ideas in driving greater returns by not only engaging the primary audience but also through advocacy to a potentially huge secondary audience. Starbucks – now a $1.4 billion company – built its entire business this way: deliberately avoiding employing reach strategies and rarely investing in traditional media. A fixation with providing quality beverages and excellent customer service led to organic word-of-mouth marketing. Those who had a good experience told their friends, family and colleagues and the brand quickly grew. There is an opportunity for agencies and brands to change their ways of working to increase the frequency of these 'hit' ideas which work across multiple channels. As broadcast media continues to fragment, this new standard will cease to be 'nice to have', and become mandatory for work to generate a return. The fragmentation of media and its expert usage presents additional challenges to agencies and brands. Which to use? Why? How? What message? This demands a more precise understanding of human behaviour and the role of these specific touchpoints. Geometry Global, for example, has its unique 'Precision Activation' approach, centred on the 'Purchase Decision Journey' tool to map behaviour and the context at every touchpoint in the journey. So it seems that where the question was once 'How do we disseminate a message to as many people as possible and ensure they see it?', the question is now 'How do we use human insight to provide experiences for audiences which resonate culturally, in ways that drive recall and advocacy?' With the ability to comprehensively challenge the effectiveness of a wider 'reach' strategy with a performance-driven 'depth' approach, another – more solemn question – is advanced: 'How long can traditional advertising survive as the lead media channel?'
  17. 17. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 17 2 PowerfulTrendsfor the TV Buyer to Considerin 2015 By Paul Bremer Video Jan 9, 2015 In the New Year, TV buyers should take a close look at in-stream video and authenticated viewing. Now that we have reached a new year and the upfront season is only a few months away, it is appropriate to reflect on the TV side of the video business. Recently, this arena has become ever more fascinating, with opportunity seemingly everywhere. Shifts in media consumption and the resulting shifts in the industry at large have been giving TV planners and buyers plenty of food for thought over the past several years. New trends emerging in the landscape include programmatic TV, cross-screen targeting, mobile video, and video ad-tech solutions. There’s never been a more interesting time in video and I’d suggest that trends in in-stream video and authenticated video viewing are the two largest triggers to further expansion. As we look at in-stream video, it’s clear that there is no better solution for TV decision makers to transition into the digital marketplace. In fact, video tracking and reporting in this area now practically mirror the broadcast experience and often deliver more detailed metrics. Thanks to Online Campaign Ratings (OCR) and Validated Campaign Essentials (VCE), we are seeing a bit of a revolution through standardization. Industry measurement standards like VAST and VPAID make in-stream an undeniably appealing proposition. In 2015, we also find our industry getting greater bearings on monetization. For evidence, look no further than the rise of "TV Everywhere" and authentication. As TV Everywhere picks up its pace, so does authenticated video viewing. And, no longer daunted by the business opportunity, big media companies now believe this is a great revenue stream. We’ve tackled this on both short- and long-form content, and this is helping us build our very own digital video economy that complements traditional linear TV. As we rapidly become one big happy video investment group, we have wisely broken down silos and put ad dollars behind consumers, their viewing patterns, and preferences. In their recent Video Monetization Report Q3 2014, FreeWheel rightly noted that people have tended to doubt the growth of TV Everywhere. And, that’s been shortsighted. It’s on. And, as they report, programmers are putting more and more content behind the authentication wall. And, guess what? As 46 percent of long-form and live video ad views now come from authenticated users, consumers are following "in droves." This figure is actually up 368 percent year-over-year. Live viewing, OTT device usage, and authenticated viewing are all booming simultaneously. We should take heart, as FreeWheel reports, that 46 percent of long-form and live monetization came from behind an authentication wall in Q3 of 2014. That is well above the 14 percent they reported for 2013. And, with a nod to the new cross-screen reality, FreeWheel has started looking at authentication across devices, analysis that will assist our progress as publishers and advertisers, following the consumer. While it remains to be seen how this pattern or trend will play out, their most recent analysis shows that OTT represents the greatest proportion of authenticated video ad views. It is followed by desktop, laptop, and smartphone/tablet viewing. The confluence of consumer adoption and technical innovation forms the bedrock for device neutral video investment. For those who’ve primarily considered their scope to be traditional TV, there is huge upside to embracing today’s new video viewer. These trends are even more pronounced when we isolate the younger end of the 18 to 49 demo. Cross-device consumption and marketing are on the rise all at once. 2015 just may be the year that we see true screen agnosticism and parity in video advertising investments. Let’s hope so, because it should be fun.
