Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen
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Folgen des Klimawandels für in Armut lebende Menschen

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  • Corn harvests in Ethiopia Lekea Borana, from Oromia, Ethiopia, relies on corn from her family’s fields to feed their livestock. Recent harvests have been poor, however, and she was one of several thousand people who discussed the effects of changing weather here as part of an Oxfam climate tribunal in 2010. Photo: Oxfam / Aubrey Wade http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfam/5212672107/ Lekea Borana aus Oromia, Äthiopien, ist auf die Maisernte von den Feldern ihrer Familie angewiesen um ihr Vieh zu versorgen. In letzter Zeit sind die Ernten stark zurückgegangen,
  • Mali © Crispin Hughes/Oxfam von Webseite im Pressebereich Resource ID 12792 Access Open Region West Africa Country Mali Area Doro SCO 1.1 Food & Income Security, 1.2 Employment, 3.1 Saving and Protecting Lives, 5.1 Gender Equity Classification Programme Use Oxfam GB/International Project Number(s) MLIA35; MLIA36 Project Name West Africa Regional Pastoralist Programme Date 10 June 05 Credit Crispin Hughes/Oxfam Copyright Crispin Hughes Caption Ousseyni Moussa, 74 yrs, lives in Labzanga on the Niger border. He's lost several animals after a rain that happened 8 days ago. Animals are very vulnerable between the dry and rainy season because they lack pastures , become very weak often causing them to die. Ousseyni keeps the remaining weak animals under the shade of his hut, to gain some strength, however without food survival remains difficult. These difficulties are also faced in pastoral areas of the north of Mali, Niger and Bukina Faso. 'The animals were already greatly weak due to lack of food, when a rain came 8 days ago to finish them off' Labzanga is small village located on the Niger border with Mali. The drought and locusts have left their marks on the land.
  • Resource ID 46962 Access Open Region South America Country Peru Area Ancash, central Peru SCO 1.1 Food & Income Security Area of Work Livelihoods Campaign Climate Change Classification Showcase Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 15 August 08 Credit Gilvan Barreto / Oxfam GB Copyright Gilvan Barreto Caption Elisabeth Tamara, 10, with Nevado Huascaran - the highest mountain in Peru - in the background. This area of Peru is already affected by glacial retreat. Locals, who depend on melt for their water supplies, say the level of ice and snow on the mountain is retreating. In Utupampa, the community has introduced drip irrigation to help with the efficient use of water in the dry season. Olga (NOT IN PICTURE): "There is less and less water now. Before, when we would irrigate the land, it would last two weeks, now it only lasts four days because the sun is so strong. So we need more water. Water used to come from Huascaran, but now it's coming less and less. The snow on Huascaran is only up, up, up above, and each day it goes further up. Huascaran is dying because of the heat. We don't need water in winter, though there is still less - but we really need water in the summer." Olga Tamara Morales, 38. Potato farmer, Utupampa, Ancash, central Peru. Nevado Huascaran, the highest mountain in Peru, is in the background. Olga lives and farms on the steep slopes of the Andes, near the Cordillera Blanca. Her community gets its water from the glaciers, so this region will be greatly affected by glacial retreat. In Utupampa, the community has introduced drip irrigation to help with the efficient use of water in the dry season. "But suddenly there won't be any snow on the mountain. The water will go with it. Maybe in 20 years, from what I hear. We used to have snowslides every day, but now nothing. The snow used to come to this level, but no more. There are no more avalanches, no more snow. That's why we're working on drip irrigation." Leoncio Tamara, 77 (NOT IN PICTURE) Leoncio Tamara Leandro, 77, a potato farmer in Utupampa, near Huaraz in the Ancash district of central Peru. Leoncio's community is already affected by diminishing water supplies (especially in summer) due to glacial retreat and warmer temperatures. They have introduced drip irrigation techniques to make better use of the water they have, and prepare for when the water from the mountains eventually disappears.
