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The Road to Recovery:
Lessons from community
organisations’ role
supporting older people
through the pandemic
Webinar 28 J...
Neighbourhood Networks: Leeds &
Birmingham
• Setting the scene for today’s webinar.
• Centre for Ageing Better’s work in b...
Neighbourhood Networks: Leeds &
Birmingham
• Leeds: the best city to grow old in?
• Long history of support for 3rd sector...
“Life is what happens when you’re busy making
other plans…”
Communities, Coronavirus & Creative Solutions
• Covid-19 hits the UK.
• Lockdown March 23rd 2020.
• What has it meant for ...
Conclusions & Questions
• Covid-19 impact has been “devastating” & “immeasurable” (ADASS).
• Have the Neighbourhood Networ...
www.melaniehenwood.com
melanie@henwood-associates.co.uk
Covid 19
The Contribution of
Neighbourhood
Network Schemes in
Birmingham
Benita Wishart, Support and Development
Manager P...
NNS inBirmingham The Covid Response Reflections
The
Neighbourhood
Citizens 50+
Social Work
Teams
NNS Workers
LocalAssetsAsset
Directory
Birmingham's Neighbourhood Network...
Neighbourhood
AccordHousing
AgeConcern
Birmingham
WittonLodge
Community
Association
+ CompassSupport
POhWER
DisabilityReso...
The Brummie Response
Voluntary&Community
Organisations
FaithCommunitiesMutualAid
Volunteers
Working withAssets
Mapping
Support
City Council Request
25 March 2020
Some roles stayedsame
But some verydifferent
Small G...
Loneliness &Isolation
Offer
New small grants
Existing grantees modified
theirapproach
Volunteer Offer
Assets
Co-ordinate
P...
City-wide co-ordination &
Thematic Group
Mapping
Route2 Wellbeing
BVSC -
C19 Support Brum
SupporttoNNS
Weekly Zoom MeetUps
CommunityBuilding
Phoneline
Northfield
ErdingtonCovid 19Taskforce
SubheadText
Body CopyText
Communications
Erdington
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n34evaAgcWs
Food &loneliness
Helplines, dinners &scones
Sutton Coldfield
CollaborationwiththeRoyal
SuttonColdfieldTownCouncil
Listening &Connecting
Commissioned twohubs
Hall Green
Community Updates
MutualAid
Grants
Local Communication
3/4 of all grants prior to Covid 19 -Selly Oak &PerryBarr
Selly Oak
Health&WellbeingProjects CapacityBuilding
Selly Oak
DigitalExclusion
Wicked Issues
MentalHealth Benefits, Debt,
EmploymentAdvice
BereavementSupportCarerSupportTransport
Reflections
NNS providedreferral
pathways &onestop
support
Role ofelected
Members
Relationships with
social workteams
Inge...
Investment in&
recognitionof
assets
Culturalcompetence
Communications
05
04
01
06
Community
buildings
02
Opportunitiesfor
...
Emil Prysak, CommissioningManager,
Birmingham City Council
The response of the VCFSEsector
and the civil society mobilisat...
For further details about Birmingham’s Neighbourhood Network
Schemes please contact:
Emil Prysak,
Commissioning Manager
Pr...
LeedsThird
SectorResponse
to Covid-19
Ali Kaye
Third Sector
Development Manager
ali@opforum.org.uk
Leeds Older People’s Forum
LOPF aims to promote the well-being of all older people in Leeds, and to give a more
powerful v...
Leeds Third Sector Response to Covid-19
❑Leeds City Council and Voluntary Action Leeds – city wide response to supporting ...
LeedsThird
SectorResponse
toCovid-19
Ali Kaye
Third Sector Development
Manager
ali@opforum.org.uk
T.@LeedsOPF
Real Time Evaluation of Leeds Neighbourhood Networks
During the COVID 19 Pandemic
The Road to Recovery: Lessons from commu...
What is Real Time Evaluation (RTE)?