  18. 18. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 18 Data Becomes CES Rising Star For Advertisers by Laurie Sullivan, New technology such as connected cars, connected watches and other connected devices doesn't always have marketing and advertising applications initially -- but as the applications mature, brands find the data more useful for better ad targeting across devices and media channels. Most of these devices will focus on mobile tech. With Apple Watch due out early this year, connected clothing will move from experimental use in skiwear to smart socks, tennis shoes to biometric running shirts. Sportswear manufacturer O'Neill Europe launched in Munich, Germany, its first wearable electronics product in 2004. The snowboard jacket made of smart fabric to withstand freezing and harsh environments was jointly designed and developed by Infineon Technologies AG to wirelessly connect the wearer to music. CES attendance by marketer continues to increase. Audit summaries from 2013 and 2014 released by the Consumer Electronics Association, which produces CES, estimates that 5,315 advertising and marketing professionals attended the show in 2014, up nearly 9% from the prior year. For marketers attending CES, understanding the technology means more than being the first to learn about how it works -- it's about learning the technology that can help them get their messages into the minds of consumers. Online advertisers won't see the influence of Nvidia's refocus (announced at CES) on semiconductor chips for automobiles and connected devices for a while. But the company's fame arose from developing some of the most sophisticated visual chips in graphic display cards. Announcing a new chip Sunday, Nvidia says it will provide double the performance of its past chips, and the first mobile chip to perform a trillion operations per second, or a teraflop of computing. Brands will be thankful for that power as more cars, wearables and home gadgets -- like the thermostats that connect online through an IP address -- begin to expand options for ad targeting. Services from companies like Automatic will tell Google's home thermostat system from Nest Labs when you're driving home. Aside from Automatic, connections made visible through agreements between Nest and Philips and LG bring appliances into the mix. The goal is to give brains to the connected home -- all controlled by the car's system or mobile smartphone. 5 Agency Leaders on Which Industry ChangesKeep Them Up at Night Doing more with less, and doing it faster By Noreen O'Leary December 23, 2014 Advertising & Branding As 2014 winds down, Adweek asked advertising and media leaders about what's been top of mind for them this year. Across marketing disciplines, there are nuances among their concerns but what they all share is the urgency to adapt to changes in technology, consumers and the larger world. Here are their thoughts: • Rei Inamoto, worldwide chief creative officer, AKQA Talent shortage is last year's problem. This has been talked about as the single biggest problem facing our industry. I don't think that's the issue. We try not to think about upcoming trends. That makes us near-sighted and chasing short-term gains that may not pay off long-term. Rather, it's
  19. 19. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 19 more important to look five years into the future and think about how to create an organization that endures for many decades to come. With that, one thing that keeps me up at night is this: Do More With Less. This is the biggest challenge facing our industry today and for pretty much eternity. We are in the business of selling creativity as quantified by the amount of time and the number of people. The success of our business is measured by numerical growth: revenue, margin, size, number of people and wins. But actually, the world is going in the other way. It's now about achieving the most with the least. It's about figuring out how to "Do More With Less." Less time, less money and less people. Companies that will be successful—not in 2015 but in 2020 and beyond—are those who will be smaller than their predecessors but can have bigger impact and influence. • Susan Gianinno, North American chairman, Publicis Companies of all shapes and sizes have to reinvent themselves to keep up with and take full advantage of the seismic and unabating changes in every aspect of marketing, media and communications. Everyone needs to be faster, smarter, more agile, more acutely attuned to culture and context and more adept and facile with new capabilities, including social, search, connected content and devices. Our job is to be an indispensable partner in helping our clients in their own marketing transformation. Another huge shift is the millennial momentum. They are coming into their own with a vengeance while baby boomers redefine aging as merely a transitional phase marked by good health and continued restlessness. There's also the radically altered ethnic landscape where minorities will soon become the majority. Then there's the increasing gap between the haves and the have-nots, which is eliminating the big middle market that kept some of our biggest brands thriving. We need to help our clients reposition to address this bifurcation. The middle is gone. • Daryl Simm, global CEO, Omnicom Media Group Data and analytics: It has been at the top of our agenda since we launched (analytics unit) Annalect in 2009 and it accelerates change across our entire organization. This area is expanding quickly and we're all fishing in a talent pool that's only beginning to ramp up. Another thing is building mass brands in a personalized media world. With endless hyper-targeting opportunities, the challenge lies in finding the right balance between transaction drivers, personalized messaging and building mass upper-funnel equity. Every brand situation is different, but we can't lose sight of the end goal, which is building business while not squandering equity. There's also the commoditization of media. In a world of infinite touch-points, we still see examples that trade off brand objectives, engagement, context or ROI. These cases say we've failed to build the client's confidence in the power of their brand's relationships with consumers. It pushes us to develop better analytics to put the focus on results. Getting a great price on what you need is always important. Shopping for cheap gas when you need to take the train, not so much. • Carter Murray, global CEO, FCB The perpetual war on talent continues: Where to find it; how to retain and nurture it. Facebook and Twitter attract millennial talent through strong creative cultures and competitive compensation and by offering them the opportunity to make a difference. We need to remain relevant to the best talent in the world, particularly as it relates to digital acumen. There's a tremendous amount of competition for people who can build 21st century brands. There's also the extreme world events that impact the world economy. In an interconnected world, there are fewer and fewer truly "local" crises. All of which makes the job of managing a global agency network an incredibly complex one—at the financial, human and brand levels. People