  • Hurricane Ike  Area of Work Disaster response Humanitarian Crisis Hurricane Classification Humanitarian Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 12 September 08 Credit Diana Hernandez Cordero/Oxfam Copyright Diana Hernandez Cordero Caption Banana plantation, the area�s key crop, destroyed by the hurricane. Through the shiny green field, the floods have cut a broad swathe of destruction, brown and flat, where only feathery stumps remain. Behind rise steep green mountains. At a casual glance, it looks as if their folds are filled with snow, but the white scars in the hillsides are bare sand. �They�re caused by water erosion,� explains Oxfam Project Officer Olbert Nicolas. �Seventy-two per cent of Haiti�s energy needs come from charcoal. Less than two per cent of our forests remain, so rainwater races down the mountains causing flooding and washing the fertile topsoil away. Related Resources
  • Working in the fields in Rajasthan, India When the sun rises over Suraj ka Kheda in Rajasthan, India, Geeta begins working in fields close to her home. But ongoing drought has devastated agriculture – and of the 25 families in the village, ten have now migrated to nearby cities looking for work. Photo: Oxfam / Ami Vitale Geeta arbeit noch auf den Feldern ihres Dorfes Suraj ka Kheda in Indien. Doch fast die hälfte aller Familien dort haben aufgegeben und sind auf der Suche nach Arbeit in die Städte gegangen, weil dauerhaft zu wenig Regen die Landwirtschaft fast unmöglich macht. http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfam/5213269596/
  • gulley caused by erosion after strong rains and floods  Resource ID 46854 Access Open Region South America Country Peru Area Piura, NW Peru SCO 1.1 Food & Income Security, 3.1 Saving and Protecting Lives Area of Work Disaster Risk Reduction, Disaster response, Livelihoods Campaign Climate Change Classification Showcase Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 09 August 08 Credit Gilvan Barreto / Oxfam GB Copyright Gilvan Barreto Caption Gabriel Nime, 9 (red t-shirt), Luis Angelo Nime, 8 (yellow t-shirt), and Edwin Valverde, 8, play inside the gulley caused by erosion after strong rains and floods in Vicus, Chulucanas, near Piura in NW Peru. Vicus, like many places in the area, is prone to flooding and landslides, as the nearby river may change its course dramatically when it rains heavily. Oxfam and its partner Centro Ideas is supporting the local civil defence committee to be better prepared for when disaster strikes.
  • Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 28 April 10 Credit Cristina Vázquez Moreno / Oxfam International Copyright Cristina Vázquez Moreno Caption Water, another scarce resource. Public sources are saturated so local people open wells, frequently without sanitation, wherever they able to...The structural vulnerability, the lack of rain and the crop failure leave the central area of Chad in a critical situation of food security. The resources are scarce and the needs are pressing. Even now, when the worst is yet to come. Programme Information The direct response in Chad is led by Intermon, the OI humanitarian Lead. Planned interventions for OGB in the Eastern zone of Am Dam are: Cash For Work, food distribution, seed distribution, WASH (rehabilitation & maintenance of water points, sanitation, hygiene promotion
  • Resource ID 13017 Access Open Region West Africa Country Mali Area Frenta village, Borem District SCO 1.1 Food & Income Security, 1.2 Employment, 2.2 Education, 3.1 Saving and Protecting Lives Classification Development Use Oxfam GB/International Project Number(s) MLIA37; P00261 Project Name Mali Disaster Response Programme; Sahel Integrated Food Security And Livelihoods Programme Date 20 November 05 Credit Dave Clark/Oxfam Copyright Dave Clark Caption A pulley system is used to drag water up from the well in Frenta village, Borem District, Mali . Rebellion, inter-community conflicts, and years of drought have seriously affected the living conditions of communities in Gao. The area is known as being one of the most vulnerable in Mali in terms of food shortages. Most of the affected populations are semi-nomads and rely mainly on cattle-breeding. Oxfam GB has developed a food-security programme which aims to: -Sustain good governance in the management within associations and groups of cereal banks, cattle-trading and micro-finance. -Increase the purchasing power and access of organisations/associations to markets and credit institutions, as well as savings banks, through a domestic network with connections at a national and sub-regional level. -Improve access to basic services supporting the pastoral production system. -Improve access of pastoral communities to sub-regional markets. These activities have allowed a great part of the working population to generate incomes and stabilise displaced populations in their native regions. The problems facing rural Sahelian communities include desertification, spatially and temporally erratic rainfall, and a lack of access to basic services and markets. These factors have been compounded by two environmental factors: lower than average rainfall since 2003; locust invasions that had devastating effects on pockets of Mali, Mauritania and Niger (as well as Burkina Faso). These factors led to poor harvests for agriculturalists and poor pasture for herders (pastoralists).Pastoralists were the worst affected not only due to the reduced availability of pasture for animal fodder but because their terms of trade (livestock) deteriorated relative to the increase in the price of agricultural commodities, leading to loss of livelihoods. The Mali Disaster Response Programme aims to 1) improve immediate access to food and help rebuild livelihoods (support to livestock, agriculture) 2) Reduce communities' vulnerability through better access to water for human, animal consumption and agricultural production 3) Help reduce morbidity, malnutrition and mortality through public health activities integrated with water, education and livelihoods 4) Reinforce Oxfam and partners' capacities to work efficiently with others on food security monitoring system 5) Develop and implement an advocacy plan which deals with long term pastoralism and livelihoods issues. See story record for more information.