• Developed in the context of humanitarian crisis response
• Involves a flexible, rapi...
Overview of RTE Findings
• Findings fall into four categories:
1. The crisis response: what the LNN did, who it supported,...
1. The LNN crisis response
• Key descriptors: rapid, flexible, responsive, person-centred, locally-focussed
• Many NNs ‘sa...
1. The LNN crisis response
• Each NN response determined by some key enabling factors and mechanisms:
– Resources and capa...
2. The position of the LNN within the city-wide response
• Two broad types of LNN role: complementary and supplementary (Y...
3. Challenges associated with the LNN response
• Intensification of NN’s work – particularly for ‘key’ individuals
– NNs d...
3. Challenges associated with the LNN response
• Being a community hub creates a tension for NNs:
– A key role that comple...
3. Challenges associated with the LNN response
• LNN funding and sustainability:
– NNs not at immediate risk of funding cr...
4. Facing forwards: practical concerns
• Moving from an acute ‘crisis’ response to ‘recovery’ and a ‘new normal’:
– Initia...
4. Facing forwards: practical concerns
• Support during the pandemic ‘recovery’ phase likely to be needed in the following...
4. Facing forwards: philosophical concerns
• Many NNs now ‘more visible’ than before the crisis: to their local community;...
Next steps
This presentation builds on findings from RTE Snapshot report 1:
https://www.ageing-better.org.uk/publications/...
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The Road to Recovery: Lessons from community organisations’ role supporting older people through the pandemic

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In this webinar, part of our ‘Road to Recovery’ series exploring learning from COVID-19, our panel will consider the importance of community organisations to making and maintaining social connections, support and opportunities to participate in our communities as we age.

Find out more: https://www.ageing-better.org.uk/events/road-to-recovery-lessons-from-community-organisations

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The Road to Recovery: Lessons from community organisations’ role supporting older people through the pandemic

  1. 1. The Road to Recovery: Lessons from community organisations’ role supporting older people through the pandemic Webinar 28 July 2020 Melanie Henwood Associates
  2. 2. Neighbourhood Networks: Leeds & Birmingham • Setting the scene for today’s webinar. • Centre for Ageing Better’s work in both sites. • Understanding the policy context: similarities and differences. • Neighbourhood networks and asset based community development. • Ambition and aspiration.
  3. 3. Neighbourhood Networks: Leeds & Birmingham • Leeds: the best city to grow old in? • Long history of support for 3rd sector. • Leeds Neighbourhood Networks ‘the jewel in the crown’. • Prevention, wellbeing and personalisation. • Birmingham – Prevention First (healthy, happy independent lives). • Cultural change – Neighbourhood Networks; 3 conversations; Local Area Coordination. • Greater than the sum of the parts.
  4. 4. “Life is what happens when you’re busy making other plans…”
  5. 5. Communities, Coronavirus & Creative Solutions • Covid-19 hits the UK. • Lockdown March 23rd 2020. • What has it meant for older citizens? • Community support and response. • Opportunities for creative solutions. • APPG on Social Integration. • Mutual Aid – New Local Government Network.
  6. 6. Conclusions & Questions • Covid-19 impact has been “devastating” & “immeasurable” (ADASS). • Have the Neighbourhood Networks provided protection? • Has the pandemic been a catalyst for development? • Crisis response or permanent shift? • What is the ‘new normal’ going to look like in building and maintaining community resilience?