  20. 20. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 20 expect modern brands to share their values; to have a role in solving or alleviating crises; or at the very least, to have a voice in the important issues of the day. We need to get better at helping brands understand that responsibility. There are also the business pressures in Russia and Brazil. For years the economic growth of the BRIC markets has driven global performance for agency networks but as Russia and Brazil slow down, there are huge implications. We need to reengineer our operations in these markets, uncover new sources of growth globally and revisit operations in mature markets. We no longer have the luxury of being able to hide behind strong financial and creative performance in Russia and Brazil. • Lou Aversano, New York CEO, Ogilvy & Mather David Ogilvy once said that Ogilvy & Mather is a teaching hospital. The biggest thing that keeps me up at night is how Ogilvy continues to live up to the talent standards he set. Quite simply, this means hiring the most diverse workforce in the world and continuing to invest in our people in a way to keep them inspired, engaged and proud to be at our agency. Ideas are our livelihood and our lifeblood. They need to inspire and they need to shine a light on things that are otherwise hard to see. We need to continue to invest in having the best ideas for our clients and their brands no matter the forum. We need to be brave enough to challenge our legacy models of how things have been done to ensure we continue to set the standard for creativity. Culture is also so important to us. It's often talked about, but often overlooked, underinvested and difficult to measure. Yet, it is what sets us apart. We need to invest to keep the Ogilvy culture alive and kicking so its value is just as strong today as it was yesterday. Why Our Brains Don'tRespond To Our Attempts At Habit Change We often try to change our behavior by reinforcing negative actions. Here's how to reframe your motivation and finally follow though. By Art Markman The human brain is a habit creation machine. Your brain wants to find routines that have succeeded in the past and allow you to repeat those actions again in the future without having to think about them explicitly. Although you may sometimes go out of your way to create a habit (like when you practice a musical instrument or sport), most of the time these habits are formed in the course of your daily routine. You sit at your desk each day at work with your email open. The icon at the bottom of the screen for the program is the same, and you probably put the email window in the same place on your screen. Because you check your email repeatedly throughout the day, you develop habits to look for a badge saying you have new email and to interrupt what you are doing periodically to check your email. At the start of the year, it is natural to want to do things to make yourself more productive. Unfortunately, there is a tendency to focus on behaviors that get in the way of your productivity and set the goal to stop those behaviors. If you were going to try to be more productive in 2015, what would you do? You might start with a list of five things that get in your way of being productive (checking email too often, browsing the internet unnecessarily, going to too many meetings, etc.). Then, you would focus on reducing these behaviors that waste your time.
  21. 21. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 21 You could think of this strategy as setting negative goals: check email less often, go to fewer meetings, and so on. They are negative goals, because they refer to actions you are not going to take. By focusing on the actions you will take, you give your habit creation system a chance to operate. Unfortunately, the brain mechanisms that develop habits cannot learn not to do something. No matter how many times you successfully avoid checking your email, your habit learning system will still prod you to check it again when you are in the situation where you normally check your email. So, negative goals are doomed to fail, because they do not create a desirable set of habits. As I discuss in my book Smart Change, the alternative is to set positive goals. That is, focus on actions you are going to take that will ultimately conflict with the behaviors you want to stop. Rather than checking your email first thing in the morning, take some time to write, to read new articles in your area of expertise, or to work on big projects. Your email will be there waiting for you when you choose to check it. By focusing on the actions you will take, though, you give your habit creation system a chance to operate. To create positive goals effectively, you have to put in a little effort to plan for the future. Think about the behaviors you want to stop When do you do them? Where? You may not even be entirely sure. If you are doing things by habit, then it may not be obvious when you are performing the undesirable behaviors. That means you may need to take a week and just observe yourself to find out what you are doing. Find new behaviors Find new behaviors that you can perform in situations where you used to do the thing you are trying to stop. A key to successful behavior change is to make the new behavior something that you will do consistently in that particular situation, so that the new behavior becomes associated with that setting. Change your Environment See if you can make changes to your environment to make the new and desirable behavior easy to perform and the undesirable behavior hard to perform. If you want to check your email less often, keep your email program shut off except when you need it. Set an alarm for those times when you want to check email, and keep the program off otherwise. That way, the behavior you don’t want to perform is hard to do. Dual-screeningad tactics evolve 16 December 2014 LONDON: New technology developments mean that advertisers have the ability to reach even those dual screeners who are engaged in second-device activity unrelated to what's happening on TV. A number of adtech businesses have developed listening technology that enables second-screen advertising synching and insights company Millward Brown expects this to take off in the coming year.