  • 51950_Pradhan_ICIMOD Nepal Weltweit schmelzen die Gletscher. Dann führen erst die Flüsse zuviel Wasser und treten häufiger über die Ufer. Langfristig aber werden die Flüsse eher zuwenig Wasser mit sich führen. In China sind gerade 82 Prozent der Gletscher am Schmelzen. Das führt kurzfristig zu einem „zu viel“ an Wasser und langfristig zu einem „zu wenig“ an Wasser. Resource ID 51950 Access Open Region South Asia Country Nepal Campaign Climate Change Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 25 August 09 Credit Paribesh Pradhan/ICIMOD Nepal Copyright Paribesh Pradhan/ICIMOD Nepal Caption Dig Tsho Glacier Lake in Solukhumbu – Dig Tsho Glacier Lake (4,365m) burst on August 4, 1985 spilling an estimated 200 to 350 million cubic feet of icy water with a flood wave 35 to 50 feet in height. It partially destroyed a hydro-power project, 14 bridges and various trails and patches of cultivated land roughly 55 miles below and likely to burst again if climate change glacial retreat continues... Programme Information For Nepal Climate change report use only PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press.
  • Martina Longom und die Frauen von Caicaoa holen Wasser. Die Jahreszeiten in Nord-Uganda sind unvorhersehbar geworden: mal kommt der Regen viel zu spät, mal sintflutartig. Die Ernteerträge gehen zurück. Resource ID 44496 Access Open Region HECA Country Uganda Area Karimoja Campaign Climate Change Classification Campaigns Named Person(s) Martina Longom Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 09 January 07 Credit Geoff Sayer/Oxfam Copyright Geoff Sayer Caption Martina Longom (foreground) joins women from Caicaoan village collecting water from the traditional water hole. "For the last three years the rain was late. In two of them there wasn’t enough rain for the sorghum to grow. And then last year the rains came as a flood.” Because water is becoming harder to find, members of the local women's group have successfully campaigned for and helped to build a borehole close to the village. Instead of walking for up to seven hours to collect water, the women now make a 30-minute round trip. The weather has never been perfectly predictable in Uganda – no more than it is anywhere else – but in the last few years it has become increasingly unreliable, making life much more difficult for people, like Martina, who rely on farming to survive. In early 2008, six months after the worst floods in Uganda in 35 years destroyed much of the harvest, her family’s grain store sits empty.
  • Resource Details Resource ID 60624 Access Open Region South Asia Country India Area Rajasthan Area of Work Agriculture, Construction Campaign Climate Change Classification Campaigns Misc. EMBARGOED Date 28 October 10 Credit Ami Vitale Copyright Ami Vitale Caption Sugna who has a 9 month old baby and had to migrate to the suburbs of Jaipur, Rajasthan, works on a construction site. Because of persistantly low rainfall and drought over the last decades, entire villages have emptied as people are driven to leave their traditional lives in search of a better life. Sugna arbeitet auf einer Baustelle in Jaipur, Rajastan. Durch anhaltend wenig Regen wurden ganze Dörfer gezwungen in die Städte zu gehen, um für ihren Lebensunterhalt sorgen zu können.
  • 29870_Ami Vitale_Oxfam Resource ID 29870 Access Open Region West Africa Country Mali Area Intadeyni, near Gao SCO 2.2 Education Area of Work Education Classification Development Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 15 March 07 Credit Ami Vitale/Oxfam Copyright Ami Vitale Maimouna also known as 'Mouna' Walett Igbak lives in Intadeyni. “My father’s name is Igbak. I have two younger brothers and one older brother. When I wake up in the morning, I wash, pound millet, and then go to school. I study and then come back home, I pound more millet, help to cook the meal and then eat something with my family. Then I sleep. “The name of my village is Intadeyni. I am in the fourth grade at school. I like going to school. I want to study. When I grow up, I want to be a teacher. Out of all the subjects we study at school, I like Reading and Natural Science (Biology). “After school, I like to spend time with my friends, and fetching water. I really like the vegetable garden because we now have cabbage, beetroot, and carrots.