  7. 7. www.melaniehenwood.com melanie@henwood-associates.co.uk
  8. 8. Covid 19 The Contribution of Neighbourhood Network Schemes in Birmingham Benita Wishart, Support and Development Manager Prevention First,BVSC
  9. 9. NNS inBirmingham The Covid Response Reflections
  10. 10. The Neighbourhood Citizens 50+ Social Work Teams NNS Workers LocalAssetsAsset Directory Birmingham's Neighbourhood Network Schemes NNS: Connecting people, local activities &services Purpose /Vision
  11. 11. Neighbourhood AccordHousing AgeConcern Birmingham WittonLodge Community Association + CompassSupport POhWER DisabilityResource Centre + Age UK Birmingham's ConstituencyModel April 2019 April 2019 April 2019 April 2019 Sept 2018 Sept 2018 Nov 2019 Nov 2019 Nov 2019 DevelopmentSupport Unit,Birmingham City Council Birmingham Settlement + KarisNeighbour Scheme + SohoFirst + NechellsPod FamilyService Gateway +Northfield Community Partnership +Age UK Neighbourhood DevelopmentSupport Unit,Birmingham City Council
  12. 12. The Brummie Response Voluntary&Community Organisations FaithCommunitiesMutualAid Volunteers
  13. 13. Working withAssets Mapping Support City Council Request 25 March 2020 Some roles stayedsame But some verydifferent Small Grants Covid Priorityadded Decision-makingtaken back tocentre 5/10 NNSs gave out firstgrants Around 50grants £260,000
  14. 14. Loneliness &Isolation Offer New small grants Existing grantees modified theirapproach Volunteer Offer Assets Co-ordinate Plus Tasks Not Required in theEnd Home fromHospital Deathand Dying Essentials Offer Fooddelivery Shopping Medication
  15. 15. City-wide co-ordination & Thematic Group Mapping Route2 Wellbeing BVSC - C19 Support Brum SupporttoNNS Weekly Zoom MeetUps
  16. 16. CommunityBuilding Phoneline Northfield
  17. 17. ErdingtonCovid 19Taskforce SubheadText Body CopyText Communications Erdington https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n34evaAgcWs
  18. 18. Food &loneliness Helplines, dinners &scones Sutton Coldfield CollaborationwiththeRoyal SuttonColdfieldTownCouncil
  19. 19. Listening &Connecting Commissioned twohubs Hall Green Community Updates
  20. 20. MutualAid Grants Local Communication 3/4 of all grants prior to Covid 19 -Selly Oak &PerryBarr Selly Oak
  21. 21. Health&WellbeingProjects CapacityBuilding Selly Oak
  22. 22. DigitalExclusion Wicked Issues MentalHealth Benefits, Debt, EmploymentAdvice BereavementSupportCarerSupportTransport
  23. 23. Reflections NNS providedreferral pathways &onestop support Role ofelected Members Relationships with social workteams Ingenuity of sector Neighbourliness &volunteers
  24. 24. Investment in& recognitionof assets Culturalcompetence Communications 05 04 01 06 Community buildings 02 Opportunitiesfor connection 03 Lessons Risk & bureaucracy
  25. 25. Emil Prysak, CommissioningManager, Birmingham City Council The response of the VCFSEsector and the civil society mobilisation has been incredible in Birmingham. It is without doubt we couldn’t have been as effective without them. Not to mention BVSC whocoordinated the strategic partnership forus.
  26. 26. For further details about Birmingham’s Neighbourhood Network Schemes please contact: Emil Prysak, Commissioning Manager Prevention & Communities, Birmingham City Council Emil.Prysak@birmingham.gov.uk Or Benita Wishart, Support and Development Manager Prevention First BVSC BenitaW@bvsc.org
  27. 27. LeedsThird SectorResponse to Covid-19 Ali Kaye Third Sector Development Manager ali@opforum.org.uk
  28. 28. Leeds Older People’s Forum LOPF aims to promote the well-being of all older people in Leeds, and to give a more powerful voice to older people in shaping their city for the benefit of all citizens ❑Established March 1994 and now has a city-wide membership of 100+ third sector organisations working with older people across Leeds ❑How – representation, co-production, enabling, influencing ❑Board and Advisors ❑Our projects
  29. 29. Leeds Third Sector Response to Covid-19 ❑Leeds City Council and Voluntary Action Leeds – city wide response to supporting the shielded and vulnerable ❑ Covid-19 telephone helpline – 300 calls per day led by LCC ❑33 ward hubs established, each led by a third sector organisation led by LCC & VAL ❑City wide volunteer recruitment campaign – 8,000 volunteers led by LCC and VAL ❑Communities of Interest – LOPF and Forum Central ❑NN’s – 12 became ward hub leads; services repurposed to meet local needs.
