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Begin	1
Applying the design thinking
process to building a more
inclusive graphic design
curriculum
Are we teaching the wr...
What you won’t get from this workshop?
Intro	3
What will you (actually) get from this workshop?
1. Create a set of personas that are representative of a sample o...
Intro	4
As a designer you need to know:
1. What is your problem?
2. Who is your audience?
Design Process: Discover, Develo...
Exercise 1: 2–5min	 5
What’s the problem?
Write down at least one problem related to student retention
and success.
Persona 	 6
Creating personas:
Pruitt (2003) argues that designers often have a “vague or
contradictory sense” (p.2) of th...
Exercise 2: 15min	7
Who is your audience?
Personas can be created using ethnographic style methods. Data
can be drawn from...
Student Example	 8
Example of a persona
The Working Parent (code name: WoPa)
	 35-50 years old
	 has at least 1 child
	 wo...
Student Example	 9
Example of a persona (cont.)
I have a finite amount of time in the day to accomplish things. My kids
ar...
Exercise 3: 10min	10
What are the insights?
Ideas, concepts and theory can be applied to data (persona) to
provide insight...
Student Example	 11
Example of a persona writing
I have a finite amount of time in the day to accomplish things. My kids
a...
Austerlitz Connection	 12
“Superstudent” (Theory)
No family commitments or financial imperatives…Highly motivated and
as p...
Student Insights	 13
Data from WoPa based on theory
I have a finite amount of time in the day to accomplish things. My kid...
WoPa connection	 14
Example Student (WoPa) Insights
Limited time, study time is between activities
Degree is not primary c...
Exercise 4: 10min	15
Insights to solutions
Explore how the persona experiences your problem:
	 (macro) EX: Program Learnin...
Application Example	 16
Macro things like:
We rewrote the PLOs. This allowed for more room for “meets” students
while stil...
Application Example	 17
Micro things like:
We audited each of our classes down to the assignments for each week.
We found ...
End	18
Approach the problem by
knowing your audience.
Jeremy Stout:
emailstout@gmail.com	http://thesisadvice.tumblr.com/
A...
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Are we teaching the wrong students?

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Presentation given at AIGA Frontiers 2016 about using personas for curriculum and institutional change

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Are we teaching the wrong students?

  1. 1. Begin 1 Applying the design thinking process to building a more inclusive graphic design curriculum Are we teaching the wrong students?
  2. 2. What you won’t get from this workshop?
  3. 3. Intro 3 What will you (actually) get from this workshop? 1. Create a set of personas that are representative of a sample of your student population. 2. Draw insights from student personas that can lead to solutions for specified problems.
  4. 4. Intro 4 As a designer you need to know: 1. What is your problem? 2. Who is your audience? Design Process: Discover, Develop, Design, Deploy
  5. 5. Exercise 1: 2–5min 5 What’s the problem? Write down at least one problem related to student retention and success.
  6. 6. Persona 6 Creating personas: Pruitt (2003) argues that designers often have a “vague or contradictory sense” (p.2) of the intended users, a persona provides a focus for goal oriented design. Personas are a technique that moves the designer away from designing based on a scenario, to designing based on the user. Pruitt & Grudin. “Personas: practice and theory.” Proceedings of the 2003 conference on Designing for user experiences. ACM, 2003.
  7. 7. Exercise 2: 15min 7 Who is your audience? Personas can be created using ethnographic style methods. Data can be drawn from conversations, interviews, emails, meetings, data, observations, etc. Identify some characteristics and demographics of your student such as: age, education, location, occupation, family, etc. Write from their perspective about their experience. Be their voice including language and quirks. Don’t be afraid to empathize.
  8. 8. Student Example 8 Example of a persona The Working Parent (code name: WoPa) 35-50 years old has at least 1 child working part-time or full-time lives in a suburb or remote town
  9. 9. Student Example 9 Example of a persona (cont.) I have a finite amount of time in the day to accomplish things. My kids are my priority, my work has to fit around them and my design degree has to fit around my kids and my job. I make time for my school work, but it is often late at nights and between activities. I am often burned out and discouraged by my performance and inability to just “get it” quickly. I find the projects and concepts to be difficult because I do not have a high level design background although I have been practicing design for a long time. I want to get better and I apply the ideas I get from the classes. I find it hard sometimes to embrace the new.
  10. 10. Exercise 3: 10min 10 What are the insights? Ideas, concepts and theory can be applied to data (persona) to provide insights. Break down data as it relates to your problem. Identify insights about your student population as it relates to the problem.
  11. 11. Student Example 11 Example of a persona writing I have a finite amount of time in the day to accomplish things. My kids are my priority, my work has to fit around them and my design degree has to fit around my kids and my job. I make time for my school work, but it is often late at nights and between activities. I am often burned out and discouraged by my performance and inability to just “get it” quickly. I find the projects and concepts to be difficult because I do not have a high level design background although I have been practicing design for a long time. I want to get better and I apply the ideas I get from the classes. I find it hard sometimes to embrace the new.
  12. 12. Austerlitz Connection 12 “Superstudent” (Theory) No family commitments or financial imperatives…Highly motivated and as passionate about their subject as their tutors. They would be totally dedicated to study, wanting to, and able to, spend every waking hour… excelling at every aspect of the modern art and design curriculum, able to write, argue, debate, articulate, present, negotiate, draw, create, invent, and innovate, all within the context of the current politico-social global environment and capable of adapting and changing as the fast changing modern world throws technologies and problems their way. (p.16) Austerlitz, N., Blythman, M., Grove-White, A., Jones, B.A., Jones, C.A., Morgan, S.J., et al. (2008). Mind the gap: Expectations, ambiguity and pedagogy within art and design higher education. In L. Drew (Ed.), The student experience in art and design higher education: Drivers for change (p 125–148). Cambridge: JRA Publishing.
  13. 13. Student Insights 13 Data from WoPa based on theory I have a finite amount of time in the day to accomplish things. My kids are my priority, my work has to fit around them and my design degree has to fit around my kids and my job. I make time for my school work, but it is often late at nights and between activities. I am often burned out and discouraged by my performance and inability to just “get it” quickly. I find the projects and concepts to be difficult because I do not have a high level design background although I have been practicing design for a long time. I want to get better and I apply the ideas I get from the classes. I find it hard sometimes to embrace the new.
  14. 14. WoPa connection 14 Example Student (WoPa) Insights Limited time, study time is between activities Degree is not primary concern Can be easily discouraged Disconnect between actual level of design and perceived level Sometimes fears the unknown
  15. 15. Exercise 4: 10min 15 Insights to solutions Explore how the persona experiences your problem: (macro) EX: Program Learning Outcomes (things in the middle) EX: Class Learning Outcomes (micro) EX: Assignment expectations
  16. 16. Application Example 16 Macro things like: We rewrote the PLOs. This allowed for more room for “meets” students while still allowing for students to “exceed”. Example of Formal Skills PLO: - Produce work demonstrating mature/competent aesthetics. - Make effective typographic choices. - Demonstrate command/competence of media, materials, and technique.
  17. 17. Application Example 17 Micro things like: We audited each of our classes down to the assignments for each week. We found that in many cases we were asking students to do things that were unnecessary or excessive. Example of assignment: An assignment asked for 80 thumbnails as a minimum requirement in a week. Requiring 20 and recommending 80 was a better solution.
  18. 18. End 18 Approach the problem by knowing your audience. Jeremy Stout: emailstout@gmail.com http://thesisadvice.tumblr.com/ Anitra Nottingham: anitra@anitraland.com twitter: @anitranot What we hope you got from this workshop:

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