  • 30167_Ami Vitale_Oxfam Resource ID 30167 Access Open Region Zigberi Country Burkina Faso Area Zigberi SCO 2.2 Education Area of Work Education Classification Development Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 24 March 07 Credit Ami Vitale/Oxfam Copyright Ami Vitale Caption Children carry water for their teacher, Ouedraoga Madi in Zigberi, in a remote part of Burkina Faso in the desert region near the Malian border March 24, 2007. The village had no school and after years of waiting the parents decided to build their own school, desperate to get an education for their children. Female education in Burkina Faso and West Africa is particularly difficult given the demands placed on the women and girls in society to do all of the household work like pounding the millet, preparing food, getting wood and water which is sparce and often kilometers away. Ami Vitale
  • Ein Stausee in Thailand ist durch anhaltende Dürre ausgetrocknet. Millionen leiden durch die Dürre unter Wassermangel und Ernteverlusten. Durch den Klimawandel werden solche Dürren häufiger. Beispiel Dürre in Thailand - Copyright EPA_SATAPORN THONGMA.JPG Resource ID 48858 Access Open Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 18 March 05 Credit EPA/SATAPORN THONGMA Copyright EPA/SATAPORN THONGMA Caption Waters in Lam Takong Dam in Korat, Nakhon Ratchasima province of Thailand, Thursday 17 March 2005, have dried up due to prolonged drought, allowing villagers to camp inside the dam to catch the remaining fish. Greenpeace linked rising global temperatures and climate change to the onset of one of the worst droughts to have struck Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia in recent memory. Severe water shortage and damage to agriculture brought about by the severe drought has affected millions. Programme Information These images have been provided to Oxfam by the Eurpoean Press Agency (EPA). EPA images can be used for all Oxfam publications and websites. They can also be and given freely to UK media. For newspapers and magazines outside the UK please cont EPA directly and negotiate a usage fee. The logo is attached below, please use this along side the image wherever possible. PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press. Guidelines on communicating about climate change are currently being written and will appear on Words and Pictures shortly
  • Je stärker sich das Klima wandelt, desto gravierendere Auswirkungen auf die menschliche Gesundheit sind zu erwarten. In Regionen, zum Beispiel, wo sowohl Überschwemmungen als auch Dürren zunehmen, wird durch den Mangel an sauberem Trinkwasser die Zahl der Magen-Darm- und Durchfallerkrankungen zunehmen. Resource ID 16904 Access Open Region Southern Africa Country Malawi Area Lilongwe, Malawi SCO 1.2 Employment, 2.1 Health Classification Campaigns Use Oxfam GB/International Project Number(s) Essential Services Campaign Project Name MAL000 Date 03 April 06 Credit Eva-Lotta Jansson/Oxfam Copyright Eva-Lotta Jansson/Oxfam Caption Essential Services Campaign – THIS IS NOT AN OXFAM Nurse Christine Chimbaza administers drugs to Emily Kamban, 65, who has Malaria and is a patient at the Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe.
  • Bild: 29918_Ami Vitale_Oxfam Bis zu 500 Millionen Menschen könnten in Zukunft zusätzlich Malaria ausgesetzt sein. Insbesondere schwangere Frauen und ungeborene Kinder sind gefährdet. Resource ID 29918 Access Open Region Intedeyne Country Mali Area Intadeyni, near Gao SCO 2.2 Education Area of Work Education Classification Development Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Ami Vitale Date 15 March 07 Credit Ami Vitale/Oxfam Copyright Ami Vitale Caption Fatimata Waled Dossane sits inside a mosquito net with her son in the village of Intedeyne March 15, 2007. the challenge to educate children in Mali still exists and particularly for girls. Female literacy rates never reach even 50 percent of male literacy rates. Mali has the highest percentage of people living below the poverty line in any country in the world. Ninety percent of Malians survive on less than two dollars a day. Programme Information USED: OXFAM UNWRAPPED CATALOGUE WINTER 07
  • © Nicky Wimble /Oxfam „ Das Feuerholzsammeln im Wald hat mich krank gemacht. Malaria hat es früher in unserer Region nicht gegeben.“ (Sen Sles, Provinz Kratie, Kambodscha)) Resource ID 42178 Access Open Region East Asia Country Cambodia Area Kratie Area of Work Agriculture, Livelihoods Campaign Climate Change Humanitarian Crisis Flood Classification Campaigns Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 11 August 07 Credit Nicky Wimble/Oxfam GB Copyright Oxfam GB Caption Mr Sen contracted malaria from entering the forest to collect fire wood to sell because he lost all of his assets after flood water leveled his rice paddy and he could not provide for his family. Since last year there has been an increase in the number of malaria cases which is connected to the change in climatic conditions: “There were more than 709 registered cases with 24 deaths last year compared to less then 200 cases in 2005. Dengue fever cases have also increased from 65 cases in 2006 to 145 cases so far this year, ” said Dr Cheam Saem, Director of the Provincial Health Department, Kratie Province. Mr Sen said: “I feel bad, I have a very high temperature but I have no money to buy more medicine, I own a very small plot of land which normally is not enough for my family’s consumption but this year the irregular flood destroyed almost everything and I had no choice but to enter the forest”. With extensive coastlines and a tropical climate characterized predominantly by seasonal weather patterns associated with two monsoons, Cambodia is considered by the IPCC to be highly sensitive to climate change. Over the last century, average temperatures in the Mekong Region have risen 0.3 to 0.8 degrees centigrade. Further temperature increases are expected along with more extreme weather events such as floods and droughts, changes in rainfall, disruption to seasonal monsoons, and rising sea levels. According to the IPCC, a one meter sea-level rise could flood 15,000 to 20,000 square kilometers of the Mekong delta and affect half a million square hectares of the Red River delta. In this scenario, 2,500 square kilometers of mangrove will be lost, and round1,000 square kilometers of cultivated farmland and maricultural areas will become salt marshes.