  30. 30. LeedsThird SectorResponse toCovid-19 Ali Kaye Third Sector Development Manager ali@opforum.org.uk T.@LeedsOPF
  31. 31. Real Time Evaluation of Leeds Neighbourhood Networks During the COVID 19 Pandemic The Road to Recovery: Lessons from community organisations’ role supporting older people through the pandemic - Webinar Presentation - 28th July 2020 Chris Dayson, Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research, Sheffield Hallam University
  32. 32. What is Real Time Evaluation (RTE)? • Developed in the context of humanitarian crisis response • Involves a flexible, rapid cycle of research with regular, accessible and actionable reports to aid response planning and decision making. • Feedback/findings provided during the evaluation fieldwork, rather than afterwards. • Benefits of RTE: – Short to medium term: regular, up-to-date information at city and neighbourhood levels to support decision making and planning; help improve the reach, quality and effectiveness of the LNN response – Longer term: evidence about the role and contribution of the LNNs to the COVID 19 crisis response and recovery; inform future commissioning decisions about the role and funding of LNNs within the future health and social care
  33. 33. Overview of RTE Findings • Findings fall into four categories: 1. The crisis response: what the LNN did, who it supported, and why they responded in a particular way 2. Their position within the city-wide response: how NNs response fitted with the wider public and VCSE response 3. Challenges associated with the LNN crisis response 4. Facing forwards: practical and philosophical reflections on the future role and contribution of NNs • Based on RTE fieldwork to date: 25+ interviews with NNs; 5 interviews with wider stakeholders; 14 responses to a ‘Right Now Survey’; ongoing engagement with wider health and social care system
  34. 34. 1. The LNN crisis response • Key descriptors: rapid, flexible, responsive, person-centred, locally-focussed • Many NNs ‘saw this coming’: planning in advance of lockdown, ready to identify needs and respond quickly and flexibly. Rapid Shift from group-based to individual support. • What the NNs have done: direct support for 000’s of older people across Leeds – Provision of food, medicine and essential items – Provision of social and emotional support (i.e. welfare checks and company) • Who the NNs have supported: – Members: existing and new members (i.e. older people) in need of support – The wider community: usually when asked to take on ‘community hub’ role • Has led to increased reach and visibility: more referrals, new volunteers, additional ‘demand’
  35. 35. 1. The LNN crisis response • Each NN response determined by some key enabling factors and mechanisms: – Resources and capacity: core funding; staff capacity and availability; volunteer capacity and availability; access to facilities and equipment – Pre-existing reach, knowledge and understanding: already knew who people where, where they were, and the type of support they might need; able to access people unknown or invisible to health and care services – Embeddedness within their community: understanding of needs of specific communities of place and interest; links to wider service provision (VCSE and public); trusted presence – Values driven: commitment of key staff and volunteers to ensuring needs of community members were met wherever possible
  36. 36. 2. The position of the LNN within the city-wide response • Two broad types of LNN role: complementary and supplementary (Young, 2000) • Complementary – ‘doing what’s expected’: – Embedded in formal response structures as community hubs, co-ordinating voluntary activity – Working closely with local partners (PCNs, LCPs, VAL) to ensure local support co-ordinated effectively • Supplementary – ‘going above and beyond’: – Providing additional support outside of formal response structures – Finding new ways to reach and support vulnerable people – Engage people under the radar of many other providers
  37. 37. 3. Challenges associated with the LNN response • Intensification of NN’s work – particularly for ‘key’ individuals – NNs demonstrating both resilience and resourcefulness in response to crisis but... – Increased demand - meeting the needs of more people with the same (often less) resource – A sense that many NNs staff (and some volunteers) have had to work longer and harder to sustain the response – unlikely to lesson anytime soon – Particularly the case for ‘hubs’, but not only ‘hubs’ – Risk of burnout and burden for key staff – NNs biggest asset but also a ‘weakness’? Risk of isolation and lack of support from boards (due to age, health etc)
  38. 38. 3. Challenges associated with the LNN response • Being a community hub creates a tension for NNs: – A key role that complements formal Leeds citywide response – An ‘opportunity’? To broaden the reach and visibility of NNs (i.e. beyond existing members and older people in general)? – Or a ‘distraction’? Away from attending to the core needs of members (i.e. existing members and older people)? – Do they retain this broader role post-crisis or revert to a ‘business as usual model?