  22. 22. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 22 Automatic content recognition technology detects the audio files of commercials as they air and then sends a message to a demand side platform to buy up all of the available inventory in that 30-second window to create the 'synching' effect. While that clearly involves a degree of media efficiency and the ability to hit consumers with multiple messages, Duncan Southgate, global brand director/digital at Millward Brown, pointed out it could be a lot more. "It's also a new storytelling opportunity that allows brands to add extra value for people who just watched their TV spot," he said. "We expect it to grow rapidly in 2015." The effectiveness of this technology was highlighted by one provider at a recent London conference. Fiona Smith, country manager at WyWy, claimed that the use of its LiveSync product by automaker Nissan had led to a 96% increase in brand awareness, compared to a 55% uplift on standalone TV. Further, its SiteSync product, which creates a bespoke landing page directly correlated to an ad, has been shown to more than double conversion rates. Hyundai is using the two together and has reported a 50% uplift in site visits and a near fivefold increase in conversions for a mere 1.5% additional spend. Millward Brown suggested that second-screen synching also offered complementary brands the chance to cross-promote products, with for example, viewers of a TV ad for vodka subsequently seeing an ad for a suitable mixer drink on their digital device. Another possibility was the opportunity to hijack competitor ads by running targeted digital counter- claims at the same time as a competitor's TV ad. "Synching technology seems likely to have broad appeal across categories from financial services to FMCG and looks set to become a standard part of the marketing toolkit for smart advertisers," Millward Brown concluded. Optimum TV ad length varies 4 December 2014 LONDON: There is no such thing as an optimal length for a TV ad, with most video campaigns likely to benefit from a mix of ad lengths, each being used to achieve slightly different objectives. So says Darren Poole, global brand director at Millward Brown. Writing in the current issue of Admap, the focus of which is TV strategy, he notes that the market research agency is testing "significantly fewer 30-second TV ads and many more 15-second TV ads than it was in the 1990s". More clients are also investing in longer 60-second ads. But an analysis of more than 132,000 TV copy test results revealed that, in general terms, all ad lengths can be equally efficient at generating brand-linked memorability and delivering primary messages. Poole cautioned, however, that one should not simply assume therefore that ad length doesn't matter and opt for cheaper 15-second slots. When communication objectives are complex, longer ads are better suited to the task. Similarly, longer ads deliver better on involvement. A combination of the two can work better than either in isolation. "Cut-downs are a critical element of every media plan," said Poole, as he outlined how one UK food brand had aired a 30-second ad in two bursts and achieved an Awareness Index of 6, slightly above average.
  23. 23. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 23 The following season, a 10-second cut-down was introduced into the mix, and the Awareness Index rose to 11, almost doubling the efficiency of the campaign, while communication stayed strong. To get results like this, added Poole, advertisers need to use the memorable elements of the original in the cut-down in an intelligent way and to think whether the structure of the full-length ad actually lent itself to being cut down. Vines and YouTube offer extremes that advertisers also need to consider as they move towards overarching video-based media planning, rather than having separate strategies for TV and digital. For the former's six-second format, Poole advised keeping content "simple but not simplistic" with only one explicit message. The longer options the latter allows have to be creatively engaging and integrate the brand into memorable moments. "Ultimately, what works best for your brand depends on what you are trying to achieve," Poole concluded. Second ScreeningDuringTV Time—It'sNot What You Think OCTOBER 6, 2014 TV becomes just one of many screens competing for attention As digital devices take an increasingly prominent place in the lives of US consumers, media use is becoming characterized not by the influence of any single device or platform, but by the simultaneous use of multiple ones. Consuming digital content in a nonlinear manner, using whatever screen is most convenient at any given time, is now commonplace. And the fluidity with which people access media—whether TV shows, movies, news, music or games—carries implications for content owners, platform providers, technology firms, app developers and marketers, according to a new emarketer report, “Simultaneous Media Use: Screen Fragmentation Complements Traditional Channels.” Of the seemingly infinite ways consumers multitask with media, the most common is the use of a digital device while watching TV. In some cases, this digital activity pertains directly to the show or ad that people watch, while in other instances the activities are unrelated. Although many viewers use ad-skipping technologies or simply tune out during TV commercials, a February 2014 study from Facebook conducted by Millward Brown Digital found that 78% of US internet users accessed second screens during shows, compared with 71% who did so during ads. And among those whose attention drifted to other screens during programs, most picked the run of the show for their excursions, as opposed to limiting second screening to previews, end credits, recaps or songs. This finding might surprise anyone who figured consumers waited until commercials to shift their attention to the “other” screen. Among the most prevalent digital activities during both commercials and shows were checking email and visiting social media. Texting or calling someone was further down the activity list, followed by internet searches and shopping. A far lesser priority for survey participants was looking for information about the show or seeking out products or brands that were advertised during commercial breaks. Again, this finding speaks of fragmented attention rather than responding purposefully to calls to action embedded in content or advertising. The takeaway is that a major portion of digital activity during TV shows has nothing to do with the show or the commercials. People simply drift away from the program and do other activities on