  • Resource ID 51526 Access Open Region Southern Africa Country Zimbabwe Area Gutu district, Masvingo province SCO 3.1 Saving and Protecting Lives Classification Humanitarian Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 05 May 09 Credit Caroline Gluck/Oxfam Copyright Caroline Gluck Caption Oxfam staff demonstrating how to use mosquito nets. Programme Information Oxfam helped to distribute 3,000 malaria nets at Mazuru clinic, Gutu district, Masvingo province. Altogether 21,000 nets will be handed out to more than 7 000 households in malarial-prone areas of Gutu. Insecticide impregnated nets remain the best defence against the malarial parasite which is increasingly becoming resistant to existing drugs. The high cost of buying mosquito nets has led people mainly in rural areas to resort to use of traditional herbs, which are not always effective. Oxfam is working with the ministry of health in Gutu and a local partner Rural Unity for Development Organisation (RUDO). Health officials in Gutu are carrying out health promotion campaigns and distributing educational materials on how to control and prevent malaria. The ministry of health in Gutu has only been able to do larva clearing as there have not been enough resources to do spraying and distribution of mosquito nets.
  • Resource Details Resource ID 10903 Access Open Region HECA Country Kenya Area Dambas SCO 3.1 Saving and Protecting Lives Area of Work Disaster response, Public health Humanitarian Crisis Drought, Food Crisis Classification Emergencies, Humanitarian Use Oxfam GB/International Project Number(s) KEN000 Project Name East Africa Food Crisis Original Source Oxfam GB Date 01 June 06 Credit Jane Beesley/OXFAM Copyright OXFAM Caption Sammy & George painting public health information 'Unite against diarrhoea' Transmission route & prevention. ECHO-Merlin & Oxfam initiative, funded by ECHO. Quotes to follow soon. Sammy und George malen eine Informationstafel zur Prävention von Diarrhöe. Ohne permanenten Zugang zu sauberem Trinkwasser, Z.B. in Folge von Dürren oder Unwetterkatastrophen, besteht erhöhtes Infektionsrisiko.
  • Resource ID 54137 Access Open Region HECA Country Sudan Area KEDIBA PAYAM DISTRICT, South Sudan Area of Work Distribution, Public health, Watsan Classification Development Use Oxfam GB/International Project Number(s) SDXA63 Project Name Mundri Programme, Western Equatoria Original Source Oxfam GB Date 12 December 09 Credit Caroline Gluck/Oxfam Copyright Caroline Gluck/Oxfam Caption Aida Regina, with baby girl Kituwa, and Silivia Kituwa, hygiene promoter, thinks she lost her first daughter to Malaria and is now working as a health promoter to prevent similar deaths in her area. “At the time my child passed away, I didn’t know the reason why. But after Oxfam came to our village and did health training, I realised there was a great lack of education. And I thought maybe the reason my baby died was because of malaria. I decided to do this work to teach other communities to take care of their children and prevent needless deaths. “We tell the community that malaria and diarrhoea are very dangerous for children under five; but that they are preventable diseases. They can be prevented by sleeping under nets; by people clearing away bushes around their houses; draining any stagnant water; and diarrhoea can be avoided if people keep food clean, wash their hands and drink safe water. “There are lots of changes now; but still not enough. There is a lot of work to do. This area is really big and we need more people to help. At the moment there are only 17 members of our hygiene club. But when we go into a community, people always listen to what we say. They don’t get angry, because they realise our teaching is very important for them.I’m very excited to do this job. It will save lives. It helps people who listen to the advice we give.
  • Das Risiko und die Häufigkeit von Unwetterkatastrophen nehmen weltweit zu. Sie gefährden Menschenleben, zerstören Siedlungen oder vernichten landwirtschaftliche Nutzfläche. Resource ID 48894 Access Open Region East Asia Country Indonesia Humanitarian Crisis Flood Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 15 January 09 Credit EPA/ADI WEDA Copyright EPA/ADI WEDA Caption A young boy holds a cup as he and his father escape from their flooded area in Jakarta, Indonesia, 15 January 2009. Heavy rains and high tides through the whole week hit Indonesia and paralyzed several parts of the country, including the capital Jakarta forcing hundreds of residents take refuge in emergency camps. Programme Information These images have been provided to Oxfam by the Eurpoean Press Agency (EPA). EPA images can be used for all Oxfam publications and websites. They can also be and given freely to UK media. For newspapers and magazines outside the UK please cont EPA directly and negotiate a usage fee. The logo is attached below, please use this along side the image wherever possible. PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press.