  39. 39. 3. Challenges associated with the LNN response • LNN funding and sustainability: – NNs not at immediate risk of funding crisis or closure: flexibility of core funding has been a key driver of their ability to respond – Most NNs doing what they are doing within existing budgets, cautious not to over-commit. Some additional income from service fees, donations etc – But...a sense more funding will be needed to sustain their role longer-term (inc as hubs): loss of income from some activities; current ways of working are more resource intensive – Some concern re volunteers: new volunteers returning to work (i.e. from furlough); older volunteers may continue shielding, or experience deteriorating health, so be less able to provide face-to-face support
  40. 40. 4. Facing forwards: practical concerns • Moving from an acute ‘crisis’ response to ‘recovery’ and a ‘new normal’: – Initial demand for crisis support has ‘dropped off’: what role can and should NNs play moving forward? – Current NN planning involves: • Finding new ways to provide social support, including group-based support • Getting people out and about and ‘moving more’, including as groups • Re-connecting people with their communities – Need to offer individual NNs bespoke tailored support to help them navigate this period? – What is the citywide ‘vision’ for NNs during the recovery phase? Should this come from the top- down or bottom-up? What role(s) should they play? How will this be resourced?
  41. 41. 4. Facing forwards: practical concerns • Support during the pandemic ‘recovery’ phase likely to be needed in the following areas: – Unemployment: support older people to deal with financial hardship; support to find work where appropriate – Confidence: many older people will need support to re-build confidence to re-engage with NNs and other services; and to re-connect with communities and social networks – Mental health: more acute needs due to effects of prolonged isolation; possible PTSD of COVID 19 patients – Isolation: more older people have become isolated; and effects of isolation more pronounced – Physical health: shielding has led to physical ‘de-conditioning’ with implications for strength, balance, frailty etc. Next winter a big concern – need to plan now – Digital inclusion: will be vital moving forward; some progress but more work to be done - NN recognition that their own limitations (skills, expertise etc) have been a barrier to progress (intergenerational opportunity?) • Will require more intensive model of support – therefore resource (£) - than currently provided: who will provide this? When will it be available?
  42. 42. 4. Facing forwards: philosophical concerns • Many NNs now ‘more visible’ than before the crisis: to their local community; to other parts of the system • This has led to better understanding of importance of small local VCSEs in crisis response: deepening of system-level knowledge of and relationships with NNs • But...added visibility not without ‘risks’ (Nickel and Eikenberry, 2015): – Additional demands and expectations from public services: will these be realistic and be resourced effectively? – Limits on NN autonomy and independence: could inhibit NNs ability to be flexible and responsive? – Additional top-down scrutiny, upward accountability and expectations: does this risk the bottom- up nature and essence of NNs work?
  43. 43. Next steps This presentation builds on findings from RTE Snapshot report 1: https://www.ageing-better.org.uk/publications/real-time-evaluation-leeds-neighbourhood-networks Further analysis of current data for more detailed analytical report in August Please contact me to discuss further: c.dayson@shu.ac.uk | 0114 225 2846 / 07769 233417

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