  24. 24. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 24 their devices. This represents a transformation in the role of television from being a focal point to being just one of many screens competing for attention. 5 Things You Need to Know About Data ManagementPlatforms Mathew Sweezey | October 30, 2014 | 0 Comments The future of marketing will depend even more on data, so a data management platform will be the key to helping you stay organized and get the most out of your information. Every time a consumer logs into Facebook, there are some 1,500 posts waiting for them. As brands, trying to break into these over-subscribed social feeds is very difficult, and even more so when our social organic reach is between 2 and 4 percent. These two factors are leading to a massive increase in paid social promotion. A case in point: Facebook's revenue increased by more than 60 percent from Q1 of 2014 to Q2. For brands to be able to keep their edge on social advertising, it is going to take more than amassing followers and fans - it is going to take a large amount of paid social promotion. Paid social promotion runs off of data, and whoever has the best data has the best target. These targets are critical when you want to do target marketing via social. Segmentation is key, just as it is in email marketing. The better your target, the better your offer can be, and the better your engagement rates. So how do you segment for social data? A data management platform (DMP) is how. This is why you need to know about them, and how to use them. 1. It's About Data This is truly the first time I agree big data will change the way you market. The more data you have, and the better context you can derive from it, will be the difference in all social marketing campaigns in the future. There are many different targeting metrics available on each social network, but to a B2B brand these are only half of the story. Most B2B brands now have lead scoring, and marketing automation tools, so they can take targeting to a level no social network can with their data alone. So how do you combine social data, data from your marketing automation tool, and other data sets together? Your DMP, that's how. 2. Self-Serve vs. Full-Service Odds are you are using a DMP without even knowing it. If you use a tool like Demandbase, adroll, Terminus, or any other ad serving platform, those ads are being targeted by using their DMP. There are other options as well. If you are placing your ads for yourself, then you'll need to get your own DMP to keep up with data and make your custom data segments, which can be used by ad networks. There are self-serve dmps, including exelate, bluekai, and Cloudera, to name a few. 3. The Trend Is Growing This isn't a pipe dream that you should expect to have in place in 10 years. Mark Zagorski, chief executive (CEO) of exelate, says currently 8 to 10 percent of Fortune 100 companies use a DMP, and he expects the majority of companies will be using a DMP in some capacity within 24 to 36 months. I agree with him that the trend is moving fast, and it's all due to the new ad networks, and their ability to hyper-target off datasets. 4. First- and Third-Party Data The DMP allows you to combine your data with data from other data sources - your data (first party) can be melded with, or cross-referenced with, other data (third party) to give you more
  25. 25. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 25 information than ever before. So, imagine having a list of all of your leads in stage one, and overlaying a dataset giving you all of their social handles. This would allow you to now do a hyper- targeted social ad buy on any network and only have the ad go to the people in lead stage one. You could then also overlay a dataset to get all of their colleagues to then do hyper-targeted account-based marketing via social in-feed advertising. 5. Cross-Device Connecting The IAB is working on a new type of tracking, which will allow you to track a single user across devices. With that, you could track a single person from each device they are on, and their engagements can be tied back to a central location. That location would be your DMP. So, connecting lots of different data from different places is the key of the DMP. If you're an advanced marketer, have marketing automation, and are already using paid social promotion, then the next step is to look into a DMP. This will be a required piece of equipment in the future, but for now, it's still limited to only a select few due to price, scale, and other aspects. The limitation of the DMP is the scale of your data. If you have a very small dataset, it may be harder to connect the dots, so the first companies to adopt the self-serve DMP are going to be those companies with very large data sets. As time goes on and as matching data and more data is available, we should expect it to move down marketing and into smaller companies. Good luck, and remember the future of marketing is all going to be grounded in the data you have. The DMP is going to be a key tool in helping you to manage this data and get the most out of it. Your Ad Ran Here (Not Really) Next-GenerationProductRecommendations: TheBalance Between Data and Discovery Krista Garcia | October 29, 2014 Contributors: Christine Bittar, Stephanie Kucinskas Executive Summary Most online shoppers are accustomed to the “you might also like x, y, z” approach to product recommendation popularized by sites like Amazon.com. But cross-sells and upsells have become so ubiquitous in ecommerce that even relevant suggestions can blend in with the visual noise on a page. Though it’s not likely this algorithmic-based tactic will disappear any time soon, new ways of suggesting products are gaining in popularity and are being driven by two opposite forces: advances in collecting and analyzing consumer data, and a desire to bring a feeling of serendipity to online shopping. This report will examine how US retailers are building upon established methods of product recommendation and personalizing the customer experience through both computer assistance and human intervention.
  26. 26. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 26 ________________________________________ Key Questions • What do consumers think about personalization? • What challenges do retailers face in developing more personalized product recommendations? • How are visual social networks influencing product recommendations? • How can mobile bring product discovery into the real world? Taking Recommendations Personally At times, product recommendations can feel like part of a site’s fabric—in other words, easy to ignore. And occasionally, they just flat-out miss the mark. As retailers explore new ways to tailor suggestions, the question now is, How personalized do consumers want the shopping experience to be? “One of the things we talk about quite often is when recommendations go wrong,” said Kevin Lindsay, director of product marketing at Adobe Systems. “It’s kind of a slap in the face that this is just a machine calculating the likelihood that I am going to like something based on what other people have done or based on maybe what i’ve done in the past.” Yet despite automated recommendation’s less than stellar reputation, digital shoppers still respond to those suggestions—at least to some degree. When US smartphone users were surveyed by the e-tailing group in September 2014 about retailer personalization preferences for the upcoming holiday shopping season, the highest percentage of respondents (50%) said they were highly or somewhat likely to rely on retail site recommendations. Moreover, 44% said the same of recommendations received from retailers via email. That half of respondents to e-tailing group’s survey had no plans to use site recommendations and an even higher percentage hadn’t any plans to use recommendations from opted-into retail
