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Developing bio based products

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Developing bio based products

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When it comes to the bio-based product market, are we climbing the slope of enlightenment or stuck in the trough of disillusionment? It’s now nearly 20 years since polylactic acid entered the market as a promising new commodity plastic, so what’s changed and is the industry developing as quickly as expected?

Bio-based products compete in a world dominated by fossil derived chemicals and materials. These fossil derived incumbents have the market advantage of proven technology and mature value chains, only through long-term innovation can bio-based products hope to build a significant market share.

However, too often innovation is considered solely in the context of technical development. A far more complicated series of actions is required to transform an inventions or scientific discovery into a product or process which provides value, in other words, something innovative.

A key requirement for successful innovation is the legitimacy of the activity. Without legitimacy, policy and funding support is likely to remain poor and market demand will fail to materialise.

In this presentation we’ll look at the current bio-based product market and ask if its proponents are doing enough to convince stakeholders of its legitimacy.

When it comes to the bio-based product market, are we climbing the slope of enlightenment or stuck in the trough of disillusionment? It’s now nearly 20 years since polylactic acid entered the market as a promising new commodity plastic, so what’s changed and is the industry developing as quickly as expected?

Bio-based products compete in a world dominated by fossil derived chemicals and materials. These fossil derived incumbents have the market advantage of proven technology and mature value chains, only through long-term innovation can bio-based products hope to build a significant market share.

However, too often innovation is considered solely in the context of technical development. A far more complicated series of actions is required to transform an inventions or scientific discovery into a product or process which provides value, in other words, something innovative.

A key requirement for successful innovation is the legitimacy of the activity. Without legitimacy, policy and funding support is likely to remain poor and market demand will fail to materialise.

In this presentation we’ll look at the current bio-based product market and ask if its proponents are doing enough to convince stakeholders of its legitimacy.

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Developing bio based products