  • Resource ID 48903 Access Open Region South Asia Country India Humanitarian Crisis Flood Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 23 September 08 Credit EPA/STR Copyright EPA/STR Caption Rickshaw operator helps commuters to higher ground in the flood areas of Dhobinala, Dimapur, the commercial capital of India?s north eastern state of Nagaland on 23 September, after a heavy monsoon rain which have displaced thousands of family. The Monsoon which usually hits the South East Asia region from early June continues until September causing massive flood disaster EPA/STR Programme Information These images have been provided to Oxfam by the Eurpoean Press Agency (EPA). EPA images can be used for all Oxfam publications and websites. They can also be and given freely to UK media. For newspapers and magazines outside the UK please cont EPA directly and negotiate a usage fee. The logo is attached below, please use this along side the image wherever possible. PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press.
  • Resource ID 48834 Access Open Region CAMEXCA Country Haiti Area Cay Solei area in Gonaivez, North of Haiti Humanitarian Crisis Hurricane Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 20 September 08 Credit EPA/Kena Betancur Copyright EPA/Kena Betancur Caption A Haitian woman washes a blanket in a street of Cay Solei area in Gonaivez, North of Haiti on 20 September 2008, after the passing of 'Ike', 'Gustav' and 'Hanna' phenomenons last weeks and that left 326 dead people and thousands of affected. Climate change-related statement: 'There is some observational evidence that the intensity - although not frequency - of tropical cyclones (hurricanes, tropical storms, typhoons, cyclones) has increased in recent decades, and the number of disasters associated with tropical cyclones has also increased. It is not yet determined whether this increased cyclone intensity is caused by global warming, but under climate change scenarios, the intensity of tropical cyclones predicted as being likely to increase, with higher wind speeds, more heavy rain, and sea level rise making storm surges more severe. So, although this tropical cyclone in Haiti can not be attributed to global warming, many more people in Asia, Africa, Latin America and southern North America will face similar suffering and destruction if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut.' (NB: the word 'likely' in this context means that there is a greater than 60% certainty, according to the IPCC)
  • Resource ID 48900 Access Open Region South Asia Country India Humanitarian Crisis Flood Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 04 September 08 Credit EPA/STR Copyright EPA/STR Caption A father evacuates his children from Buraburi village in the flood-hit Morigaon district of Assam, 70km from Guwahati city, northeast India, 04 September 2008. The flood situation in the Assam state worsened as the water level is rising due to continous rain. Floods have so far claimed 15 lives in Assam and more than a million people have been affected in 1,106 villages in 12 districts and destroyed cropped area of more than 120,000 hectares and partially damaged 51,272 houses in the Assam State. Programme Information These images have been provided to Oxfam by the Eurpoean Press Agency (EPA). EPA images can be used for all Oxfam publications and websites. They can also be and given freely to UK media. For newspapers and magazines outside the UK please cont EPA directly and negotiate a usage fee. The logo is attached below, please use this along side the image wherever possible. PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press.
  • Resource ID 48898 Access Open Region South Asia Country India Humanitarian Crisis Flood Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 01 September 08 Credit EPA/STR Copyright EPA/STR Caption Flood affected villages stand at the NH 31 where they set up their relief camps in Kendukona village in Kamrup district of Assam, some 45km away from Guwahati city, northeast India, 01 September 2008. Indian army soldiers and air force helicopters were pressed into service to rescue marooned villagers in Assam after flash floods displaced more than 500,000 people and left 12 dead, officials said. Makeshift shelters were opened in government schools and offices for the displaced villagers. A Central Water Commission bulletin said the main Brahmaputra river and its tributaries were flowing above the danger mark in at least six places Programme Information These images have been provided to Oxfam by the Eurpoean Press Agency (EPA). EPA images can be used for all Oxfam publications and websites. They can also be and given freely to UK media. For newspapers and magazines outside the UK please cont EPA directly and negotiate a usage fee. The logo is attached below, please use this along side the image wherever possible
  • Resource ID 48901 Access Open Region South Asia Country India Humanitarian Crisis Flood Use Oxfam GB/International Original Source Oxfam GB Date 05 September 08 Credit EPA/PIYAL ADHIKARY Copyright EPA/PIYAL ADHIKARY Caption A picture made available on 05 September of Indian flood victims waiting for a rescue boat at Kumarkhand village 580km North of Patna, Bihar, India, 04 September 2008. An estimated 680,000 people have been evacuated and of them 256,000 have taken shelter at 285 relief camps, the state's top disaster management official said. Authorities have also rushed 180 medical teams comprising more than 1,000 doctors amid fears that crowded and unsanitary conditions could lead to outbreaks of cholera and diarrhoea. Programme Information These images have been provided to Oxfam by the Eurpoean Press Agency (EPA). EPA images can be used for all Oxfam publications and websites. They can also be and given freely to UK media. For newspapers and magazines outside the UK please cont EPA directly and negotiate a usage fee. The logo is attached below, please use this along side the image wherever possible. PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press.