  27. 27. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 27 newsletters, however, isn’t a particularly strong vote of confidence for either personalization technique. Part of the problem, some say, is an inability to connect the dots about a shopper accurately enough to make effective suggestions. Doug Stephens, founder and president of advisory firm Retail Prophet, believes retailers could provide better product recommendations if they were able to tie together multiple aspects of consumers’ lives, such as purchase behavior, social media activities and online patterns at work. “As consumers, we really don’t lead fully integrated lives online,” he said. “As long as these elements of our lives remain separate modules, it’s very difficult for retailers to understand who I am—or any kind of totality—as a consumer.” Consumers, though, may prefer to maintain barriers between facets of their lives—not everyone is comfortable divulging the information, explicitly or not, necessary to receive highly relevant personalized suggestions. As a May 2014 survey of internet users worldwide by Retail Information Systems (RIS) and Cognizant found, 81% disliked product recommendations based on their social network preferences and 83% disliked retailers using data from social networks to personalize experiences. But the RIS survey also found that consumers’ dislike was swayable, reflecting a reality that while many consumers express concerns about privacy, in practice some will respond to personalized messages when there are benefits to doing so. Slightly more than half in the RIS study said they would respond to personalized messaging as long as service was improved (51%) or they were offered special treatment (54%). Some industry executives, like Graeme Grant, president and COO of retail email personalization company cquotient, think retailers need to demonstrate benefits to shoppers rather than using voluntary personal information as permission to market indiscriminately. “It’s very easy for retailers to say, ‘Great, I can blast them about my clearance sale,’” Grant said. “[But] if that isn’t what the consumer is interested in hearing or that doesn’t add value, then you’re creepy.” “Creepy” is a word that often arises in conversations about personalization. Art Peck, president for growth, innovation and digital at Gap Inc., promised in an April 2014 interview with Buzzfeed that the apparel retailer’s new personalization features would be “cool not creepy.” Many retailers, including Gap, already serve up different products based on past browsing behavior, whether or not shoppers are even aware of it.
  28. 28. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 28 “If you’ve told us and your cookies show us you’re really primarily a baby shopper, then we would probably go and put a baby landing page in front of you rather than landing on the generic brand landing page,” Peck said, adding that such moves lead to shoppers spending more time on the ecommerce site and ultimately buying more. Four Ways That Product Recommendations Are Changing New approaches to product recommendations tend to follow either of two paths: a utilitarian, data- driven direction, or one with an emphasis on the truly personal. But there is still a vast range of personalization initiatives taking place somewhere between the two. And the middle ground is where the retail experience can be less compelling. If the experience is “neither really well curated nor very convenient and friction-free,” said Retail Prophet’s Stephens, the retailer will suffer. Here are four methods that retailers are exploring to skirt the expected “customers also viewed” style of product recommendation. Data Gets More Intelligent Displaying the right products at the right time is a task for big data, and according to cquotient’s Grant, the buzz surrounding big data has shifted from hype to execution. “People are excited about the data. The question then is, well, what do you do with it? And the most obvious thing to do with it is personalization.” Product recommendations are one of the most employed types of website personalization. Among the 68% of US online retailers polled by marketing agency Retention Science in July 2014 that said they personalized some aspect of their sites, nearly 45% percent offered personalized product recommendations and 19% provided personalized offers. Broader types of segmentation, like those based on demographics or geography, are still the most commonly used for personalization, according to the US digital marketers (one-third of which were retailers) surveyed by Forrester Consulting for exacttarget Marketing Cloud in May 2014. Yet a
  29. 29. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 29 significant share (71%) also employed more advanced techniques such as real-time, self-learning analytics, and a majority (57%) turned to artificial intelligence algorithms. Nearly all (94%) of the US data management professionals surveyed by Experian Data Quality in June 2014 said there were challenges related to personalization, though. Foremost was being able to glean insights fast enough. Having sufficient data and incorrect data also contributed to roadblocks. Thirty-eight percent of respondents, for instance, felt they were hampered by inaccurate data, so the inaccuracy fear is not unfounded. While still in the early stages, brands like The North Face have been experimenting with artificial intelligence as a sales tool. Digital agency Fluid, for one, is using IBM’s Watson technology to create a tool for the outdoors outfitter called Expert Personal Shopper that’s scheduled to launch in late 2014. Anyone who witnessed Watson’s stint on the TV quiz show “Jeopardy!” Knows how eerily fast and accurate that technology is. As a sales assistant, the platform will be able to understand natural language queries to serve suggestions based on product reviews (proprietary and external), external sources like Wikipedia and weather information. The technology can be particularly useful for complex products that have a range of specs. For instance, asking, “Which sleeping bag do I need for a camping trip to Yosemite in November?” Will return targeted results based on Yosemite’s geography and climate. Taking this a step further, artificial intelligence also has the potential to better refine recommendations when combined with data like past purchases. Preferences like size, style or color could play roles, too. “When we look at technology like [Watson], everybody recognizes the enormous potential, certainly in retail,” said Retail Prophet’s Stephens. He envisions scaled applications like placement at the ends of aisles to assist in-store customers. Even if artificial intelligence seems a bit farfetched at the moment, there’s no reason that data can’t be used in more sophisticated ways. “We have more data to work with and more tools that know how to take advantage of that data,” said Adobe’s Lindsay. “We can do more, so there’s really no excuse to just use a generic approach.” Visual Social Media Influences Design