  1. 1. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Developing Bio-based Products More than just an issue of cost
  2. 2. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Bio-based products – A large and diverse market Vanilla to ethanol Paper to plastic Polyamides to polyolefins Amyris to BASF Coca Cola to Ford 47% 30% 1% 6% 1% 15% Polymers Oleochemicals Natural products Naval Stores Chemical derivatives Fermentation products Excludes paper and card
  3. 3. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Market penetration Cheaper SmarterFriendlier
  4. 4. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Searching for sustainability Planet PeopleProfit Seven out of 10 chemical industry executives believe that bio-based materials, produced from renewable feedstocks, will be in common use within the next five years.
  5. 5. Copyright © NNFCC 2018
  6. 6. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Brand owner perspectives
  7. 7. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Bring on bio
  8. 8. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Beyond the hype 2002 Natureworks begin PLA production 2006 DuPont/Tate&Lyle commence 1,3-PDO production 2009 PlantBottle™ launched 2010 Braskem PE plant commissioned 2010 Reverdia JV announced 2013/14 Ind Biotech share prices peak 2015 KiOR files for bankruptcy 2015 Bioamber opens SA plant 2016 Solazyme exits biofuels 2016 Novamont BDO production commences 2018 Rennovia exit 2018 Bioamber files chapter 11 bankruptcy 2017 Gevo announces reverse stock split2017 DuPont exits cellulosic ethanol 2010 Amyris IPO 2009 Lead Market Recommendations
  9. 9. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Investor confidence
  10. 10. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Market growth revision 3.5% CAGR
  11. 11. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Brand owner issues
  12. 12. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Is bio, clean techs illegitimate child? Innovation Knowledge Generation Knowledge exchange Legitimacy Creation of markets Entrepreneurial activity Guidance of the search Mobilization of resources
  13. 13. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 What does bio mean? bio derived bio renewable bio process bio degradable bio compatible bio product bio technology bio based bio economy bio inspired bio fuel bio energy
  14. 14. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Market confusion What the hell are bioplastics?
  15. 15. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Implications? Obviously, all petroleum is plant-based—it’s called “fossil fuel” because it comes from the remains of ancient organisms such as plants and animals. It has taken millions of years to go from plants to oil but, technically, all petroleum is biobased, so we in the industry should not make a distinction such as, petroleum based = bad; plant- or biobased = good.
  16. 16. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Marketing spin when plastic isn’t plastic ………is made of plants, not plastic. Using 100% Plant made Bottles enables companies to improve their sustainable practices and step away from using plastics which are made with finite resources such as fossil fuels and reduce their carbon footprint.
  17. 17. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 The academic debate And, what’s more, plastic made from plants really isn’t that sustainable. displace local farmers onto more marginal and vulnerable land, and ethanol refineries with highly exploitative working conditions.
  18. 18. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 The toxic ILUC effect
  19. 19. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 We need to talk about biodegradables Bags represent 70% of the EU’s ~100,000tonnes biodegradable products market Loss of cohesion between producers, local authorities and composters Lack of confidence in science and standards, and lack of trust in consumers Poor collection and composting infrastructure
  20. 20. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Secondary to convenience, looks and price Focus on product benefitsBiobased as additional value Purchases based on ‘what’s in it for me’ Product specific, communication needs to be context specificPersonal benefits Natural perceived as positive Technology perceived as bad Mixed feelings lead to ambivalence Positive, negative and mixed feelings 100% bio-based preferred Low percentages can be perceived as green washingFull vs partial biobased Purchase decisions take into account all information of raw materials, location, production method etc.Coherent product concepts Consumer purchasing Sijtsema et al, NJAS, 77 (2016) 61-69
  21. 21. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Resistance to change “It's only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.” Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands
  22. 22. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Commission Expert Group on Bio-based Products Five years on, the promise and potential of creating new markets through stimulation measures for renewable, EU sourced, bio-based products, have still not been realised. After almost a decade of work examining mechanisms to help ‘level the playing field’ with a highly subsidised and well established fossil carbon industry base, little in the way of concrete support has actually materialised.
  23. 23. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Perfect, the enemy of the good
  24. 24. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 UK development 2008 Gallagher Review 2008 IBTI Club 2009 Industrial Biotechnology Innovation and Growth Team 2010 BBSRC confirm IB & Bioenergy as one of its strategic priorities 2013 Industrial Biotechnology Showcase 2014 Industrial Biotechnology Catalyst 2014 Networks in Industrial Biotechnology & Bioenergy 2015 Govt Building a high value bioeconomy report 2016 IB Catalyst mothballed 2018 IFR Biorefinery Centre closes 2016 BioPilots UK formed 2011 NIBF expansion 2007 Launch of NIBF at CPI 2017 Call for new NIBB 2018 Bioeconomy strategy Bioeconomy sector deal Industrial strategy challenge fund
  25. 25. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Summary Despite progress the high hopes for bio-based industry growth have not been realised Poor stakeholder communication is resulting in confusion, inhibiting market formation Concerns over legitimacy is holding back public finance and damaging brand owner/consumer confidence Lack of awareness/use of standards and certification in addressing sustainability concerns
  26. 26. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 However
  27. 27. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 European Standard EN 16575:2014 The term bio-based product refers to products wholly or partly derived from biomass, such as plants, trees or animals (the biomass can have undergone physical, chemical or biological treatment). i.e. Bio-based products are products derived from biomass (material of biological origin excluding material embedded in geological formations and/or fossilized)
  28. 28. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Standards and certification
  29. 29. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 RSB Principles Legality Planning, monitoring and continuous improvement Greenhouse Gas Emissions Human and labour rights Rural and social development Local food security Conservation Soil Water Air Quality Use of technology, inputs and management of waste Land rights The RSB Principles & Criteria describe how to produce biomass, biofuels and biomaterials in an environmentally, socially and economically responsible way.
  30. 30. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Peak child and population predictions Future accessibility to food is less of a question of production and nutritional need, it’s more about choice of diet and monetary income UN and Wittgenstein Centre www.ourworldindata.org
  31. 31. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Land use depends on what we eat and what we waste
  32. 32. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Driving change Continued support for research will result in better processes and products and production experience will drive down costs Researchers need to understand the industry and political context of their research and be able defend its legitimacy Industry bodies need to drive for a consensus around terms and communication Legislation and public investment can drive system change e.g. compostable packaging needs co-development with composting facilities and green/food waste collection
  33. 33. Copyright © NNFCC 2018 Promoting Bio-innovation in Europe
  34. 34. 15 years of Bioeconomy development NNFCC is a specialist business consultancy, based in the UK. We provide strategic, biobased business consultancy; analysing, explaining and de- risking the bioeconomy for our clients. We help industry solve complex business challenges and provide vital evidence for policy makers. | | www.nnfcc.co.uk | enquiries@nnfcc.co.uk

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