  • „ Der schlimmste Hurrikan, den ich jemals erlebt habe“ „ Das Meer macht mir Angst“, sagt Ametta Pierre. „Wenn das Wetter schlechter wird, schlafe ich nicht in meinem Haus, sondern woanders. Beim letzten großen Hurrikan wurde ein riesiges Boot gegen mein Haus geschleudert – es wurde regelrecht hineingerammt. Zum Glück war ich in einem Nebenraum und wurde nicht verletzt. Jetzt haben meine sieben Kinder und ich nur noch ein halbes Haus. Ich weiß nicht, wie ich es wieder aufbauen soll, denn ich habe kein Geld, um die Schäden zu reparieren.“ Im August 2007 traf der Hurrikan „Dean“ die Küstenregion Bainet in Haiti, wo Ametta Pierre lebt, und zerstörte alles – Häuser, Felder, Saatgut und Fischerboote. Auch eine große Zahl von Nutztieren wurde getötet, sodass viele Menschen ihre Lebensgrundlagen verloren. Die Hurrikane, die die karibischen Küsten treffen, werden zunehmend stärker. Damit bestätigen sich die Vorhersagen der Wissenschaftler, dass die tropischen Wirbelstürme wegen des fortschreitenden Klimawandels weltweit an Intensität zunehmen werden. „ Der Hurrikan der hier durchgezogen ist, war der schlimmste, den ich jemals erlebt habe“, sagt Ametta Pierre. „Die Natur ist feindselig geworden. Früher war es angenehm, so dicht am Meer zu leben, aber jetzt hat sich das Meer verändert. Wenn es kommt, bringt es Gefahr. Es ist gefährlich hier zu leben.” Resource ID 41842 Access Open Region CAMEXCA Country Haiti Area Bainet SCO 3.1 Saving and Protecting Lives Area of Work Disaster Risk Reduction, Disaster preparedness, Disaster response Campaign Climate Change Humanitarian Crisis Hurricane Classification Showcase Use Oxfam GB/International Project Number(s) HAIB09 Project Name Recovering Livelihood For Affected Farmers and Fishers In The South East, Haiti Original Source Oxfam GB Date 15 October 07 Credit Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam Copyright Abbie Trayler-Smith Caption "I fear the sea. I sleep somewhere else when the weather gets bad as I'm too scared. A huge boat crashed into my home – the hurricane pushed the boat on to my house. I was in the next room so I wasn't hurt. Now I have half a house and I have seven children. I have no idea how I will rebuild my house as I don’t have any money to repair the damage to my house." "The hurricane that passed (Dean) was the worst I've witnessed. Nature has become mean to us. Before it was nice living so close to the sea but now the sea has changed. When it comes up it’s dangerous. It's risky living here." Ametta Pierre, 51, her house destroyed by Hurricane Dean. Programme Information In August 2007 Hurricane Dean hit the coastal area of Bainet, Haiti, destroying homes and livelihoods. The majority of the considerable damages were recorded in the agricultural and fishing sectors, in addition to the destruction of more than 1,050 homes. The total loss of seeds has been calculated at US$30,000 with an additional US$70,000 USD lost in livestock. The fishing sector also took a heavy hit, with more than 40 fishing canoes and equipment destroyed. More than 120 women fish vendors lost stock and equipments, with an estimated loss of US$40,000. Oxfam implemented a six-month response with partner CROSE Coordination Régionale des Organisations du Sud-Est. The project aimed to recover livelihoods by providing assets to farmers, fishers and fish-vendors, with the specific objective of supporting the livelihoods of 450 farmer and fisher families. This included the distribution of plantain cuttings, agricultural tools (hoes, machetes, pickaxes), livestock (goats and pigs), fishing equipment and support to fish vendors Oxfam’s partners have worked with the local community to introduce hurricane early warning systems, including the use of community radio, so people have enough time to move to higher and safer ground. They also work with local authorities to evacuate people and ensure they are moved to safe areas. CLIMATE CHANGE MESSAGING "The hurricanes hitting the Caribbean are becoming more intense and this is consistent with global predictions of increasingly intense hurricanes as a result of climate change; governments need to invest in adapting to a changing world with those that are more responsible for this stumping up the cost of this (adaptation)." PLEASE NOTE- Due to recent complaints about Oxfam's climate change communications received by the Advertising Standards Authority, please ensure ALL final resources are signed off by Julie Wood before going to press.