  30. 30. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 30 Online product merchandising has been taking a cue from photo-heavy social networks like Pinterest and Instagram. This approach is seeing traction in categories like design and fashion, where looks matter and finding out about new items, brands and designers can be more compelling than skimming a bulleted list of product specs. According to a September 2013 survey of digital shoppers by Fluid, most (77%) had a specific item in mind when beginning to shop, compared to only 8% who came looking for ideas and inspiration. When shopping for apparel/shoes and jewelry/accessories, however, 21% were in this more open mindset. This notion that fashion shoppers welcome discovery more than those looking for practical items like books or electronics was reinforced when respondents were asked about most recent purchases on utilitarian Amazon.com. Only 11% had bought apparel or shoes there compared to 75% buying books or music via that site. More generally, a September 2013 study of consumers by programmatic ad agency Sociomantic Labs found that 41% of respondents know exactly what they want to buy and go to a specific site to buy it when shopping online. But it also found a significant minority (20%) who shop online for fun, adding items to their shopping carts then deciding later whether to complete a purchase. In August 2014, Gap Inc.’s Piperlime brand debuted a revamped site heavy on social shopping. The homepage’s look is more curated and editorial, with clothing grouped into themed, magazine- like spreads. A so-called Style Feed displays tiled images—mostly of stylish women—in a Pinterest-like grid format. The feed can be sorted by hashtagged trends like #plaid, by guest editors like Christina Tosi, chef and co-owner of New York and Toronto bakery chain momofuku milk bar, or content like the series “3X the Chic,” which demonstrates comparable styles at three different prices. What looks and feels candid on Piperlime’s Style Feed is anything but. It heavily features fashion bloggers in Instagrammed outfits put together around themes like #everdaytees and flanked by a scrolling column of suggested products to recreate the look. It’s only after clicking on an item that shoppers end up on a traditional product page where they can add apparel to a cart. “I consider the fundamental transition of the site from a shopping portal to a catalog portal to be a shift in service,” said David Selinger, CEO and co-founder of retail personalization firm richrelevance, characterizing Piperlime’s pivot as part of a new wave of merchandising. “You are changing your overall value proposition to the consumer.” Instagram appears to be the network of choice for capturing an aesthetic-minded audience. In September 2014, upscale department store chain Nordstrom tapped 11 New York-based fashion bloggers, editors and marketers to photograph fall accessories in their individual styles. Instagrams are featured on the ecommerce site as part of shopping guides (called “Instalogs”) for hosiery, jewelry, handbags and boots. Digital Seeps Into The Physical World The push for omnichannel retailing is also driving personalization in the real world. And in turn, once online-only stores like eyewear retailer Warby Parker, menswear merchant Bonobos and the aforementioned Piperlime, are opening brick-and-mortar locations that are able to provide in-store data. “Because they are already natively digital, they’re implementing personalization from the get- go,” said cquotient’s Grant. “So the purpose of the store is almost to know a customer in a better and fuller way, as opposed to the store just being [about] sales per square foot.” Mobile is often the bridge between online and in-store. Mobile-based personalization applications can be as simple as sales associates using hand-held devices to access loyalty members’ past purchases to make new recommendations, or as complex as beacons pushing product suggestions to consumers’ devices based on location and physical browsing behavior. Those two
  31. 31. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 31 extremes were at play among the US omnichannel retailers surveyed by the e-tailing group in April 2014. Tablets were already being used by 60% to enhance the customer experience, while 14% employed Bluetooth technology to do so, a figure that’s certain to rise. This holiday season should see a jump in the number of retailers testing beacons. “More than half of the top 100 retailers are actively working with beacon technology now—they’re in different stages, but all of them are evaluating, testing, piloting, trying it out,” said Rob Murphy, vice president of marketing at Swirl, an in-store mobile marketing platform provider. Richrelevance’s Selinger sees location-based apps as the future of personalization, and with a focus on convenience and time-saving rather than price. “Where you gain the big heart of the American consumer—and the Western consumer generally—is where you start saving her five to 10 minutes,” he said. “I mean very specifically: I am going to prevent you from having to wait in line.” His hypothetical example involved a retailer using beacons to remind customers entering the store to pick up an online order. A text could be sent when the item is ready (if it’s not already) and suggest companion products and point to where they are located. Consumer sentiment, however, suggests that many people are not yet ready for this kind of retail experience. According to engagement platform punchtab, just over one-quarter (28%) of US smartphone owners polled by the company in April 2014 considered personalized recommendations to be an “acceptable” use of in-store location tracking. Generally negative consumer attitudes aren’t stopping retailers from trying, however. Kate Spade New York, for instance, has made several efforts to integrate digital commerce into the real world shopping experience. Last year the lifestyle brand used shoppable window displays in pop-up locations to promote its new online-only Kate Spade Saturday line. This September, the company began testing touchscreens installed in the scaffolding at a store under construction in Short Hills, New Jersey. Shoppers who interact with the screens are quizzed on their style, then emailed or texted product recommendations for eight items. Those who go on to buy get free one-day
