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20115 APC Article - 7 Techniques for Hiring the Best Employees_opt

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20115 APC Article - 7 Techniques for Hiring the Best Employees_opt

  1. 1. InnerView Advisors, Inc. Art Snarzyk 219 Main Street St. Peters, MO 63376
  2. 2. F E A T U R E S 30 6 Steps to Pressure Washer Success By Daniel Leiss 32 Elevated Decision-Making Choosing the right tools for reaching heights can increase safety and productivity. By Justin Kissinger 35 7 Techniques for Hiring the Best Employees By Art Snarzyk 37 What’s the Paint Forecast? Preparing to paint during extreme weather conditions. By Jeff Stein MARCH 2015 ■ Vol. 92, No. 2 C O L U M N S 6 From the Editor: Gearing Up for the Busy Season By Emily Howard 8 Online Contents See what’s new on www.paintmag.com. 10 Speaking With PDCA: It’s All About Relationships 12 From the Field: Choosing the Right Deck Finish A few things you need to know before you hit the decks this season. By Scott Burt 18 Sound Business Management: Avoiding the ‘Salesman Disease’ for a Successful Business Salespeople should avoid these common pitfalls for a successful business. By Monroe Porter 24 Techniques for Craftsmen: Window Sash and Casing Preparation 26 Decorative Touch: Faux Is Not Dead Tips for Applying Popular Faux Finishes. By Victor DeMasi 4 March 2015 • APC On the Cover: Cover photos courtesy of Victor DeMasi. D E P A R T M E N T S Contractor’s Tool Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Advertiser Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
  3. 3. AMERICAN PAINTING CONTRACTOR • March 2015 35 You’ll likely run an ad, get a few interested applicants and try to determine whether they will work for your company. Some will give you a resume while others will call and just ask when they start, because, after all, you only need a brush and a ladder to call yourself a painter. The voice on the other end says, “I’m the best. I’ve been doing this for 20 years. I have my own tools; try me out. I’ll paint circles around your other guys. I’ll start Monday!” Then the honeymoon begins. You get hitched and spend the next couple of weeks or months figuring out who we just married. I failed to mention how I like the toilet seat and where I’ll leave my dirty clothes. He didn’t tell me he was a bad cook. Sometimes we look back and realize we knew it was coming. Other times, it all seemed great and we are left wondering, “What happened? This isn’t the person I interviewed!” Know What You Want Many suggest that to make this process easier, you should “hire fast and fire faster.” Here’s the catch — you have to know what you’re looking for first. Instead of hiring quickly, plan how you’re going to hire. What a good employee looks like should be so clear that it is glaringly obvious whether a given candidate is the one or not. Spend time defining what excellent employees for your company would be like instead 7Techniques for Hiring the Best Employees By Art Snarzyk Spring is coming and it’s time to think about adding employees to handle the uptick in business that will naturally occur.
  4. 4. 36 March 2015 • APC of agonizing over resumes or applica- tions you’ve collected. The clearer you are about the job, the better you’ll be able to recognize the people who are right for it. Interview for Skills, Not Just Likability Have you ever hit it off with someone and later found out he or she was a ter- rible worker? How many excellent employees have you missed because they “didn’t interview well?” Without a good game plan, most people hire peo- ple they like. Someone may be likable during the interview but a horrible choice for the position. Conversely, quiet, intro- verted people may not stand out during the interview, but may be exactly what your company needs. Of course, sales- people should be highly skilled at mak- ing a fast and great first impression, but technicians? Basing the success of an interview on how much the candidate inspired you or the connection you felt or how enthusiastic the candidate is, may make you miss those ideal, routine, reli- able technicians. Know what type of per- son is naturally suited for the position. You don’t have to walk out of the inter- view as best friends. That will come later when your new hire is doing a great job. Don’t Make Decisions During the Interview Interviews are a naturally high-stress environment for candidates and employees alike. Most companies use this time to get a feel for whether the candidate will be a good fit. Although you should usually trust your intuition, you won’t be successful by leaving it to your gut to make hiring decisions. The candidates need work. They are trying to put their best face forward to land the job. That usually leads to them highlighting their best achieve- ments, downplaying their weaknesses, embellishing and sometimes lying. As employers, we need someone to get to work. During interviews we can overlook the telltale signs of an employee who might not be good for our company. We can “sell” the posi- tion to the candidate and can often be looking through rose-colored glasses. You need to have a clear plan so emotion doesn’t have a chance to play in. This is a business decision. Ask Questions That Matter You may have heard some of the odd questions some companies ask candi- dates, such as “why are manholes round?” or “which fruit best describes you?” The questions are pointless if they don’t tell you something about the can- didate’s technical abilities, soft skills or company fit. Unless you need very cre- ative or rapid-fire problem solvers on your team, trick questions like these are just for your entertainment. Instead, ask questions that uncover how well some- one will do the job and how he or she will fit in your company. Ask Open-Ended Questions These questions require a more detailed response that allows you to make better hiring decisions. If a ques- tion can be answered with a short answer like yes or no or a choice between two things, consider reframing the question to get a more thorough answer. The following are examples of introductions to a few good open-ended questions. • Describe a situation when you… • Tell me about a time when… • Give me an example of how you… If managing others is important, con- sider changing your question from “have you ever managed others?” to “can you tell me about the last time you had to manage others?” This will give you more insight into how they will likely behave in your company. You can learn much more about someone by setting up ques- tions that require them to elaborate. Don’t Rely Too Much on Experience Just because someone has done a similar job for five years doesn’t mean he or she is good at doing the job you’re hiring for. When looking at expe- rience, what you are really trying to dis- cover is “did this person learn what I think he should have learned by work- ing in that environment for that long?” Unfortunately, many people hold a job and just get by for a long time. Remem- ber, it’s possible that a grocery store bagger with one year of experience has learned more about working in a quick, organized, consistent and helpful team environment than has a production painter of five years. What skills has he picked up that he will bring to your company? Compare Apples to Apples Too often, interviews are conducted without a plan. They resemble a speed- dating, get-to-know-you conversation that varies from candidate to candidate. Also, changing the order of questions changes the dynamics of the interviews, which confuses your decision and allows bias to creep in. After interviewing a number of candidates, you can be left confused about the best decision. Make a list of questions you will ask all appli- cants in the same order so you can eas- ily compare them. Prepare, ask the right questions and remove as much bias from interviews as possible. Knowing what you’re looking for makes it obvious when the right person walks in for an interview. It will also be obvious when the candidate you’re inter- viewing doesn’t stand a chance. APC Art Snarzyk helps large and small companies hire high-potential employ- ees. As a former painting contractor, he loves helping fellow tradesmen build excellent teams so their businesses run with less effort from the owners. Contact Art if you need guidance developing interview questions that will work for you. 7Techniques for Hiring the Best Employees

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