  • 56982_Andy Hall/Oxfam Area Nairobi Marginalsiedlungen – v.a. in großen Städten an Hängen, auf Überschwemmungsland – circa 1 Milliarde Menschen weltweit
  • Haiti: Filling all water tanks Final check of all bladders and water tanks being filled, soap being inside of the hand-wahing buckets next to the latrines. Photo by Kateryna Perus/Oxfam As tropical storm Tomas churns toward Haiti, the government of the earthquake-ravaged nation is leading emergency preparations with support from aid agencies, which have stockpiled essential goods including medical supplies and food. Throughout the hurricane season, which started June 1, Oxfam has been preparing for a major storm in Port-au-Prince, the camp-filled capital, and surrounding communities. More than one million people are still living under tarps and in tents since a January earthquake destroyed great swaths of the city. Oxfam has reinforced its water and sanitation facilities, by tying down water bladders, adding extra supports to shower stalls, and taking precautions to ensure that latrines don’t flood. In addition, Oxfam has been clearing canals and digging drains for months. Despite these preparations, Oxfam remains very concerned about the impact heavy rains may have on the spread of cholera, and other diseases. If there is storm flooding and the water does not drain off, waterborne diseases can spread quickly. http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfam/5148660212/
  • Der steigende Meeresspiegel wird tiefliegende und flache Küstenzonen und sogar ganze Inselstaaten langfristig verschwinden lassen oder macht sie dauerhaft unbewohnbar, weil Meerwasser die Böden und Grundwasser versalzt. Foto: © Toby Parkinson/Oxfam „ Wenn die Flut hoch steht, sieht man, wie das Salzwasser aus dem Boden hervorquillt. Wir können keine Gemüsegärten mehr anlegen und (…) wir werden sehr bald unsere Heimat verlassen müssen." (Ursula Rakova, Carteret-Inseln, Papua Neuguinea)
  • Carteret Atoll / Carteret Islands / Tulun It was widely reported in November 2005 that the islands have progressively become uninhabitable, with an estimate of their total submersion by 2015. The islanders have fought a more than twenty years battle,[ citation needed ] building a seawall and planting mangroves . However, storm surges and high tides continue to wash away homes, destroy vegetable gardens and contaminate fresh water supplies. The natural tree cover on the island is also being impacted by the incursion of saltwater contamination of the fresh water table.  Ursula Rakova Foto: Wikipedia (Courtesy NASA) Diese Datei ist gemeinfrei ( public domain ), da sie von der NASA erstellt worden ist. Die NASA-Urheberrechtsrichtlinie besagt, dass „NASA-Material nicht durch Urheberrecht geschützt ist, wenn es nicht anders angegeben ist “. ( NASA-Urheberrechtsrichtlinie-Seite oder JPL Image Use Policy ).
  • 48680_Caroline Gluck_Oxfam Some groups go even further. They want industrialized nations to open up their borders, so that environmental refugees from Least-Developed Countries (LDC’s) like Bangladesh, forced to move from their lands, can find alternative and safer locations for their families. Bangladesh is not only one of the world’s poorest countries its also one of the most crowded, with more than 158 million people crammed into a land area of about 144,000 square kilometers. Scientists predict that Bangladesh could lost up to one fifth of its land by 2050 because of rising sea levels, displacing millions. Umweltflüchtlinge - Bis 2050 sind weltweit zw. 150 und 350 Millionen Umweltflüchtlinge zu erwarten
  • Manmade embankments protect the low-lying villages Most of the low lying villages - like this one in the Sunderbans, India - are below the sea level and had been protected my earth/mud embankments. The embankments were breached or destroyed across many coastal areas in southern India and Bangladesh. In India, the government paid local workers to attempt to plug the breaches, but the scale of breaches in embankments was massive -- hundreds of breaches across miles of enbankments that protect these villages. Credit: Joel Bassuk / Oxfam http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfam/4641807833/
  • Foto: 58112_Suzi O'Keefe Oxfam_Indonesien Der ansteigende Meeresspiegel bedroht Inseln in ihrer Existenz. Bis 2030 könnten in Indonesien 2000 Inseln untergehen alleine in Asien und Pazifik sind das 2 Milliarden Menschen, die in Flussdeltas oder in Küstennähe wohnen
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