  32. 32. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 32 shipping. Planned for at least one other future location, these interactions also serve as market research for Kate Spade to gauge which styles may perform better in certain locations. Tech firms are doing their bit, too. Google Now, the Siri-like virtual assistant accessed directly on Android phones or through Google Search on ios, is an opt-in application that accesses location history, web browsing habits and calendars to do things like provide commuting estimates and pull together travel itineraries. But it also has retail implications. It allows users to set shopping reminders, including location-prompted ones. For instance, it will alert a shopper that they need to buy laundry detergent when near Target, if that’s what they requested. Users can also receive notifications when near a store that stocks a product they recently searched for on Google. Looking farther into the future, in the next decade Retail Prophet’s Stephens envisions what he calls a “meta-service” where consumers will pay to use one provider to store all of their information. The idea is that this will eventually lead to more contextual recommendations. “Once we get to that point, we can start to get more intelligent recommendations based on where I am, who I’m with, what I’m doing, what my finances are at the moment, what my shopping behavior has been like over the last year or two years or whatever time frame,” he said. In that environment, Stephens speculated, digital companions may come to know us better than our friends and family. Suggestions See a Human Side At the opposite extreme of IBM’s Watson and Google Now is a move toward human intervention. This method springs from similar roots as the editorial and curated model that prizes personality over the finely tuned algorithm. At its heart, human intervention is about customer service. “Most retailers are realizing that their service arm is going to be a key area where they’re going to be able to differentiate themselves from the Amazons and Alibabas of the world,” said richrelevance’s Selinger. This also relates to product assortment. “The merchandiser has something that the algorithm doesn’t have, which is a gut feeling,” said Liad Agmon, CEO of Dynamic Yield, a personalization platform. “The algorithm can figure out in 30 days that iphone 6 is a hot item right now, because it trends all the data. But we all know that iphone 6 is a hot item right now.” As an extension, products that rely on taste and style benefit particularly from human insights. Fashion and luxury brand Carolina Herrera recently introduced an invite-only clienteling app, Herrera Style, that provides high-spending customers with genuinely personalized picks. Users swipe the items they like and can then pick them up in person. According to Tony King, founder and creative director at King & Partners, the digital agency that developed the app, Herrera Style is an extension of what luxury brands currently do. “The sales associates already communicate with these people on mobile devices, they’re just using text, email, or they’re calling them. So why not use the same mobile device to actually send product recommendations in a feed?” Far less exclusive, Sears’ Get Advice lets the department store chain’s loyalty program members ask questions and receive product advice from sales representatives and fellow members via desktop or mobile. Eric Jaffe, senior vice president for Sears’ Shop Your Way loyalty program, explained that the retailer is also addressing personalization with another initiative, the Personal Shopper program. “It allows members to give and receive shopping advice from shopping experts across a varied range of product categories. Any member can become a Personal Shopper—and in doing so they
  33. 33. Babelfish Articles August 2014 – December 2014 9-1-15 Page 33 can earn up to 5% cash in commission from purchases made by their friends and family at Sears and Kmart,” he said. The wisdom of crowds is also being harnessed by companies like Evergage, a real-time web personalization technology provider that in September 2014 launched Evergage Tribes, a solution that lets online shoppers find products by browsing similar interests or personas via hashtagged “tribes” like #cookingmom or #newhomeowner. In March 2014, online retailer Zappos.com piloted a program on Instagram playing off the popular hashtag #OOTD (“outfit of the day”). Users posting photos of themselves can add #nextootd to ask someone at Zappos to create product recommendations based on the Instagrammer’s style, friends, hobbies and activities. “We’ll pick six to eight things out of the Zappos product catalog that we think they might like. And so it’s kind of like personal shopping on Instagram,” said Will Young, director of the retailer’s Zappos Labs unit. “It’s just a new way to engage with our customers on these emerging channels.” These involved degrees of personal interaction obviously can’t replace all product recommendations. “We know that to scale we truly can’t involve humans to the extent that everyone might like. To get that personal touch we’re going to have to figure out how to blend that in pretty interesting ways,” said Adobe’s Lindsay. Conclusions Traditional product recommendations aren’t disappearing, but new approaches are emerging. Driven by the uptake in mobile, advances in data analysis, growth of visual social networks and a desire for more natural means to discover products, retailers are experimenting with new ways to match shoppers with what they really want to buy. There is a fine line between personalization and privacy invasion—and it keeps shifting. Sentiment evolves as consumers become more comfortable with emerging technology. For example, shoppers are relatively comfortable with cookies that display blue dresses based on past browsing. But a mobile notification about blue dresses based on where a shopper is standing in a boutique may elicit negative responses. Despite the promise that data holds, retailers are still challenged by personalization. There is mounting consumer pressure to deliver customized content—including recommendations—faster and in real time. But having enough data, the right data and the ability to share it between departments are hindrances to providing the kind of personalization consumers appreciate. Three criteria aid ad effectiveness 27 October 2014 SINGAPORE: However appealing creativity may be for advertisers, truly effective campaigns generally show three key criteria, two leading marketing academics have argued. Ang Swee Hoon and Lee Yih Hwai, associate professors of marketing at the National University of Singapore Business School, said that the makings of an effective, creative ad requires a campaign that is novel, meaningful and connected. Writing for Marketing Interactive, they identified the latest series of ads for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Singapore as a good example of creative advertising.

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